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Publication
Journal: Nature
June/7/2006
Abstract
On activation, T cells undergo distinct developmental pathways, attaining specialized properties and effector functions. T-helper (T(H)) cells are traditionally thought to differentiate into T(H)1 and T(H)2 cell subsets. T(H)1 cells are necessary to clear intracellular pathogens and T(H)2 cells are important for clearing extracellular organisms. Recently, a subset of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T (T(H)17) cells distinct from T(H)1 or T(H)2 cells has been described and shown to have a crucial role in the induction of autoimmune tissue injury. In contrast, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (T(reg)) cells inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue injury. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a critical differentiation factor for the generation of T(reg) cells. Here we show, using mice with a reporter introduced into the endogenous Foxp3 locus, that IL-6, an acute phase protein induced during inflammation, completely inhibits the generation of Foxp3+ T(reg) cells induced by TGF-beta. We also demonstrate that IL-23 is not the differentiation factor for the generation of T(H)17 cells. Instead, IL-6 and TGF-beta together induce the differentiation of pathogenic T(H)17 cells from naive T cells. Our data demonstrate a dichotomy in the generation of pathogenic (T(H)17) T cells that induce autoimmunity and regulatory (Foxp3+) T cells that inhibit autoimmune tissue injury.
Publication
Journal: Nature immunology
April/22/2003
Abstract
CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. Here we report that the forkhead transcription factor Foxp3 is specifically expressed in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and is required for their development. The lethal autoimmune syndrome observed in Foxp3-mutant scurfy mice and Foxp3-null mice results from a CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell deficiency and not from a cell-intrinsic defect of CD4+CD25- T cells. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells rescue disease development and preferentially expand when transferred into neonatal Foxp3-deficient mice. Furthermore, ectopic expression of Foxp3 confers suppressor function on peripheral CD4+CD25- T cells. Thus, Foxp3 is a critical regulator of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell development and function.
Publication
Journal: Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
September/11/1995
Abstract
Approximately 10% of peripheral CD4+ cells and less than 1% of CD8+ cells in normal unimmunized adult mice express the IL-2 receptor alpha-chain (CD25) molecules. When CD4+ cell suspensions prepared from BALB/c nu/+ mice lymph nodes and spleens were depleted of CD25+ cells by specific mAb and C, and then inoculated into BALB/c athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, all recipients spontaneously developed histologically and serologically evident autoimmune diseases (such as thyroiditis, gastritis, insulitis, sialoadenitis, adrenalitis, oophoritis, glomerulonephritis, and polyarthritis); some mice also developed graft-vs-host-like wasting disease. Reconstitution of CD4+CD25+ cells within a limited period after transfer of CD4+CD25- cells prevented these autoimmune developments in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas the reconstitution several days later, or inoculation of an equivalent dose of CD8+ cells, was far less efficient for the prevention. When nu/nu mice were transplanted with allogeneic skins or immunized with xenogeneic proteins at the time of CD25- cell inoculation, they showed significantly heightened immune responses to the skins or proteins, and reconstitution of CD4+CD25+ cells normalized the responses. Taken together, these results indicate that CD4+CD25+ cells contribute to maintaining self-tolerance by down-regulating immune response to self and non-self Ags in an Ag-nonspecific manner, presumably at the T cell activation stage; elimination/reduction of CD4+CD25+ cells relieves this general suppression, thereby not only enhancing immune responses to non-self Ags, but also eliciting autoimmune responses to certain self-Ags. Abnormality of this T cell-mediated mechanism of peripheral tolerance can be a possible cause of various autoimmune diseases.
Publication
Journal: Annual review of immunology
May/25/2009
Abstract
CD4+ T cells, upon activation and expansion, develop into different T helper cell subsets with different cytokine profiles and distinct effector functions. Until recently, T cells were divided into Th1 or Th2 cells, depending on the cytokines they produce. A third subset of IL-17-producing effector T helper cells, called Th17 cells, has now been discovered and characterized. Here, we summarize the current information on the differentiation and effector functions of the Th17 lineage. Th17 cells produce IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22, thereby inducing a massive tissue reaction owing to the broad distribution of the IL-17 and IL-22 receptors. Th17 cells also secrete IL-21 to communicate with the cells of the immune system. The differentiation factors (TGF-beta plus IL-6 or IL-21), the growth and stabilization factor (IL-23), and the transcription factors (STAT3, RORgammat, and RORalpha) involved in the development of Th17 cells have just been identified. The participation of TGF-beta in the differentiation of Th17 cells places the Th17 lineage in close relationship with CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), as TGF-beta also induces differentiation of naive T cells into Foxp3+ Tregs in the peripheral immune compartment. The investigation of the differentiation, effector function, and regulation of Th17 cells has opened up a new framework for understanding T cell differentiation. Furthermore, we now appreciate the importance of Th17 cells in clearing pathogens during host defense reactions and in inducing tissue inflammation in autoimmune disease.
Publication
Journal: The Journal of experimental medicine
January/21/2004
Abstract
CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) are instrumental in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. One critical question is whether Treg can only be generated in the thymus or can differentiate from peripheral CD4+CD25- naive T cells. In this paper, we present novel evidence that conversion of naive peripheral CD4+CD25- T cells into anergic/suppressor cells that are CD25+, CD45RB-/low and intracellular CTLA-4+ can be achieved through costimulation with T cell receptors (TCRs) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Although transcription factor Foxp3 has been shown recently to be associated with the development of Treg, the physiological inducers for Foxp3 gene expression remain a mystery. TGF-beta induced Foxp3 gene expression in TCR-challenged CD4+CD25- naive T cells, which mediated their transition toward a regulatory T cell phenotype with potent immunosuppressive potential. These converted anergic/suppressor cells are not only unresponsive to TCR stimulation and produce neither T helper cell 1 nor T helper cell 2 cytokines but they also express TGF-beta and inhibit normal T cell proliferation in vitro. More importantly, in an ovalbumin peptide TCR transgenic adoptive transfer model, TGF-beta-converted transgenic CD4+CD25+ suppressor cells proliferated in response to immunization and inhibited antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell expansion in vivo. Finally, in a murine asthma model, coadministration of these TGF-beta-induced suppressor T cells prevented house dust mite-induced allergic pathogenesis in lungs.
Publication
Journal: Nature immunology
November/14/2005
Abstract
Interleukin 17 (IL-17) has been linked to autoimmune diseases, although its regulation and function have remained unclear. Here we have evaluated in vitro and in vivo the requirements for the differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into effector T helper cells that produce IL-17. This process required the costimulatory molecules CD28 and ICOS but was independent of the cytokines and transcription factors required for T helper type 1 or type 2 differentiation. Furthermore, both IL-4 and interferon-gamma negatively regulated T helper cell production of IL-17 in the effector phase. In vivo, antibody to IL-17 inhibited chemokine expression in the brain during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas overexpression of IL-17 in lung epithelium caused chemokine production and leukocyte infiltration. Thus, IL-17 expression characterizes a unique T helper lineage that regulates tissue inflammation.
Publication
Journal: Nature medicine
December/19/2004
Abstract
Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells mediate homeostatic peripheral tolerance by suppressing autoreactive T cells. Failure of host antitumor immunity may be caused by exaggerated suppression of tumor-associated antigen-reactive lymphocytes mediated by T(reg) cells; however, definitive evidence that T(reg) cells have an immunopathological role in human cancer is lacking. Here we show, in detailed studies of CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) T(reg) cells in 104 individuals affected with ovarian carcinoma, that human tumor T(reg) cells suppress tumor-specific T cell immunity and contribute to growth of human tumors in vivo. We also show that tumor T(reg) cells are associated with a high death hazard and reduced survival. Human T(reg) cells preferentially move to and accumulate in tumors and ascites, but rarely enter draining lymph nodes in later cancer stages. Tumor cells and microenvironmental macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which mediates trafficking of T(reg) cells to the tumor. This specific recruitment of T(reg) cells represents a mechanism by which tumors may foster immune privilege. Thus, blocking T(reg) cell migration or function may help to defeat human cancer.
Publication
Journal: Immunity
March/22/2006
Abstract
We describe de novo generation of IL-17-producing T cells from naive CD4 T cells, induced in cocultures of naive CD4 T cells and naturally occurring CD4+ CD25+ T cells (Treg) in the presence of TLR3, TLR4, or TLR9 stimuli. Treg can be substituted by TGFbeta1, which, together with the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, supports the differentiation of IL-17-producing T cells, a process that is amplified by IL-1beta and TNFalpha. We could not detect a role for IL-23 in the differentiation of IL-17-producing T cells but confirmed its importance for their survival and expansion. Transcription factors GATA-3 and T-bet, as well as its target Hlx, are absent in IL-17-producing T cells, and they do not express the negative regulator for TGFbeta signaling, Smad7. Our data indicate that, in the presence of IL-6, TGFbeta1 subverts Th1 and Th2 differentiation for the generation of IL-17-producing T cells.
Publication
Journal: Annual review of immunology
June/11/2008
Abstract
Programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, deliver inhibitory signals that regulate the balance between T cell activation, tolerance, and immunopathology. Immune responses to foreign and self-antigens require specific and balanced responses to clear pathogens and tumors and yet maintain tolerance. Induction and maintenance of T cell tolerance requires PD-1, and its ligand PD-L1 on nonhematopoietic cells can limit effector T cell responses and protect tissues from immune-mediated tissue damage. The PD-1:PD-L pathway also has been usurped by microorganisms and tumors to attenuate antimicrobial or tumor immunity and facilitate chronic infection and tumor survival. The identification of B7-1 as an additional binding partner for PD-L1, together with the discovery of an inhibitory bidirectional interaction between PD-L1 and B7-1, reveals new ways the B7:CD28 family regulates T cell activation and tolerance. In this review, we discuss current understanding of the immunoregulatory functions of PD-1 and its ligands and their therapeutic potential.
Publication
Journal: The Journal of experimental medicine
November/7/2000
Abstract
PD-1 is an immunoinhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells. Mice deficient in PD-1 exhibit a breakdown of peripheral tolerance and demonstrate multiple autoimmune features. We report here that the ligand of PD-1 (PD-L1) is a member of the B7 gene family. Engagement of PD-1 by PD-L1 leads to the inhibition of T cell receptor-mediated lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine secretion. In addition, PD-1 signaling can inhibit at least suboptimal levels of CD28-mediated costimulation. PD-L1 is expressed by antigen-presenting cells, including human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with interferon gamma, and activated human and murine dendritic cells. In addition, PD-L1 is expressed in nonlymphoid tissues such as heart and lung. The relative levels of inhibitory PD-L1 and costimulatory B7-1/B7-2 signals on antigen-presenting cells may determine the extent of T cell activation and consequently the threshold between tolerance and autoimmunity. PD-L1 expression on nonlymphoid tissues and its potential interaction with PD-1 may subsequently determine the extent of immune responses at sites of inflammation.
Publication
Journal: Annual review of immunology
August/1/2004
Abstract
Naturally occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells, the majority of which express CD25, are engaged in dominant control of self-reactive T cells, contributing to the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. Their depletion or functional alteration leads to the development of autoimmune disease in otherwise normal animals. The majority, if not all, of such CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells are produced by the normal thymus as a functionally distinct and mature subpopulation of T cells. Their repertoire of antigen specificities is as broad as that of naive T cells, and they are capable of recognizing both self and nonself antigens, thus enabling them to control various immune responses. In addition to antigen recognition, signals through various accessory molecules and via cytokines control their activation, expansion, and survival, and tune their suppressive activity. Furthermore, the generation of CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells in the immune system is at least in part developmentally and genetically controlled. Genetic defects that primarily affect their development or function can indeed be a primary cause of autoimmune and other inflammatory disorders in humans. Based on recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this T cell-mediated immune regulation, this review discusses how naturally arising CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells contribute to the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and negative control of various immune responses, and how they can be exploited to prevent and treat autoimmune disease, allergy, cancer, and chronic infection, or establish donor-specific transplantation tolerance.
Publication
Journal: Immunity
May/2/2005
Abstract
Regulatory T cell-mediated dominant tolerance has been demonstrated to play an important role in the prevention of autoimmunity. Here, we present data arguing that the forkhead transcription factor Foxp3 acts as the regulatory T cell lineage specification factor and mediator of the genetic mechanism of dominant tolerance. We show that expression of Foxp3 is highly restricted to the subset alphabeta of T cells and, irrespective of CD25 expression, correlates with suppressor activity. Induction of Foxp3 expression in nonregulatory T cells does not occur during pathogen-driven immune responses, and Foxp3 deficiency does not impact the functional responses of nonregulatory T cells. Furthermore, T cell-specific ablation of Foxp3 is sufficient to induce the identical early onset lymphoproliferative syndrome observed in Foxp3-deficient mice. Analysis of Foxp3 expression during thymic development suggests that this mechanism is not hard-wired but is dependent on TCR/MHC ligand interactions.
Publication
Journal: Nature immunology
April/22/2003
Abstract
The molecular properties that characterize CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (TR cells) remain elusive. Absence of the transcription factor Scurfin (also known as forkhead box P3 and encoded by Foxp3) causes a rapidly fatal lymphoproliferative disease, similar to that seen in mice lacking cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Here we show that Foxp3 is highly expressed by T(R) cells and is associated with T(R) cell activity and phenotype. Scurfin-deficient mice lack T(R) cells, whereas mice that overexpress Foxp3 possess more T(R) cells. In Foxp3-overexpressing mice, both CD4+CD25- and CD4-CD8+ T cells show suppressive activity and CD4+CD25- cells express glucocorticoid-induced tumor-necrosis factor receptor-related (GITR) protein. The forced expression of Foxp3 also delays disease in CTLA-4-/- mice, indicating that the Scurfin and CTLA-4 pathways may intersect and providing further insight into the T(R) cell lineage.
Publication
Journal: The Journal of experimental medicine
August/21/2006
Abstract
Regulatory T (T reg) cells are critical regulators of immune tolerance. Most T reg cells are defined based on expression of CD4, CD25, and the transcription factor, FoxP3. However, these markers have proven problematic for uniquely defining this specialized T cell subset in humans. We found that the IL-7 receptor (CD127) is down-regulated on a subset of CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood. We demonstrate that the majority of these cells are FoxP3(+), including those that express low levels or no CD25. A combination of CD4, CD25, and CD127 resulted in a highly purified population of T reg cells accounting for significantly more cells that previously identified based on other cell surface markers. These cells were highly suppressive in functional suppressor assays. In fact, cells separated based solely on CD4 and CD127 expression were anergic and, although representing at least three times the number of cells (including both CD25(+)CD4(+) and CD25(-)CD4(+) T cell subsets), were as suppressive as the "classic" CD4(+)CD25(hi) T reg cell subset. Finally, we show that CD127 can be used to quantitate T reg cell subsets in individuals with type 1 diabetes supporting the use of CD127 as a biomarker for human T reg cells.
Publication
Journal: Nature immunology
April/18/2005
Abstract
Naturally arising CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells actively maintain immunological self-tolerance. Deficiency in or dysfunction of these cells can be a cause of autoimmune disease. A reduction in their number or function can also elicit tumor immunity, whereas their antigen-specific population expansion can establish transplantation tolerance. They are therefore a good target for designing ways to induce or abrogate immunological tolerance to self and non-self antigens.
Publication
Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.)
December/17/1997
Abstract
Natural killer T (NKT) lymphocytes express an invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR) encoded by the Valpha14 and Jalpha281 gene segments. A glycosylceramide-containing alpha-anomeric sugar with a longer fatty acyl chain (C26) and sphingosine base (C18) was identified as a ligand for this TCR. Glycosylceramide-mediated proliferative responses of Valpha14 NKT cells were abrogated by treatment with chloroquine-concanamycin A or by monoclonal antibodies against CD1d/Vbeta8, CD40/CD40L, or B7/CTLA-4/CD28, but not by interference with the function of a transporter-associated protein. Thus, this lymphocyte shares distinct recognition systems with either T or NK cells.
Publication
Journal: The Journal of experimental medicine
August/10/1998
Abstract
Peripheral tolerance may be maintained by a population of regulatory/suppressor T cells that prevent the activation of autoreactive T cells recognizing tissue-specific antigens. We have previously shown that CD4+CD25+ T cells represent a unique population of suppressor T cells that can prevent both the initiation of organ-specific autoimmune disease after day 3 thymectomy and the effector function of cloned autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells. To analyze the mechanism of action of these cells, we established an in vitro model system that mimics the function of these cells in vivo. Purified CD4+CD25+ cells failed to proliferate after stimulation with interleukin (IL)-2 alone or stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR). When cocultured with CD4+CD25- cells, the CD4+CD25+ cells markedly suppressed proliferation by specifically inhibiting the production of IL-2. The inhibition was not cytokine mediated, was dependent on cell contact between the regulatory cells and the responders, and required activation of the suppressors via the TCR. Inhibition could be overcome by the addition to the cultures of IL-2 or anti-CD28, suggesting that the CD4+CD25+ cells may function by blocking the delivery of a costimulatory signal. Induction of CD25 expression on CD25- T cells in vitro or in vivo did not result in the generation of suppressor activity. Collectively, these data support the concept that the CD4+CD25+ T cells in normal mice may represent a distinct lineage of "professional" suppressor cells.
Publication
Journal: Annual review of immunology
June/29/2005
Abstract
The discovery of new functions for the original B7 family members, together with the identification of additional B7 and CD28 family members, have revealed new ways in which the B7:CD28 family regulates T cell activation and tolerance. B7-1/B7-2:CD28 interactions not only promote initial T cell activation but also regulate self-tolerance by supporting CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cell homeostasis. CTLA-4 can exert its inhibitory effects in both B7-1/B7-2 dependent and independent fashions. B7-1 and B7-2 can signal bidirectionally by engaging CD28 and CTLA-4 on T cells and by delivering signals into B7-expressing cells. The five new B7 family members, ICOS ligand, PD-L1 (B7-H1), PD-L2 (B7-DC), B7-H3, and B7-H4 (B7x/B7-S1) are expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells as well as on cells within nonlymphoid organs, providing new means for regulating T cell activation and tolerance in peripheral tissues. The new CD28 families members, ICOS, PD-1, and BTLA, are inducibly expressed on T cells, and they have important roles in regulating previously activated T cells. PD-1 and BTLA also are expressed on B cells and may have broader immunoregulatory functions. The ICOS:ICOSL pathway appears to be particularly important for stimulating effector T cell responses and T cell-dependent B cell responses, but it also has an important role in regulating T cell tolerance. In addition, the PD-1:PD-L1/PD-L2 pathway plays a critical role in regulating T cell activation and tolerance. In this review, we revisit the roles of the B7:CD28 family members in regulating immune responses, and we discuss their therapeutic potential.
Publication
Journal: The Journal of experimental medicine
December/12/2007
Abstract
The study of T regulatory cells (T reg cells) has been limited by the lack of specific surface markers and an inability to define mechanisms of suppression. We show that the expression of CD39/ENTPD1 in concert with CD73/ecto-5'-nucleotidase distinguishes CD4(+)/CD25(+)/Foxp3(+) T reg cells from other T cells. These ectoenzymes generate pericellular adenosine from extracellular nucleotides. The coordinated expression of CD39/CD73 on T reg cells and the adenosine A2A receptor on activated T effector cells generates immunosuppressive loops, indicating roles in the inhibitory function of T reg cells. Consequently, T reg cells from Cd39-null mice show impaired suppressive properties in vitro and fail to block allograft rejection in vivo. We conclude that CD39 and CD73 are surface markers of T reg cells that impart a specific biochemical signature characterized by adenosine generation that has functional relevance for cellular immunoregulation.
Publication
Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.)
April/16/1996
Abstract
One reason for the poor immunogenicity of many tumors may be that they cannot provide signals for CD28-mediated costimulation necessary to fully activate T cells. It has recently become apparent that CTLA-4, a second counterreceptor for the B7 family of costimulatory molecules, is a negative regulator of T cell activation. Here, in vivo administration of antibodies to CTLA-4 resulted in the rejection of tumors, including preestablished tumors. Furthermore, this rejection resulted in immunity to a secondary exposure to tumor cells. These results suggest that blockade of the inhibitory effects of CTLA-4 can allow for, and potentiate, effective immune responses against tumor cells.
Publication
Journal: Immunity
December/25/1995
Abstract
The B7-CD28/CTLA-4 costimulatory pathway can provide a signal pivotal for T cell activation. Signaling through this pathway is complex due to the presence of two B7 family members, B7-1 and B7-2, and two counterreceptors, CD28 and CTLA-4. Studies with anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibodies have suggested both positive and negative roles for CTLA-4 in T cell activation. To elucidate the in vivo function of CTLA-4, we generated CTLA-4-deficient mice. These mice rapidly develop lymphoproliferative disease with multiorgan lymphocytic infiltration and tissue destruction, with particularly severe myocarditis and pancreatitis, and die by 3-4 weeks of age. The phenotype of the CTLA-4-deficient mouse strain is supported by studies that have suggested a negative role for CTLA-4 in T cell activation. The severe phenotype of mice lacking CTLA-4 implies a critical role for CTLA-4 in down-regulating T cell activation and maintaining immunologic homeostasis. In the absence of CTLA-4, peripheral T cells are activated, can spontaneously proliferate, and may mediate lethal tissue injury.
Publication
Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.)
March/2/2003
Abstract
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) control activation of adaptive immune responses by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, initiation of adaptive immune responses is also controlled by regulatory T cells (TR cells), which act to prevent activation of autoreactive T cells. Here we describe a second mechanism of immune induction by TLRs, which is independent of effects on costimulation. Microbial induction of the Toll pathway blocked the suppressive effect of CD4+CD25+ TR cells, allowing activation of pathogen-specific adaptive immune responses. This block of suppressor activity was dependent in part on interleukin-6, which was induced by TLRs upon recognition of microbial products.
Publication
Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.)
December/1/1997
Abstract
In evaluating current combination drug regimens for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, it is important to determine the existence of viral reservoirs. After depletion of CD8 cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of both patients and normal donors, activation of patient CD4 lymphocytes with immobilized antibodies to CD3 and CD28 enabled the isolation of virus from PBMCs of six patients despite the suppression of their plasma HIV RNA to fewer than 50 copies per milliliter for up to 2 years. Partial sequencing of HIV pol revealed no new drug resistance mutations or discernible evolution, providing evidence for viral latency rather than drug failure.
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