Neurotrophin-regulated signalling pathways.
Journal: 2007/April - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8436
Abstract:
Neurotrophins are a family of closely related proteins that were identified initially as survival factors for sensory and sympathetic neurons, and have since been shown to control many aspects of survival, development and function of neurons in both the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Each of the four mammalian neurotrophins has been shown to activate one or more of the three members of the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC). In addition, each neurotrophin activates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily. Through Trk receptors, neurotrophins activate Ras, phosphatidyl inositol-3 (PI3)-kinase, phospholipase C-gamma1 and signalling pathways controlled through these proteins, such as the MAP kinases. Activation of p75NTR results in activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and Jun kinase as well as other signalling pathways. Limiting quantities of neurotrophins during development control the number of surviving neurons to ensure a match between neurons and the requirement for a suitable density of target innervation. The neurotrophins also regulate cell fate decisions, axon growth, dendrite growth and pruning and the expression of proteins, such as ion channels, transmitter biosynthetic enzymes and neuropeptide transmitters that are essential for normal neuronal function. Continued presence of the neurotrophins is required in the adult nervous system, where they control synaptic function and plasticity, and sustain neuronal survival, morphology and differentiation. They also have additional, subtler roles outside the nervous system. In recent years, three rare human genetic disorders, which result in deleterious effects on sensory perception, cognition and a variety of behaviours, have been shown to be attributable to mutations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and two of the Trk receptors.
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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361(1473): 1545-1564

Neurotrophin-regulated signalling pathways

Neuroscience Program, Department of Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 1550 Fourth Street, Rock Hall 284a, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA
(ude.fscu.lgc@rfl)
Neuroscience Program, Department of Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, 1550 Fourth Street, Rock Hall 284a, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA

Abstract

Neurotrophins are a family of closely related proteins that were identified initially as survival factors for sensory and sympathetic neurons, and have since been shown to control many aspects of survival, development and function of neurons in both the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Each of the four mammalian neurotrophins has been shown to activate one or more of the three members of the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC). In addition, each neurotrophin activates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily. Through Trk receptors, neurotrophins activate Ras, phosphatidyl inositol-3 (PI3)-kinase, phospholipase C-γ1 and signalling pathways controlled through these proteins, such as the MAP kinases. Activation of p75NTR results in activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and Jun kinase as well as other signalling pathways. Limiting quantities of neurotrophins during development control the number of surviving neurons to ensure a match between neurons and the requirement for a suitable density of target innervation. The neurotrophins also regulate cell fate decisions, axon growth, dendrite growth and pruning and the expression of proteins, such as ion channels, transmitter biosynthetic enzymes and neuropeptide transmitters that are essential for normal neuronal function. Continued presence of the neurotrophins is required in the adult nervous system, where they control synaptic function and plasticity, and sustain neuronal survival, morphology and differentiation. They also have additional, subtler roles outside the nervous system. In recent years, three rare human genetic disorders, which result in deleterious effects on sensory perception, cognition and a variety of behaviours, have been shown to be attributable to mutations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and two of the Trk receptors.

Keywords: neurotrophin, Trk receptor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, apoptosis, nerve growth factor
Abstract

Acknowledgments

Work from the author's laboratory has been supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the United States National Institutes of Health. I have benefited greatly from conversations with many members of my laboratory. I especially wish to acknowledge Dr Eric Huang who has shaped my thoughts over several years during composition of previous reviews on this subject.

Acknowledgments

Footnotes

One contribution of 13 to a Theme Issue ‘The regenerating brain’.

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