Best match
All
Search in:AllTitleAbstractAuthor name
Publications
(93)
Patents
Grants
Pathways
Clinical trials
Publication
Journal: Cephalalgia
February/10/2003
Abstract
Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew), is a well-known herb for the prophylactic treatment of migraine. The primary objective was to show a dose-response of a new stable extract (MIG-99) reproducibly manufactured with supercritical CO2 from feverfew (T. parthenium). Furthermore, the study should provide data on the safety and tolerability of MIG-99. In a randomized, double-blind, multicentre, controlled trial with an adaptive design, the clinical efficacy and safety of three dosages of MIG-99 (2.08 mg; 6.25 mg; 18.75 mg t.i.d.) were compared with placebo. The patients (n = 147) suffered from migraine with and without aura according to International Headache Society (IHS) criteria and were treated with one of the study medications for 12 weeks after a 4-week baseline period. The primary efficacy parameter was the number of migraine attacks during the last 28 days of the treatment period compared with baseline. Secondary endpoints were total and average duration and intensity of migraine attacks, mean duration of the single attack, number of days with accompanying migraine symptoms, number of days with inability to work due to migraine as well as type and amount of additionally taken medications for the treatment of migraine attacks. The design of the study included a pre-planned adaptive interim analysis for patients with at least four migraine attacks within the baseline period. With respect to the primary and secondary efficacy parameter, a statistically significant difference was not found between the overall and the confirmatory intention-to-treat (ITT) sample in the exploratorily analysed four treatment groups. The frequency of migraine attacks for the predefined confirmatory subgroup of patients (n = 49) with at least four migraine attacks during the baseline period decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P = 0.001). The highest absolute change of migraine attacks was observed under treatment with 6.25 mg t.i.d. (mean +/- SD = -1.8 +/- 1.5 per 28 days) compared with placebo (-0.3 +/- 1.9; P = 0.02). Overall, 52 of 147 (35%) patients reported at least one adverse event (AE). The incidence of AEs in the active treatment groups was similar to that in the placebo group, and no dose-related effect was observed in any safety parameter. MIG-99 failed to show a significant migraine prophylactic effect in general. Accordingly, in the ITT analysis a dose-response relationship could not be observed. MIG-99 was shown to be effective only in a small predefined subgroup of patients with at least four attacks during the 28-day baseline period where the most favourable benefit-risk ratio was observed with a dosage of three capsules of 6.25 mg MIG-99 extract per day. Because of the low number of patients, these findings need to be verified in a larger sample. The incidence of AEs was similar for all treatment groups.
Publication
Journal: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
July/4/2001
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) is a popular herbal remedy for migraine.
OBJECTIVE
To systematically review the evidence for or against the efficacy of feverfew versus placebo for the prevention of migraine.
METHODS
Electronic literature searches were performed using the databases CISCOM (Research Council for Complementary Medicine, London, UK), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biosis and the Cochrane Library (each from its inception to April 1998). Manufacturers were contacted and the bibliographies of identified articles checked for further trials.
METHODS
Randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing the efficacy of feverfew for preventing migraine were included. No restrictions regarding the language of publication were imposed.
METHODS
Data on patients, interventions, methods, outcomes and results were extracted in a pre-defined, standardised manner. Methodological quality was evaluated using the scoring system developed by Jadad and colleagues. Both data extraction and the assessment of methodological quality were performed independently by two reviewers.
RESULTS
Four trials met the inclusion criteria. The majority of these trials suggested beneficial effects of feverfew compared with placebo. However, the trial with the highest methodological quality, which was also among the largest, found no significant difference between feverfew and placebo.
CONCLUSIONS
The efficacy of feverfew for the prevention of migraine has not been established beyond reasonable doubt.
Publication
Journal: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
June/28/2004
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) extract is a herbal remedy used for preventing attacks of migraine.
OBJECTIVE
To systematically review the evidence from double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the clinical efficacy and safety of feverfew versus placebo for preventing migraine.
METHODS
Publications describing (or which might describe) double-blind RCTs of feverfew extract for migraine were sought through the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2003); PREMEDLINE/MEDLINE (1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (1974 to July 2003); the trials register of the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive care group (July 2003); and AMED (1985 to July 2003). Manufacturers of feverfew were contacted and the bibliographies of identified articles checked for further trials.
METHODS
Randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing the efficacy of feverfew for preventing migraine were included. Trials using clinical outcome measures were included. Trials focusing exclusively on physiological parameters were excluded. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication.
METHODS
Data on patients, interventions, methods, outcome measures, results and adverse events were extracted systematically. Methodological quality was evaluated using the scoring system developed by Jadad and colleagues. Two reviewers independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Disagreements concerning evaluation of individual trials were resolved through discussion.
RESULTS
Five trials (343 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Results from these trials were mixed and did not convincingly establish that feverfew is efficacious for preventing migraine. Only mild and transient adverse events were reported in the included trials.
CONCLUSIONS
There is insufficient evidence from randomised, double-blind trials to suggest an effect of feverfew over and above placebo for preventing migraine. It appears from the data reviewed that feverfew presents no major safety problems.
Publication
Journal: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
April/21/2015
Abstract
BACKGROUND
This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on 'Feverfew for preventing migraine' (2004, Issue 1). Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) extract is a herbal remedy, which has been used for preventing attacks of migraine.
OBJECTIVE
To systematically review the evidence from double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the clinical efficacy and safety of feverfew monopreparations versus placebo for preventing migraine.
METHODS
For this updated version of the review we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and AMED to January 2015. We contacted manufacturers of feverfew and checked the bibliographies of identified articles for further trials.
METHODS
We included randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing the efficacy of feverfew monopreparations for preventing migraine in patients of any age. We included trials using clinical outcome measures, while we excluded trials focusing exclusively on physiological parameters. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication.
METHODS
We systematically extracted data on patients, interventions, methods, outcome measures, results and adverse events. We assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and evaluated methodological quality using the Oxford Quality Scale developed by Jadad and colleagues. Two review authors (BW and MHP for this update, MHP and EE for the original version) independently selected studies, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. We resolved disagreements concerning evaluation of individual trials through discussion.
RESULTS
We identified one new study for this update, resulting in six trials (561 patients) meeting the inclusion criteria. Five of the six trials reported on the main outcome, migraine frequency. Although five of the trials were generally of good methodological quality, all studies were either of unclear or high risk of bias with regards to sample size. Pooled analysis of the results was not possible due to the lack of common outcome measures and heterogeneity between studies in terms of participants, interventions and designs.The most recent trial added to this version of the review is rigorous and larger (n = 218), using a stable feverfew extract at a dose determined by a previous dose-finding trial. It reports that feverfew reduced migraine frequency by 1.9 attacks from 4.8 to 2.9 and placebo by 1.3 from to 4.8 to 3.5 per month, resulting in a difference in effect between feverfew and placebo of 0.6 attacks per month. For the secondary outcome measures intensity and duration of migraine attacks, incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting, and global assessment no statistically significant differences were reported. Results of previous trials are not convincing: three trials reporting positive effects of feverfew are all of small sample size (17 to 60 participants), while two rigorous trials (n = 50, 147) did not find significant differences between feverfew and placebo. Only mild and transient adverse events, most commonly gastrointestinal complaints and mouth ulcers, were reported in the included trials.
CONCLUSIONS
Since the last version of this review, one larger rigorous study has been included, reporting a difference in effect between feverfew and placebo of 0.6 attacks per month. This adds some positive evidence to the mixed and inconclusive findings of the previous review. However, this constitutes low quality evidence, which needs to be confirmed in larger rigorous trials with stable feverfew extracts and clearly defined migraine populations before firm conclusions can be drawn. It appears from the data reviewed that feverfew is not associated with any major safety concerns.
Publication
Journal: Headache
July/25/2006
Publication
Journal: Clinical Drug Investigation
March/15/2007
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew) has been used traditionally to treat migraine, and although its mechanism of action is not fully understood, serotonin 5-HT receptor blocking effects have been suggested. T. parthenium and Salix alba (white willow) either alone or in combination (Mig-RL) were recently shown to inhibit binding to 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors; T. parthenium failed to recognise 5-HT(1D) receptors, whereas S. alba or the combination did. It was hypothesised that S. alba in combination with T. parthenium may provide superior migraine prophylactic activity compared with T. parthenium alone.
METHODS
A prospective, open-label study was performed in 12 patients diagnosed with migraine without aura. Twelve weeks' treatment with T. parthenium 300 mg plus S. alba 300 mg (Mig-RL) twice daily was administered to determine the effects of therapy on migraine attack frequency (primary efficacy criterion), intensity and duration (secondary efficacy criteria), and quality of life, together with tolerability for patients.
RESULTS
Attack frequency was reduced by 57.2% at 6 weeks (p < 0.029) and by 61.7% at 12 weeks (p < 0.025) in nine of ten patients, with 70% patients having a reduction of at least 50%. Attack intensity was reduced by 38.7% at 6 weeks (p < 0.005) and by 62.6% at 12 weeks (p < 0.004) in ten of ten patients, with 70% of patients having a reduction of at least 50%. Attack duration decreased by 67.2% at 6 weeks (p < 0.001) and by 76.2% at 12 weeks (p < 0.001) in ten of ten patients. Two patients were excluded for reasons unrelated to treatment. Self-assessed general health, physical performance, memory and anxiety also improved by the end of the study. Mig-RL treatment was well tolerated and no adverse events occurred.
CONCLUSIONS
The remarkable efficacy of Mig-RL in not only reducing the frequency of migraine attacks but also their pain intensity and duration in this trial warrants further investigation of this therapy in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled investigation involving a larger patient population.
Publication
Journal: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska
April/25/2000
Abstract
Feverfew has been used in traditional medicine in the treatment of migraine for a long time. In 1985 E.S. Johnson et al. and later J.J. Murphy et al., 1988 and B.K. Vogler et al., 1994 published positive results of prophylactic use of this herb in migraine. Since 1994 through 1996 we studied in our Centre of Migraine Therapy the efficacy of feverfew in migraine treatment. We had 24 patients (women 19-61 years old) in our group. The drug was administered once daily (5 ml of the sap) for 30-60 days. We observed significant reduction of Migraine Index in 8 patients, less significant in additional 5. Our results confirm that feverfew may be beneficial in migraine prophylaxis as an additive drug. Further controlled studies need to be done, especially to establish the optimal dose of the drug.
Publication
Journal: Journal of Dietary Supplements
September/4/2013
Abstract
Feverfew has been studied for the treatment of migrane in several studies and the pharmacologic mechanisms are preliminarily understood. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and present the clinical findings and potential implications. The modality of data collection and reporting in the individual studies does not support a pooling of results, but does suggest benefit of feverfew in migraine prophylaxis for at least subsets of the population with the disorder. Pharmacologically, there is some potential for concern with long-term dosing given its cyclooxygenase-2 inhibiting effects and longer-term studies will be needed to ameliorate these concerns in coronary disease patients.
Publication
Journal: British medical journal (Clinical research ed.)
November/3/1985
Abstract
Seventeen patients who ate fresh leaves of feverfew daily as prophylaxis against migraine participated in a double blind placebo controlled trial of the herb: eight patients received capsules containing freeze dried feverfew powder and nine placebo. Those who received placebo had a significant increase in the frequency and severity of headache, nausea, and vomiting with the emergence of untoward effects during the early months of treatment. The group given capsules of feverfew showed no change in the frequency or severity of symptoms of migraine. This provides evidence that feverfew taken prophylactically prevents attacks of migraine, and confirmatory studies are now indicated, preferably with a formulation controlled for sesquiterpene lactone content, in migraine sufferers who have never treated themselves with this herb.
Publication
Journal: British medical journal (Clinical research ed.)
January/15/1986
Authors
Publication
Journal: The Lancet
October/28/1982
Publication
Journal: British medical journal (Clinical research ed.)
December/3/1985
Publication
Journal: Cephalalgia
August/24/2005
Abstract
Tanacetum parthenium (TP) is a member of the Asteracee family long used empirically as a herbal remedy for migraine. So far, however, clinical trials have failed to prove consistently the effectiveness of TP extracts in preventing migraine attacks, probably as a consequence of the uncertainty as regards the active principle. In this study, the biological effects of different TP extracts and purified parthenolide were tested in an animal model of migraine based on the quantification of neuronal activation induced by nitroglycerin. The extract enriched in parthenolide significantly reduced nitroglycerin-induced Fos expression in the nucleus trigeminalis caudalis. Purified parthenolide inhibited nitroglycerin-induced neuronal activation in additional brain nuclei and, significantly, the activity of nuclear factor-kappaB. These findings strongly suggest that parthenolide is the component responsible for the biological activity of TP as regards its antimigraine effect and provide important information for future controlled clinical trials.
Publication
Journal: Food and Chemical Toxicology
September/6/2019
Abstract
Migraine is one of the most common neurological disorder, which has long been related to brain serotonin (5-HT) depletion and neuro-inflammation. Despite many treatment options are available, the frequent occurrence of unacceptable adverse effects further supports the research toward nutraceuticals and herbal preparations, among which Tanacetum parthenium and Salix alba showed promising anti-inflammatory and neuro-modulatory activities. The impact of extract treatment on astrocyte viability, spontaneous migration and apoptosis was evaluated. Anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant effects were investigated on isolated rat cortexes exposed to a neurotoxic stimulus. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, nitrite levels and 5-HT turnover were evaluated, as well. A proteomic analysis was focused on specific neuronal proteins and a fingerprint analysis was carried out on selected phenolic compounds. Both extracts appeared able to exert in vitro anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects. S. alba and T. parthenium extracts reduced LDH release, nitrite levels and 5-HT turnover induced by neurotoxic stimulus. The downregulation of selected proteins suggest a neurotoxicity, which could be ascribed to an elevated content of gallic acid in both S. alba and T. parthenium extracts. Concluding, both extracts exert neuroprotective effects, although the downregulation of key proteins involved in neuron physiology suggest caution in their use as food supplements.
Publication
Journal: Cephalalgia
April/12/1999
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Feverfew is a popular herbal remedy advocated for the prevention of migraine.
OBJECTIVE
The aim of this systematic review was to look at the evidence for or against the clinical effectiveness of feverfew in migraine prevention.
METHODS
Literature searches were performed using the following databases: Medline, Embase, Biosis, CISCOM, and the Cochrane Library (all from their inception to April 1998).
METHODS
Only randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials were included.
METHODS
All articles were read by two independent reviewers. Data were extracted in a predefined, standardized fashion. The methodological quality of all trials was evaluated using the Jadad score.
RESULTS
Five trials met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. The majority favor feverfew over placebo. Yet important caveats exist.
CONCLUSIONS
The clinical effectiveness of feverfew in the prevention of migraine has not been established beyond reasonable doubt.
Publication
Journal: Human toxicology
February/8/1988
Publication
Journal: The Lancet
August/28/1988
Abstract
The use of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) for migraine prophylaxis was assessed in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. After a one-month single-blind placebo run-in, 72 volunteers were randomly allocated to receive either one capsule of dried feverfew leaves a day or matching placebo for four months and then transferred to the other treatment limb for a further four months. Frequency and severity of attacks were determined from diary cards which were issued every two months; efficacy of each treatment was also assessed by visual analogue scores. 60 patients completed the study and full information was available in 59. Treatment with feverfew was associated with a reduction in the mean number and severity of attacks in each two-month period, and in the degree of vomiting; duration of individual attacks was unaltered. Visual analogue scores also indicated a significant improvement with feverfew. There were no serious side-effects.
Publication
Journal: Medical Science Monitor
November/21/2005
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Treatment of migraine headaches is often delayed due to assessing the potential severity of an evolving headache or anticipating unwanted consequences from prescription medication. Studies have demonstrated improved pain-free response when prescription treatments are taken during the mild headache phase of a migraine. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of an OTC product, GelStat Migraine, when taken in the early, mild pain phase of migraine.
METHODS
An open-label study enrolling 30 subjects, male and female, with a one-year history of migraine meeting IHS diagnostic criteria with or without aura, 2-8 migraines per month and < or = 15 headache days per month. Inclusion required having migraines that consistently started at mild and worsened to moderate or severe, if untreated, in at least 75% of attacks. Subjects also had to be able to distinguish migraine from non-migraine headaches and reliably identify migraine early in the course of an attack. One headache was treated in the mild pain phase with GelStat Migraine, a combination of feverfew and ginger.
RESULTS
29 evaluable subjects completed the study, all treating at mild pain. Two hours after treatment, 48% were pain-free with 34% reporting a headache of only mild severity. 29% reported a recurrence within 24 hours. Side effects were minimal and not serious. 59% of subjects were satisfied with Gelstat Migraine therapy and 41% preferred GelStat Migraine or felt it was equal to their pre-study medication.
CONCLUSIONS
GelStat Migraine is effective as a first line abortive treatment for migraine when initiated early during the mild headache phase.
Publication
Journal: Headache
January/26/2005
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
To determine the efficacy for migraine prophylaxis of a compound containing a combination of riboflavin, magnesium, and feverfew.
BACKGROUND
Previous studies of magnesium and feverfew for migraine prophylaxis have found conflicting results, and there has been only a single placebo-controlled trial of riboflavin.
METHODS
Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of a compound providing a daily dose of riboflavin 400 mg, magnesium 300 mg, and feverfew 100 mg. The placebo contained 25 mg riboflavin. The study included a 1-month run-in phase and 3-month trial. The protocol allowed for 120 patients to be randomized, with a preplanned interim analysis of the data after 48 patients had completed the trial.
RESULTS
Forty-nine patients completed the 3-month trial. For the primary outcome measure, a 50% or greater reduction in migraines, there was no difference between active and "placebo" groups, achieved by 10 (42%) and 11 (44%), respectively (P=.87). Similarly, there was no significant difference in secondary outcome measures, for active versus placebo groups, respectively: 50% or greater reduction in migraine days (33% and 40%, P=.63); or change in mean number of migraines, migraine days, migraine index, or triptan doses. Compared to baseline, however, both groups showed a significant reduction in number of migraines, migraine days, and migraine index. This effect exceeds that reported for placebo agents in previous migraine trials.
CONCLUSIONS
Riboflavin 25 mg showed an effect comparable to a combination of riboflavin 400 mg, magnesium 300 mg, and feverfew 100 mg. The placebo response exceeds that reported for any other placebo in trials of migraine prophylaxis, and suggests that riboflavin 25 mg may be an active comparator. There is at present conflicting scientific evidence with regard to the efficacy of these compounds for migraine prophylaxis.
Publication
Journal: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
September/12/2017
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.), magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are frequently used for migraine prophylaxis. Supplementation with a fixed combination of these three agents (Antemig®, PiLeJe) was investigated in an observational study.
METHODS
Adult patients suffering from migraine according to the criteria of the International Headache Society were enrolled by general practitioners (≥2 migraine attacks during previous month; exclusion of chronic migraine and medication overuse) and after a one-month baseline phase, supplemented with one tablet of 100 mg feverfew, 100 mg coenzyme Q10 and 112.5 mg magnesium per day for 3 months.
RESULTS
Supplementation significantly reduced the number of days with migraine headache during third month of supplementation compared to baseline phase (1.3 days ±1.5 versus 4.9 days ±2.6, p < 0.0001; n = 68 intention to treat; primary criterion). The decrease was progressive over the period of supplementation and significant from first month (1st month: -2.5 days ±3.1, p < 0.0001; 2nd month: -3 days ±2.8, p < 0.0001). The proportion of patients with a reduction of at least 50% in the number of days with migraine headache was 75% (51/68) after 3 months, with a progressive increase over the period of supplementation (63.2% [43/68] after 1 month and 70.6% [48/68] after 2 months). The proportion of patients with anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) decreased between baseline phase and third month of supplementation from 61.9% (39/63 patients with information available) to 35% (21/60) for depression and from 52.4% (33/63) to 30% (18/60) for anxiety. An improvement of quality of life (Qualité de Vie et Migraine questionnaire) was also observed. The combination was well tolerated.
CONCLUSIONS
Results suggest that the proprietary supplement containing feverfew, coenzyme Q10 and magnesium assessed could be beneficial and safe for the prevention of migraine in adult patients and merits further study.
BACKGROUND
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02901756 , retrospectively registered on August 24, 2016.
Publication
Journal: Phytomedicine
December/2/2012
Abstract
The efficacy of feverfew capsules on migraine prophylaxis was investigated in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in which 50 patients, who had not used feverfew before, participated. The capsules were filled with a dried alcoholic extract of feverfew on microcristalline cellulose and contained 0.5 mg parthenolide. The patients used one capsule (feverfew or placebo) a day. Fourty four patients completed the 9 month study. Both treatment groups suffered the same number of migraine attacks. A prophylactic effect could not be demonstrated for our feverfew preparation, but the patients seemed to have a tendency to use fever symptomatic drugs during the period they used feverfew. This result was not in accordance with the results from two other studies. The difference may be explained by the fact that both other studies included patients who previously reported positive experiences with feverfew preparations for migraine prophylaxis.
Publication
Journal: Headache
November/22/2011
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Therapeutic needs of migraineurs vary considerably from patient to patient and even attack to attack. Some attacks require high-end therapy, while other attacks have treatment needs that are less immediate. While triptans are considered the "gold standard" of migraine therapy, they do have limitations and many patients are seeking other therapeutic alternatives. In 2005, an open-label study of feverfew/ginger suggested efficacy for attacks of migraine treated early during the mild headache phase of the attack.
METHODS
In this multi-center pilot study, 60 patients treated 221 attacks of migraine with sublingual feverfew/ginger or placebo. All subjects met International Headache Society criteria for migraine with or without aura, experiencing 2-6 attacks of migraine per month within the previous 3 months. Subjects had <15 headache days per month and were not experiencing medication overuse headache. Inclusion required that subjects were able to identify a period of mild headache in at least 75% of attacks. Subjects were required to be able to distinguish migraine from non-migraine headache. Subjects were randomized 3:1 to receive either sublingual feverfew/ginger or a matching placebo and were instructed but not required to treat with study medication at the earliest recognition of migraine.
RESULTS
Sixty subjects treated 208 evaluable attacks of migraine over a 1-month period; 45 subjects treated 163 attacks with sublingual feverfew/ginger and 15 subjects treated 58 attacks with a sublingual placebo preparation. Evaluable diaries were completed for 151 attacks of migraine in the population using feverfew/ginger and 57 attacks for those attacks treated with placebo. At 2 hours, 32% of subjects receiving active medication and 16% of subjects receiving placebo were pain-free (P= .02). At 2 hours, 63% of subjects receiving feverfew/ginger found pain relief (pain-free or mild headache) vs 39% for placebo (P= .002). Pain level differences on a 4-point pain scale for those receiving feverfew/ginger vs placebo were -0.24 vs -0.04 respectively (P= .006). Feverfew/ginger was generally well tolerated with oral numbness and nausea being the most frequently occurring adverse event.
CONCLUSIONS
Sublingual feverfew/ginger appears safe and effective as a first-line abortive treatment for a population of migraineurs who frequently experience mild headache prior to the onset of moderate to severe headache.
Publication
Journal: J Med Cases
August/25/2021
Abstract
Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew) is a member of the daisy family; it is used to prevent and treat migraine and rheumatoid arthritis. It has a long history of use as a traditional and folk medicine in Chinese, Greek, Indian and Arabic medicine, having been used for hundreds of years. The term feverfew comes from the Latin word febrifugia and means fever reducer. However, Short term use of feverfew (up to 4 months) is considered safe in adults. According to a few clinical trials, Tanacetum parthenium was not associated with serious adverse events but rather with mild and reversible events. Adverse events leading to withdrawals were mainly of a gastrointestinal nature. There is no major safety issue. Nevertheless, we report one case of a 36-year-old woman with known migraine who visited the obstetrics and gynecology clinic upon developing vaginal bleeding, prolonged duration of the menstrual cycle, and reddish skin without bruising. The patient suffered from these symptoms over a period of 3 months prior to the clinic visit. Based on history, the patient began taking 800 mg capsules of feverfew three times per day 9 months ago. We applied the Naranjo scale in our case, and it indicated that a probable relationship exists between feverfew and vaginal bleeding. Feverfew should be used cautiously by patients planning elective surgery, having coagulant disorders or taking antithrombotic drugs.
Keywords: Feverfew; Migraine; Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale; Tanacetum parthenium; Vaginal bleeding.
Publication
Journal: Cephalalgia
December/19/2005
Abstract
The efficacy and tolerability of a CO(2)-extract of feverfew (MIG-99, 6.25 mg t.i.d.) for migraine prevention were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, parallel-group study. Patients (N = 170 intention-to-treat; MIG-99, N = 89; placebo, N = 81) suffering from migraine according to International Headache Society criteria were treated for 16 weeks after a 4-week baseline period. The primary endpoint was the average number of migraine attacks per 28 days during the treatment months 2 and 3 compared with baseline. Safety parameters included adverse events, laboratory parameters, vital signs and physical examination. The migraine frequency decreased from 4.76 by 1.9 attacks per month in the MIG-99 group and by 1.3 attacks in the placebo group (P = 0.0456). Logistic regression of responder rates showed an odds ratio of 3.4 in favour of MIG-99 (P = 0.0049). Adverse events possibly related to study medication were 9/107 (8.4%) with MIG-99 and 11/108 (10.2%) with placebo (P = 0.654). MIG-99 is effective and shows a favourable benefit-risk ratio.
load more...