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Publication
Journal: American journal of human genetics
February/4/2009
Abstract
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal scarring lung disease that affects older adults. Heterozygous rare mutations in the genes encoding telomerase are found in approximately 15% of familial cases. We have used linkage to map another disease-causing gene in a large family with IPF and adenocarcinoma of the lung to a 15.7 Mb region on chromosome 10. We identified a rare missense mutation in a candidate gene, SFTPA2, within the interval encoding surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2). Another rare mutation in SFTPA2 was identified in another family with IPF and lung cancer. Both mutations involve invariant residues in the highly conserved carbohydrate-recognition domain of the protein and are predicted to disrupt protein structure. Recombinant proteins carrying these mutations are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and are not secreted. These data are consistent with SFTPA2 germline mutations that interfere with protein trafficking and cause familial IPF and lung cancer.
Publication
Journal: The Journal of biological chemistry
August/5/2010
Abstract
Rare heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2, SFTPA2) are associated with adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis and adenocarcinoma of the lung. We have previously shown that two recombinant SP-A2 mutant proteins (G231V and F198S) remain within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of A549 cells and are not secreted into the culture medium. The pathogenic mechanism of the mutant proteins is unknown. Here we analyze all common and rare variants of the surfactant protein A2, SP-A2, in both A549 cells and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells. We show that, in contrast with all other SP-A2 variants, the mutant proteins are not secreted into the medium with wild-type SP-A isoforms, form fewer intracellular dimer and trimer oligomers, are partially insoluble in 0.5% Nonidet P-40 lysates of transfected A549 cells, and demonstrate greater protein instability in chymotrypsin proteolytic digestions. Both the G231V and F198S mutant SP-A2 proteins are destroyed via the ER-association degradation pathway. Expression of the mutant proteins increases the transcription of a BiP-reporter construct, expression of BiP protein, and production of an ER stress-induced XBP-1 spliced product. Human bronchoalveolar wash samples from individuals who are heterozygous for the G231V mutation have similar levels of total SP-A as normal family members, which suggests that the mechanism of disease does not involve an overt lack of secreted SP-A but instead involves an increase in ER stress of resident type II alveolar epithelial cells.
Publication
Journal: Disease models & mechanisms
June/5/2013
Abstract
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and often fatal lung disease for which there is no known treatment. Although the traditional paradigm of IPF pathogenesis emphasized chronic inflammation as the primary driver of fibrotic remodeling, more recent insights have challenged this view. Linkage analysis and candidate gene approaches have identified four genes that cause the inherited form of IPF, familial interstitial pneumonia (FIP). These four genes encode two surfactant proteins, surfactant protein C (encoded by SFTPC) and surfactant protein A2 (SFTPA2), and two components of the telomerase complex, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the RNA component of telomerase (TERC). In this review, we discuss how investigating these mutations, as well as genetic variants identified in other inherited disorders associated with pulmonary fibrosis, are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of common idiopathic interstitial lung diseases, particularly IPF. Studies in this area have highlighted key roles for epithelial cell injury and dysfunction in the development of lung fibrosis. In addition, genetic approaches have uncovered the importance of several processes - including endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response, DNA-damage and -repair pathways, and cellular senescence - that might provide new therapeutic targets in fibrotic lung diseases.