Cocaine addiction
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Pubmeds
(13)
Pubmed
Journal: Nature neuroscience
January/24/2006
Abstract

Drugs of abuse have very different acute mechanisms of action but converge on the brain's reward pathways by producing a series of common functional effects after both acute and chronic administration. Some similar actions occur for natural rewards as well. Researchers are making progress in understanding the molecular and cellular basis of these common effects. A major goal for future research is to determine whether such common underpinnings of addiction can be exploited for the development of more effective treatments for a wide range of addictive disorders.

Pubmed
Journal: Nature neuroscience
December/23/2003
Abstract

DeltaFosB (a truncated form of FosB) and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) are transcription factors induced in the brain's reward pathways after chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. However, their mechanisms of action and the genes they regulate remain unclear. Using microarray analysis in the nucleus accumbens of inducible transgenic mice, we found that CREB and a dominant-negative CREB have opposite effects on gene expression, as do prolonged expression of DeltaFosB and the activator protein-1 (AP-1) antagonist DeltacJun. However, unlike CREB, short-term and prolonged DeltaFosB induction had opposing effects on gene expression. Gene expression induced by short-term DeltaFosB and by CREB was strikingly similar, and both reduced the rewarding effects of cocaine, whereas prolonged DeltaFosB expression increased drug reward. Gene expression after a short cocaine treatment was more dependent on CREB, whereas gene expression after a longer cocaine treatment became increasingly DeltaFosB dependent. These findings help define the molecular functions of CREB and DeltaFosB and identify clusters of genes that contribute to cocaine addiction.

Pubmed
Journal: Nature
April/11/2001
Abstract

Cocaine enhances dopamine-mediated neurotransmission by blocking dopamine re-uptake at axon terminals. Most dopamine-containing nerve terminals innervate medium spiny neurons in the striatum of the brain. Cocaine addiction is thought to stem, in part, from neural adaptations that act to maintain equilibrium by countering the effects of repeated drug administration. Chronic exposure to cocaine upregulates several transcription factors that alter gene expression and which could mediate such compensatory neural and behavioural changes. One such transcription factor is DeltaFosB, a protein that persists in striatum long after the end of cocaine exposure. Here we identify cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) as a downstream target gene of DeltaFosB by use of DNA array analysis of striatal material from inducible transgenic mice. Overexpression of DeltaFosB, or chronic cocaine administration, raised levels of Cdk5 messenger RNA, protein, and activity in the striatum. Moreover, injection of Cdk5 inhibitors into the striatum potentiated behavioural effects of repeated cocaine administration. Our results suggest that changes in Cdk5 levels mediated by DeltaFosB, and resulting alterations in signalling involving D1 dopamine receptors, contribute to adaptive changes in the brain related to cocaine addiction.

Pubmed
Journal: Brain research. Molecular brain research
January/30/2005
Abstract

DeltaFosB is a unique transcription factor that plays an essential role in long-term adaptive changes in the brain associated with diverse conditions, such as drug addiction, Parkinson's disease, depression, and antidepressant treatment. It is induced in brain, in a region- and cell-type-specific manner by many types of chronic perturbations. Once induced, it persists for long periods of time due to its unusual stability. The transcriptional effects of DeltaFosB are complex, because the protein can function as both a transcriptional activator and repressor. Progress has been made in identifying specific target genes for DeltaFosB and in relating some of these genes to DeltaFosB's cellular and behavioral actions. Future studies will help us to better understand the biochemical basis of DeltaFosB's unique stability, as well as the precise molecular pathways through which this transcription factor produces its complex effects on neuronal plasticity and complex behavior.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
May/31/1999
Abstract

The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system has been implicated in drug reward, locomotor sensitization, and responding for reward-related stimuli [termed conditioned reinforcers (CR)]. Here, we investigated the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which enhances the survival and function of dopaminergic neurons, on stimulant-induced locomotor sensitization and responding for CR. In experiment 1, BDNF was infused into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) or ventral tegmental area over 2 weeks via chronically implanted minipumps (1-2.5 microgram/d), and the psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine (5-15 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied. We found that BDNF enhanced the initial stimulant effects of cocaine and seemed to facilitate the development of sensitization to repeated cocaine doses. In experiment 2, we studied the effects of intra-NAc BDNF infusions on responding for CR. BDNF-treated rats showed twice as many CR responses compared with controls when saline was first administered. BDNF enhanced responding on the CR lever more than four times that seen in control animals after a cocaine injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.). The enhanced response to cocaine in BDNF-treated animals persisted for more than a month after the BDNF infusions had stopped, indicating long-lasting changes in the mesolimbic DA system caused by BDNF administration. In experiment 3, we examined locomotor sensitization to cocaine in heterozygous BDNF knock-out mice and found that the development of sensitization was delayed compared with wild-type littermates. These results demonstrate the profound effects of BDNF on the enhancement of both cocaine-induced locomotion and facilitation of CR and suggest a possible role for BDNF in long-term adaptations of the brain to cocaine.

Pubmed
Journal: Annual review of medicine
May/24/2004
Abstract

Addiction can be viewed as a form of drug-induced neural plasticity. One of the best-established molecular mechanisms of addiction is upregulation of the cAMP second messenger pathway, which occurs in many neuronal cell types in response to chronic administration of opiates or other drugs of abuse. This upregulation and the resulting activation of the transcription factor CREB appear to mediate aspects of tolerance and dependence. In contrast, induction of another transcription factor, termed DeltaFosB, exerts the opposite effect and may contribute to sensitized responses to drug exposure. Knowledge of these mechanisms could lead to more effective treatments for addictive disorders.

Pubmed
Journal: Neuron
June/14/2004
Abstract

Chronic cocaine administration reduces G protein signaling efficacy. Here, we report that the expression of AGS3, which binds to GialphaGDP and inhibits GDP dissociation, was upregulated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during late withdrawal from repeated cocaine administration. Increased AGS3 was mimicked in the PFC of drug-naive rats by microinjecting a peptide containing the Gialpha binding domain (GPR) of AGS3 fused to the cell permeability domain of HIV-Tat. Infusion of Tat-GPR mimicked the phenotype of chronic cocaine-treated rats by manifesting sensitized locomotor behavior and drug seeking and by increasing glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens. By preventing cocaine withdrawal-induced AGS3 expression with antisense oligonucleotides, signaling through Gialpha was normalized, and both cocaine-induced relapse to drug seeking and locomotor sensitization were prevented. When antisense oligonucleotide infusion was discontinued, drug seeking and sensitization were restored. It is proposed that AGS3 gates the expression of cocaine-induced plasticity by regulating G protein signaling in the PFC.

Pubmed
Journal: Neuron
August/14/2003
Abstract

Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) modulate heterotrimeric G proteins in part by serving as GTPase-activating proteins for Galpha subunits. We examined a role for RGS9-2, an RGS subtype highly enriched in striatum, in modulating dopamine D2 receptor function. Viral-mediated overexpression of RGS9-2 in rat nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum) reduced locomotor responses to cocaine (an indirect dopamine agonist) and to D2 but not to D1 receptor agonists. Conversely, RGS9 knockout mice showed heightened locomotor and rewarding responses to cocaine and related psychostimulants. In vitro expression of RGS9-2 in Xenopus oocytes accelerated the off-kinetics of D2 receptor-induced GIRK currents, consistent with the in vivo data. Finally, chronic cocaine exposure increased RGS9-2 levels in nucleus accumbens. Together, these data demonstrate a functional interaction between RGS9-2 and D2 receptor signaling and the behavioral actions of psychostimulants and suggest that psychostimulant induction of RGS9-2 represents a compensatory adaptation that diminishes drug responsiveness.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of neurochemistry
October/24/2001
Abstract

DeltaFosB is a Fos family transcription factor that is induced by chronic exposure to cocaine and other drugs of abuse in the nucleus accumbens and related striatal regions, brain regions that are important for the behavioral effects of these drugs. To better understand the mechanisms by which DeltaFosB contributes to the effects of chronic drug treatment, we used DNA microarray analysis to identify genes that are regulated in the nucleus accumbens upon DeltaFosB expression in inducible bitransgenic mice. One of the most highly regulated genes was that encoding a subunit of another transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Subsequent experiments confirmed the induction of NF-kappaB in the nucleus accumbens of mice overexpressing DeltaFosB as well as in wild-type mice treated chronically, but not acutely, with cocaine. These results establish NF-kappaB as a putative target for DeltaFosB and implicate NF-kappaB signaling pathways in the long-term adaptations of nucleus accumbens neurons to cocaine.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of neurochemistry
June/25/2002
Abstract

Dopaminergic transmission has been suggested to be a primary mechanism mediating reinforcement, withdrawal and craving associated with psychostimulant addiction. Pyscho-stimulants attenuate dopamine transporter (DAT) clearance efficiency, resulting in a net increase in synaptic dopamine levels. Re-uptake rate is determined by the number of functional DAT molecules at the membrane surface. Previous in vivo imaging studies in humans and in vitro studies in post-mortem human brain have demonstrated that chronic cocaine abuse results in a neuroadaptive increase in DAT-binding site density in the limbic striatum. Whether this increase in DAT availability represents an increase in the functional activity of the transporter is unknown. Here, we present evidence that DAT function is elevated by chronic cocaine abuse. The effect of increasing post-mortem interval on the functional viability of synaptosomes was modeled in the baboon brain. Baboon brains sampled under conditions similar to human brain autopsies yielded synaptosomal preparations that were viable up to 24 h post-mortem. Dopamine (DA) uptake was elevated twofold in the ventral striatum from cocaine users as compared to age-matched drug-free control subjects. The levels of [3H]DA uptake were not elevated in victims of excited cocaine delirium, who experienced paranoia and marked agitation prior to death. In keeping with the increase in DAT function, [3H]WIN 35,428 binding was increased in the cocaine users, but not in the victims of excited delirium. These results demonstrate that DA uptake function assayed in cryopreserved human brain synaptosomes is a suitable approach for testing hypotheses of the mechanisms underlying human brain disorders and for studying the actions of addictive drugs in man.

Pubmed
Journal: Science's STKE : signal transduction knowledge environment
April/20/2006
Abstract

Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by compulsive drug use despite the severe negative consequences associated with it. Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse results in molecular adaptations in neuronal signaling pathways, which eventually manifest in the complex behavioral alterations that characterize addiction. These include tolerance, sensitization, dependence, drug craving, and relapse. In this Review, we focus on recent studies highlighting signaling cascades initiated by cocaine, as a representative of a drug of abuse with a defined site of action, and alcohol, as a drug with an undefined primary site of action. Specifically, we describe recent studies that emphasize the role of protein-protein interactions, phosphorylation, and compartmentalization in the molecular mechanisms that result in the cellular and behavioral adaptations that underlie addiction. Signaling cascades that contribute to addiction, as well as those that protect or delay the development of addiction, are presented.

Pubmed
Journal: Brain research reviews
September/10/2008
Abstract

Substance abuse and addiction are the most costly of all the neuropsychiatric disorders. In the last decades, much progress has been achieved in understanding the effects of the drugs of abuse in the brain. However, efficient treatments that prevent relapse have not been developed. Drug addiction is now considered a brain disease, because the abuse of drugs affects several brain functions. Neurological impairments observed in drug addicts may reflect drug-induced neuronal dysfunction and neurotoxicity. The drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neurotransmitter systems, particularly dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurons. This review explores the literature reporting cellular and molecular alterations reflecting the cytotoxicity induced by amphetamines, cocaine and opiates in neuronal systems. The neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse are often associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inhibition of neurogenesis, among other mechanisms. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie brain dysfunction observed in drug-addicted individuals may contribute to improve the treatment of drug addiction, which may have social and economic consequences.

Pubmed
Journal: Chang Gung medical journal
July/14/2009
Abstract

Drug addiction represents a pathological form of neuroplasticity along with the emergence of aberrant behaviors involving a cascade of neurochemical changes mainly in the brain's rewarding circuitry. The aberrant behavioral phenotypes can be assessed by an animal model of drug-induced behavioral sensitization, which is characterized by an initiation stage that is formed in the ventral tegmental area and a behavioral expression stage determined mainly in the nucleus accumbens. Numerous studies during past decades demonstrate that the mesocorticolimbic dopamine pathway plays an essential role in the development of behavioral sensitization. Moreover, a series of cellular signaling pathways and gene expression determine the severity of addictive behaviors. In addition to the well-characterized dopamine D1 receptor-mediated cAMP/protein kinase A up-regulation in the nucleus accumbens, recent reports indicate the cellular mediator dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) and transcription regulator DeltaFosB are associated with the accumbal PKA pathway to modulate the development of behavioral sensitization. The finding of cAMP-independent and dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/GSK3 in activation in the nucleus accumbens of behaviorally sensitized animals implies that a signal cascade down-stream of both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors comprises the mainstay of the addiction network. This review outlines the cellular pathways that have been demonstrated to participate in psychostimulant addiction, focused particularly in the nucleus accumbens.