Radiation Therapy and Bortezomib and Cetuximab With or Without Cisplatin to Treat Head and Neck Cancer
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Pubmed
Journal: CA: a cancer journal for clinicians
March/14/2007
Abstract

Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates the number of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival based on incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. This report considers incidence data through 2003 and mortality data through 2004. Incidence and death rates are age-standardized to the 2000 US standard million population. A total of 1,444,920 new cancer cases and 559,650 deaths for cancers are projected to occur in the United States in 2007. Notable trends in cancer incidence and mortality rates include stabilization of the age-standardized, delay-adjusted incidence rates for all cancers combined in men from 1995 through 2003; a continuing increase in the incidence rate by 0.3% per year in women; and a 13.6% total decrease in age-standardized cancer death rates among men and women combined between 1991 and 2004. This report also examines cancer incidence, mortality, and survival by site, sex, race/ethnicity, geographic area, and calendar year, as well as the proportionate contribution of selected sites to the overall trends. While the absolute number of cancer deaths decreased for the second consecutive year in the United States (by more than 3,000 from 2003 to 2004) and much progress has been made in reducing mortality rates and improving survival, cancer still accounts for more deaths than heart disease in persons under age 85 years. Further progress can be accelerated by supporting new discoveries and by applying existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population.

Pubmed
Journal: The New England journal of medicine
October/2/1990
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with head-and-neck cancers who are free of disease after local therapy remain at high risk for both recurrent and second primary tumors. Retinoids have proved efficacious in the treatment of premalignant oral lesions and are promising agents for the prevention of epithelial carcinogenesis.

METHODS

We prospectively studied 103 patients who were disease-free after primary treatment for squamous-cell cancers of the larynx, pharynx, or oral cavity. After completion of surgery or radiotherapy (or both), these patients were randomly assigned to receive either isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid) (50 to 100 mg per square meter of body-surface area per day) or placebo, to be taken daily for 12 months.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences between the two groups in the number of local, regional, or distant recurrences of the primary cancers. However, the isotretinoin group had significantly fewer second primary tumors. After a median follow-up of 32 months, only 2 patients (4 percent) in the isotretinoin group had second primary tumors, as compared with 12 (24 percent) in the placebo group (P = 0.005). Multiple second primary tumors occurred in four patients, all of whom were in the placebo group. Of the 14 second cancers, 13 (93 percent) occurred in the head and neck, esophagus, or lung.

CONCLUSIONS

Daily treatment with high doses of isotretinoin is effective in preventing second primary tumors in patients who have been treated for squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck, although it does not prevent recurrences of the original tumor.

Pubmed
Journal: American journal of surgery
November/11/1987
Abstract

This retrospective study on 832 head and neck cancer patients who died between 1961 and 1985 was carried out to determine the incidence and sites of distant metastases. All patients were staged prior to definitive treatment and were autopsied. The overall incidence of distant metastases was 47 percent. The hypopharynx had the highest incidence of distant metastases (60 percent), followed by the base of the tongue (53 percent) and the anterior tongue (50 percent). Of the 387 patients with distant metastases, 91 percent died with uncontrolled tumor either at the primary site or in the neck. The lung was the most common site of distant metastases (80 percent), followed by the mediastinal nodes (34 percent), the liver (31 percent), and bone (31 percent). Overall, 6 percent of the patients had stage I disease, 20 percent had stage II disease, 32 percent had stage III disease, and 43 percent had stage IV disease. The highest incidence of distant metastases was found in those patients with stage IV disease (193 of 350 patients, 55 percent). We believe that the initial stage of disease does appear to be related to the ultimate development of the distant metastases.