nfkb1 - nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide enhancer in B-cells
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Publication
Journal: Cell
March/5/2008
Abstract
The transcription factor NF-kappaB has served as a standard for inducible transcription factors for more than 20 years. The numerous stimuli that activate NF-kappaB, and the large number of genes regulated by NF-kappaB, ensure that this transcription factor is still the subject of intense research. Here, we attempt to synthesize some of the basic principles that have emerged from studies of NF-kappaB, and we aim to generate a more unified view of NF-kappaB regulation.
Publication
Journal: Annual Review of Immunology
December/23/1996
Abstract
The transcription factor NF-kappa B has attracted widespread attention among researchers in many fields based on the following: its unusual and rapid regulation, the wide range of genes that it controls, its central role in immunological processes, the complexity of its subunits, and its apparent involvement in several diseases. A primary level of control for NF-kappa B is through interactions with an inhibitor protein called I kappa B. Recent evidence confirms the existence of multiple forms of I kappa B that appear to regulate NF-kappa B by distinct mechanisms. NF-kappa B can be activated by exposure of cells to LPS or inflammatory cytokines such as TNF or IL-1, viral infection or expression of certain viral gene products, UV irradiation, B or T cell activation, and by other physiological and nonphysiological stimuli. Activation of NF-kappa B to move into the nucleus is controlled by the targeted phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I kappa B. Exciting new research has elaborated several important and unexpected findings that explain mechanisms involved in the activation of NF-kappa B. In the nucleus, NF-kappa B dimers bind to target DNA elements and activate transcription of genes encoding proteins involved with immune or inflammation responses and with cell growth control. Recent data provide evidence that NF-kappa B is constitutively active in several cell types, potentially playing unexpected roles in regulation of gene expression. In addition to advances in describing the mechanisms of NF-kappa B activation, excitement in NF-kappa B research has been generated by the first report of a crystal structure for one form of NF-kappa B, the first gene knockout studies for different forms of NF-kB and of I kappa B, and the implications for therapies of diseases thought to involve the inappropriate activation of NF-kappa B.
Publication
Journal: Annual Review of Immunology
August/4/1998
Abstract
The transcription factor NF-kappa B, more than a decade after its discovery, remains an exciting and active area of study. The involvement of NF-kappa B in the expression of numerous cytokines and adhesion molecules has supported its role as an evolutionarily conserved coordinating element in the organism's response to situations of infection, stress, and injury. Recently, significant advances have been made in elucidating the details of the pathways through which signals are transmitted to the NF-kappa B:I kappa B complex in the cytosol. The field now awaits the discovery and characterization of the kinase responsible for the inducible phosphorylation of I kappa B proteins. Another exciting development has been the demonstration that in certain situations NF-kappa B acts as an anti-apoptotic protein; therefore, elucidation of the mechanism by which NF-kappa B protects against cell death is an important goal. Finally, the generation of knockouts of members of the NF-kappa B/I kappa B family has allowed the study of the roles of these proteins in normal development and physiology. In this review, we discuss some of these recent findings and their implications for the study of NF-kappa B.
Publication
Journal: Nature
December/25/2012
Abstract
Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate phenotypes have implicated previously unsuspected mechanisms, such as autophagy, in their pathogenesis and showed that some IBD loci are shared with other inflammatory diseases. Here we expand on the knowledge of relevant pathways by undertaking a meta-analysis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis genome-wide association scans, followed by extensive validation of significant findings, with a combined total of more than 75,000 cases and controls. We identify 71 new associations, for a total of 163 IBD loci, that meet genome-wide significance thresholds. Most loci contribute to both phenotypes, and both directional (consistently favouring one allele over the course of human history) and balancing (favouring the retention of both alleles within populations) selection effects are evident. Many IBD loci are also implicated in other immune-mediated disorders, most notably with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis. We also observe considerable overlap between susceptibility loci for IBD and mycobacterial infection. Gene co-expression network analysis emphasizes this relationship, with pathways shared between host responses to mycobacteria and those predisposing to IBD.
Publication
Journal: Cell
November/7/2005
Abstract
Viral infection triggers host innate immune responses through activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and IRF 3, which coordinately regulate the expression of type-I interferons such as interferon-beta (IFN-beta). Herein, we report the identification of a novel protein termed MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), which mediates the activation of NF-kappaB and IRF 3 in response to viral infection. Silencing of MAVS expression through RNA interference abolishes the activation of NF-kappaB and IRF 3 by viruses, thereby permitting viral replication. Conversely, overexpression of MAVS induces the expression of IFN-beta through activation of NF-kappaB and IRF 3, thus boosting antiviral immunity. Epistasis experiments show that MAVS is required for the phosphorylation of IRF 3 and IkappaB and functions downstream of RIG-I, an intracellular receptor for viral RNA. MAVS contains an N-terminal CARD-like domain and a C-terminal transmembrane domain, both of which are essential for MAVS signaling. The transmembrane domain targets MAVS to the mitochondria, implicating a new role of mitochondria in innate immunity.
Publication
Journal: Nature
September/15/2011
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals, and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk. Modestly powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects have a key role in disease susceptibility. Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9,772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the HLA-DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly overrepresented among those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T-helper-cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.
Publication
Journal: Journal of Clinical Investigation
February/1/2001
Publication
Journal: Cell
November/24/1996
Publication
Journal: Science
December/9/1996
Abstract
Studies on mice deficient in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) subunits have shown that this transcription factor is important for lymphocyte responses to antigens and cytokine-inducible gene expression. In particular, the RelA (p65) subunit is required for induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent genes. Treatment of RelA-deficient (RelA-/-) mouse fibroblasts and macrophages with TNF-alpha resulted in a significant reduction in viability, whereas RelA+/+ cells were unaffected. Cytotoxicity to both cell types was mediated by TNF receptor 1. Reintroduction of RelA into RelA-/- fibroblasts resulted in enhanced survival, demonstrating that the presence of RelA is required for protection from TNF-alpha. These results have implications for the treatment of inflammatory and proliferative diseases.
Publication
Journal: Science
November/22/1988
Abstract
In cells that do not express immunoglobulin kappa light chain genes, the kappa enhancer binding protein NF-kappa B is found in cytosolic fractions and exhibits DNA binding activity only in the presence of a dissociating agent such as sodium deoxycholate. The dependence on deoxycholate is shown to result from association of NF-kappa B with a 60- to 70-kilodalton inhibitory protein (I kappa B). The fractionated inhibitor can inactivate NF-kappa B from various sources--including the nuclei of phorbol ester-treated cells--in a specific, saturable, and reversible manner. The cytoplasmic localization of the complex of NF-kappa B and I kappa B was supported by enucleation experiments. An active phorbol ester must therefore, presumably by activation of protein kinase C, cause dissociation of a cytoplasmic complex of NF-kappa B and I kappa B by modifying I kappa B. this releases active NF-kappa B which can translocate into the nucleus to activate target enhancers. The data show the existence of a phorbol ester-responsive regulatory protein that acts by controlling the DNA binding activity and subcellular localization of a transcription factor.
Publication
Journal: Nature Medicine
April/28/2005
Abstract
We show that NF-kappaB and transcriptional targets are activated in liver by obesity and high-fat diet (HFD). We have matched this state of chronic, subacute 'inflammation' by low-level activation of NF-kappaB in the liver of transgenic mice, designated LIKK, by selectively expressing constitutively active IKK-b in hepatocytes. These mice exhibit a type 2 diabetes phenotype, characterized by hyperglycemia, profound hepatic insulin resistance, and moderate systemic insulin resistance, including effects in muscle. The hepatic production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, was increased in LIKK mice to a similar extent as induced by HFD in in wild-type mice. Parallel increases were observed in cytokine signaling in liver and mucscle of LIKK mice. Insulin resistance was improved by systemic neutralization of IL-6 or salicylate inhibition of IKK-beta. Hepatic expression of the IkappaBalpha superrepressor (LISR) reversed the phenotype of both LIKK mice and wild-type mice fed an HFD. These findings indicate that lipid accumulation in the liver leads to subacute hepatic 'inflammation' through NF-kappaB activation and downstream cytokine production. This causes insulin resistance both locally in liver and systemically.
Publication
Journal: Science
December/5/2002
Abstract
Nuclear localization of the transcriptional activator NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is controlled in mammalian cells by three isoforms of NF-kappaB inhibitor protein: IkappaBalpha, -beta, and - epsilon. Based on simplifying reductions of the IkappaB-NF-kappaB signaling module in knockout cell lines, we present a computational model that describes the temporal control of NF-kappaB activation by the coordinated degradation and synthesis of IkappaB proteins. The model demonstrates that IkappaBalpha is responsible for strong negative feedback that allows for a fast turn-off of the NF-kappaB response, whereas IkappaBbeta and - epsilon function to reduce the system's oscillatory potential and stabilize NF-kappaB responses during longer stimulations. Bimodal signal-processing characteristics with respect to stimulus duration are revealed by the model and are shown to generate specificity in gene expression.
Publication
Journal: Cell
December/8/2009
Abstract
Inflammation is linked clinically and epidemiologically to cancer, and NF-kappaB appears to play a causative role, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We show that transient activation of Src oncoprotein can mediate an epigenetic switch from immortalized breast cells to a stably transformed line that forms self-renewing mammospheres that contain cancer stem cells. Src activation triggers an inflammatory response mediated by NF-kappaB that directly activates Lin28 transcription and rapidly reduces let-7 microRNA levels. Let-7 directly inhibits IL6 expression, resulting in higher levels of IL6 than achieved by NF-kappaB activation. IL6-mediated activation of the STAT3 transcription factor is necessary for transformation, and IL6 activates NF-kappaB, thereby completing a positive feedback loop. This regulatory circuit operates in other cancer cells lines, and its transcriptional signature is found in human cancer tissues. Thus, inflammation activates a positive feedback loop that maintains the epigenetic transformed state for many generations in the absence of the inducing signal.
Publication
Journal: Molecular Cell
June/13/2002
Abstract
Networks of protein interactions coordinate cellular functions. We describe a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay for determination of the locations of protein interactions in living cells. This approach is based on complementation between two nonfluorescent fragments of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) when they are brought together by interactions between proteins fused to each fragment. BiFC analysis was used to investigate interactions among bZIP and Rel family transcription factors. Regions outside the bZIP domains determined the locations of bZIP protein interactions. The subcellular sites of protein interactions were regulated by signaling. Cross-family interactions between bZIP and Rel proteins affected their subcellular localization and modulated transcription activation. These results attest to the general applicability of the BiFC assay for studies of protein interactions.
Publication
Journal: Journal of Immunology
September/14/2009
Abstract
The IL-1 family cytokines are regulated on transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Pattern recognition and cytokine receptors control pro-IL-1beta transcription whereas inflammasomes regulate the proteolytic processing of pro-IL-1beta. The NLRP3 inflammasome, however, assembles in response to extracellular ATP, pore-forming toxins, or crystals only in the presence of proinflammatory stimuli. How the activation of gene transcription by signaling receptors enables NLRP3 activation remains elusive and controversial. In this study, we show that cell priming through multiple signaling receptors induces NLRP3 expression, which we identified to be a critical checkpoint for NLRP3 activation. Signals provided by NF-kappaB activators are necessary but not sufficient for NLRP3 activation, and a second stimulus such as ATP or crystal-induced damage is required for NLRP3 activation.
Publication
Journal: Cell
October/18/1994
Abstract
We demonstrate an essential role for the proteasome complex in two proteolytic processes required for activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B. The p105 precursor of the p50 subunit of NF-kappa B is processed in vitro by an ATP-dependent process that requires proteasomes and ubiquitin conjugation. The C-terminal region of p105 is rapidly degraded, leaving the N-terminal p50 domain. p105 processing can be blocked in intact cells with inhibitors of the proteasome or in yeast with proteasome mutants. These inhibitors also block the activation of NF-kappa B and the rapid degradation of I kappa B alpha induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha. Thus, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway functions not only in the complete degradation of polypeptides, but also in the regulated processing of precursors into active proteins.
Publication
Journal: Science
December/9/1996
Abstract
Many cells are resistant to stimuli that can induce apoptosis, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. The activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) by tumor necrosis factor (TNF), ionizing radiation, or daunorubicin (a cancer chemotherapeutic compound), was found to protect from cell killing. Inhibition of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation enhanced apoptotic killing by these reagents but not by apoptotic stimuli that do not activate NF-kappaB. These results provide a mechanism of cellular resistance to killing by some apoptotic reagents, offer insight into a new role for NF-kappaB, and have potential for improvement of the efficacy of cancer therapies.
Publication
Journal: Nature
August/26/1997
Abstract
Nuclear transcription factors of the NF-kappaB/Rel family are inhibited by IkappaB proteins, which inactivate NF-kappaB by trapping it in the cell cytoplasm. Phosphorylation of IkappaBs marks them out for destruction, thereby relieving their inhibitory effect on NF-kappaB. A cytokine-activated protein kinase complex, IKK (for IkappaB kinase), has now been purified that phosphorylates IkappaBs on the sites that trigger their degradation. A component of IKK was molecularly cloned and identified as a serine kinase. IKK turns out to be the long-sought-after protein kinase that mediates the critical regulatory step in NF-kappaB activation.
Publication
Journal: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology
August/16/2010
Abstract
The nuclear factor NF-kappaB pathway has long been considered a prototypical proinflammatory signaling pathway, largely based on the role of NF-kappaB in the expression of proinflammatory genes including cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. In this article, we describe how genetic evidence in mice has revealed complex roles for the NF-kappaB in inflammation that suggest both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles for this pathway. NF-kappaB has long been considered the "holy grail" as a target for new anti-inflammatory drugs; however, these recent studies suggest this pathway may prove a difficult target in the treatment of chronic disease. In this article, we discuss the role of NF-kappaB in inflammation in light of these recent studies.
Publication
Journal: Nature
August/8/1995
Abstract
NF-kappa B, which consists of two polypeptides, p50 (M(r) 50K) and p65/RelA (M(r) 65K), is thought to be a key regulator of genes involved in responses to infection, inflammation and stress. Indeed, although developmentally normal, mice deficient in p50 display functional defects in immune responses. Here we describe the generation of mice deficient in the RelA subunit of NF-kappa B. Disruption of the relA locus leads to embryonic lethality at 15-16 days of gestation, concomitant with a massive degeneration of the liver by programmed cell death or apoptosis. Embryonic fibroblasts from RelA-deficient mice are defective in the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated induction of messenger RNAs for I kappa B alpha and granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), although basal levels of these transcripts are unaltered. These results indicate that RelA controls inducible, but not basal, transcription in NF-kappa B-regulated pathways.
Publication
Journal: Genes and Development
December/27/1995
Publication
Journal: Nature Genetics
February/12/2009
Abstract
Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated disorder that affects the skin, nails and joints. To identify psoriasis susceptibility loci, we genotyped 438,670 SNPs in 1,409 psoriasis cases and 1,436 controls of European ancestry. We followed up 21 promising SNPs in 5,048 psoriasis cases and 5,041 controls. Our results provide strong support for the association of at least seven genetic loci and psoriasis (each with combined P < 5 x 10(-8)). Loci with confirmed association include HLA-C, three genes involved in IL-23 signaling (IL23A, IL23R, IL12B), two genes that act downstream of TNF-alpha and regulate NF-kappaB signaling (TNIP1, TNFAIP3) and two genes involved in the modulation of Th2 immune responses (IL4, IL13). Although the proteins encoded in these loci are known to interact biologically, we found no evidence for epistasis between associated SNPs. Our results expand the catalog of genetic loci implicated in psoriasis susceptibility and suggest priority targets for study in other auto-immune disorders.
Publication
Journal: Science
August/15/1999
Abstract
Apoptosis is implicated in the generation and resolution of inflammation in response to bacterial pathogens. All bacterial pathogens produce lipoproteins (BLPs), which trigger the innate immune response. BLPs were found to induce apoptosis in THP-1 monocytic cells through human Toll-like receptor-2 (hTLR2). BLPs also initiated apoptosis in an epithelial cell line transfected with hTLR2. In addition, BLPs stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB, a transcriptional activator of multiple host defense genes, and activated the respiratory burst through hTLR2. Thus, hTLR2 is a molecular link between microbial products, apoptosis, and host defense mechanisms.
Publication
Journal: Cell
October/29/2008
Abstract
Overnutrition is associated with chronic inflammation in metabolic tissues. Whether metabolic inflammation compromises the neural regulatory systems and therefore promotes overnutrition-associated diseases remains unexplored. Here we show that a mediator of metabolic inflammation, IKKbeta/NF-kappaB, normally remains inactive although enriched in hypothalamic neurons. Overnutrition atypically activates hypothalamic IKKbeta/NF-kappaB at least in part through elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress in the hypothalamus. While forced activation of hypothalamic IKKbeta/NF-kappaB interrupts central insulin/leptin signaling and actions, site- or cell-specific suppression of IKKbeta either broadly across the brain or locally within the mediobasal hypothalamus, or specifically in hypothalamic AGRP neurons significantly protects against obesity and glucose intolerance. The molecular mechanisms involved include regulation by IKKbeta/NF-kappaB of SOCS3, a core inhibitor of insulin and leptin signaling. Our results show that the hypothalamic IKKbeta/NF-kappaB program is a general neural mechanism for energy imbalance underlying obesity and suggest that suppressing hypothalamic IKKbeta/NF-kappaB may represent a strategy to combat obesity and related diseases.
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