bdnf - brain derived neurotrophic factor
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Pubmed
Journal: American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics
January/5/2009
Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex condition with environmental and genetic etiologies. Up to this point, research has identified genetic associations with candidate genes from known biological pathways. In order to identify novel ADHD susceptibility genes, 600,000 SNPs were genotyped in 958 ADHD proband-parent trios. After applying data cleaning procedures we examined 429,981 autosomal SNPs in 909 family trios. We generated six quantitative phenotypes from 18 ADHD symptoms to be used in genome-wide association analyses. With the PBAT screening algorithm, we identified 2 SNPs, rs6565113 and rs552655 that met the criteria for significance within a specified phenotype. These SNPs are located in intronic regions of genes CDH13 and GFOD1, respectively. CDH13 has been implicated previously in substance use disorders. We also evaluated the association of SNPs from a list of 37 ADHD candidate genes that was specified a priori. These findings, along with association P-values with a magnitude less than 10(-5), are discussed in this manuscript. Seventeen of these candidate genes had association P-values lower then 0.01: SLC6A1, SLC9A9, HES1, ADRB2, HTR1E, DDC, ADRA1A, DBH, DRD2, BDNF, TPH2, HTR2A, SLC6A2, PER1, CHRNA4, SNAP25, and COMT. Among the candidate genes, SLC9A9 had the strongest overall associations with 58 association test P-values lower than 0.01 and multiple association P-values at a magnitude of 10(-5) in this gene. In sum, these findings identify novel genetic associations at viable ADHD candidate genes and provide confirmatory evidence for associations at previous candidate genes. Replication of these results is necessary in order to confirm the proposed genetic variants for ADHD.

Pubmed
Journal: Neuron
August/10/1995
Abstract

The physiological role of BDNF and NT-3 in the development of the vestibular and auditory systems was investigated in mice that carry a deleted BDNF and/or NT-3 gene. BDNF was the major survival factor for vestibular ganglion neurons, and NT-3, for spiral ganglion neurons. Lack of BDNF and NT-3 did not affect ingrowth of nerve fibers into the vestibular epithelium, but BDNF mutants failed to maintain afferent and efferent innervation. In the cochlea, BDNF mutants lost type 2 spiral neurons, causing an absence of outer hair cell innervation. NT-3 mutants showed a paucity of afferents and lost 87% of spiral neurons, presumably corresponding to type 1 neurons, which innervate inner hair cells. Double mutants had an additive loss, lacking all vestibular and spiral neurons. These results show that BDNF and NT-3 are crucial for inner ear development and, although largely coexpressed, have distinct and nonoverlapping roles in the vestibular and auditory systems.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
August/9/2000
Abstract

Internalization and transport of a ligand-receptor complex are required to initiate cell body responses to target-derived neurotrophin. However, it is not known whether internalized receptors and cell surface receptors initiate the same signaling pathways and biological responses. Here we use a temperature-sensitive mutant of dynamin (G273D) to control the subcellular localization of activated NGF receptors (Trks). We show that dynamin function is required for ligand-dependent endocytosis of Trk receptors. In PC12 cells, nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulation promotes both survival and neuronal differentiation. These distinct biological responses to NGF are controlled by receptors signaling from different locations within the cell. Neuronal differentiation is promoted by catalytically active Trks within endosomes in the cell interior. In contrast, survival responses are initiated by activated receptors at the cell surface where they orchestrate prolonged activation of the kinase Akt. Thus, interactions between Trk receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular signaling molecules are dictated both by phosphotyrosine motifs within the receptors and by the intracellular location of phosphorylated receptors.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
August/30/2000
Abstract

Interactions between FGF10 and the IIIb isoform of FGFR-2 appear to be crucial for the induction and growth of several organs, particularly those that involve budding morphogenesis. We determined their expression patterns in the inner ear and analyzed the inner ear phenotype of mice specifically deleted for the IIIb isoform of FGFR-2. FGF10 and FGFR-2(IIIb) mRNAs showed distinct, largely nonoverlapping expression patterns in the undifferentiated otic epithelium. Subsequently, FGF10 mRNA became confined to the presumptive cochlear and vestibular sensory epithelia and to the neuronal precursors and neurons. FGFR-2(IIIb) mRNA was expressed in the nonsensory epithelium of the otocyst that gives rise to structures such as the endolymphatic and semicircular ducts. These data suggest that in contrast to mesenchymal-epithelial-based FGF10 signaling demonstrated for other organs, the inner ear seems to depend on paracrine signals that operate within the epithelium. Expression of FGF10 mRNA partly overlapped with FGF3 mRNA in the sensory regions, suggesting that they may form parallel signaling pathways within the otic epithelium. In addition, hindbrain-derived FGF3 might regulate otocyst morphogenesis through FGFR-2(IIIb). Targeted deletion of FGFR-2(IIIb) resulted in severe dysgenesis of the cochleovestibular membraneous labyrinth, caused by a failure in morphogenesis at the otocyst stage. In addition to the nonsensory epithelium, sensory patches and the cochleovestibular ganglion remained at a rudimentary stage. Our findings provide genetic evidence that signaling by FGFR-2(IIIb) is critical for the morphological development of the inner ear.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
March/18/2007
Abstract

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been reported to play a critical role in modulating plasticity in developing sensory cortices. In the visual cortex, maturation of neuronal circuits involving GABAergic neurons has been shown to trigger a critical period. To date, several classes of GABAergic neurons are known, each of which are thought to play distinct functions. Of these, parvalbumin (PV)-containing, fast-spiking (FS) cells are suggested to be involved in the initiation of the critical period. Here, we report that BDNF plays an essential role in the normal development of PV-FS cells during a plastic period in the barrel cortex. We found that characteristic electrophysiological properties of PV-FS cells, such as low spike adaptation ratio, reduced voltage sags in response to hyperpolarization, started to develop around the second postnatal week and attained adult level in several days. We also found that immunoreactivity against PV was also acquired after the similar developmental time course. Then, using BDNF-/- mice, we found that these electrophysiological as well as chemical properties were underdeveloped or did not appear at all. We conclude BDNF regulates the development of electrophysiological and immunohistochemical characteristics in PV-FS cells. Because BDNF is suggested to regulate the initiation of plasticity, our results strongly indicate that BDNF is involved in the regulation of the critical period by promoting the functional development of PV-FS GABAergic neurons.

Pubmed
Journal: Behavioural pharmacology
October/22/2007
Abstract

It has been shown that music might be able to improve mood state in people affected by psychiatric disorders, ameliorate cognitive deficits in people with dementia and increase motor coordination in Parkinson patients. Robust experimental evidence explaining the central effects of music, however, is missing. This study was designed to investigate the effect of music on brain neurotrophin production and behavior in the mouse. We exposed young adult mice to music with a slow rhythm (6 h/day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 db) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, mice were tested for passive avoidance learning and then killed for analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in selected brain regions. We found that music-exposed mice showed increased BDNF, but not nerve growth factor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we observed that music exposure significantly enhanced learning performance, as measured by the passive avoidance test. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music can modulate the activity of the hippocampus by influencing BDNF production. Our findings also suggest that music exposure might be of help in several central nervous system pathologies.

Pubmed
Journal: Hearing research
September/13/2011
Abstract

Atonal homolog1 (Atoh1, formerly Math1) is a crucial bHLH transcription factor for inner ear hair cell differentiation. Its absence in embryos results in complete absence of mature hair cells at birth and its misexpression can generate extra hair cells. Thus Atoh1 may be both necessary and sufficient for hair cell differentiation in the ear. Atoh1 null mice die at birth and have some undifferentiated cells in sensory epithelia carrying Atoh1 markers. The fate of these undifferentiated cells in neonates is unknown due to lethality. We use Tg(Pax2-Cre) to delete floxed Atoh1 in the inner ear. This generates viable conditional knockout (CKO) mice for studying the postnatal development of the inner ear without differentiated hair cells. Using in situ hybridization we find that Tg(Pax2-Cre) recombines the floxed Atoh1 prior to detectable Atoh1 expression. Only the posterior canal crista has Atoh1 expressing hair cells due to incomplete recombination. Most of the organ of Corti cells are lost in CKO mice via late embryonic cell death. Marker genes indicate that the organ of Corti is reduced to two rows of cells wedged between flanking markers of the organ of Corti (Fgf10 and Bmp4). These two rows of cells (instead of five rows of supporting cells) are positive for Prox1 in neonates. By postnatal day 14 (P14), the remaining cells of the organ of Corti are transformed into a flat epithelium with no distinction of any specific cell type. However, some of the remaining organ of Corti cells express Myo7a at late postnatal stages and are innervated by remaining afferent fibers. Initial growth of afferents and efferents in embryos shows no difference between control mice and Tg(Pax2-Cre)::Atoh1 CKO mice. Most afferents and efferents are lost in the CKO mutant before birth, except for the apex and few fibers in the base. Afferents focus their projections on patches that express the prosensory specifying gene, Sox2. This pattern of innervation by sensory neurons is maintained at least until P14, but fibers target the few Myo7a positive cells found in later stages.

Pubmed
Journal: Neurobiology of aging
August/16/2011
Abstract

The neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is essential for synaptic function, plasticity and neuronal survival. At the axon terminal, when BDNF binds to its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), the signal is propagated along the axon to the cell body, via retrograde transport, regulating gene expression and neuronal function. Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by early impairments in synaptic function that may result in part from neurotrophin signaling deficits. Growing evidence suggests that soluble β-amyloid (Aβ) assemblies cause synaptic dysfunction by disrupting both neurotransmitter and neurotrophin signaling. Utilizing a novel microfluidic culture chamber, we demonstrate a BDNF retrograde signaling deficit in AD transgenic mouse neurons (Tg2576) that can be reversed by γ-secretase inhibitors. Using BDNF-GFP, we show that BDNF-mediated TrkB retrograde trafficking is impaired in Tg2576 axons. Furthermore, Aβ oligomers alone impair BDNF retrograde transport. Thus, Aβ reduces BDNF signaling by impairing axonal transport and this may underlie the synaptic dysfunction observed in AD.

Pubmed
Journal: Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
November/7/1999
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are hypothesized to play an important role in vertebrate eye development because of their patterned expression in the developing and adult neuroretina, their regulated response to retinal and optic nerve injury, and the effects of altered neurotrophin signaling on retinal development. To further characterize the role of these neurotrophins in mammalian eye development and maintenance, the pattern of expression of BDNF and NT-3 was analyzed in the developing and mature mouse eye.

METHODS

Using mouse strains in which the reporter gene lacZ, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase, was targeted to either the BDNF or NT-3 locus, the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in the eyes of mice heterozygous for these mutations was analyzed by enzyme histochemistry during embryogenesis, postnatal development, and adulthood.

RESULTS

BDNF and NT-3 expression were first observed in the inner and outer segments of the developing optic cup at embryonic days 10.5 to 11.5. As the retina matured, BDNF expression was restricted to retinal ganglion cells and a subset of cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL), whereas NT-3 expression was confined to a small subset of cells in the INL and ganglion cell layer. Both neurotrophins were expressed within the developing retinal pigment epithelium. In the anterior segment, BDNF and NT-3 were expressed at high levels in the developing and mature ciliary epithelium. In the lens and cornea, however, these neurotrophins displayed distinct patterns of expression during development and adulthood. BDNF expression was found in the lens epithelium, immature trabecular meshwork, corneal endothelium, and corneal epithelium, whereas NT-3 expression was confined to the corneal epithelium.

CONCLUSIONS

BDNF and NT-3 exhibit different, yet overlapping, patterns of expression during the development and differentiation of the mouse eye. In addition to the neuroretina, the spatiotemporal expression of BDNF and NT-3 may play an important role in the development and maintenance of the lens, ciliary body, trabecular meshwork, and cornea.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of affective disorders
October/31/2011
Abstract

The serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism have both been linked to depression symptoms and to depression diagnosis (MDD) in interaction with adversity; there have also been failures to find the effects. We reexamined both interactions for lifetime MDD in a college sample. Lifetime MDD was diagnosed by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV in 133 undergraduates; genotypes for 5-HTTLPR and BDNF were assayed from blood, and self-reports were collected concerning childhood adversity (Risk). 5-HTTLPR interacted with Risk such that Risk predicted less likelihood of MDD among ll carriers and tended to predict greater likelihood of MDD among s carriers. BDNF interacted with Risk such that Risk predicted greater likelihood of MDD among met carriers and did not influence val/val carriers. These two interactions were additive: both were significant in a combined model.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of neurochemistry
February/18/2015
Abstract

Although the causes of psychiatric disorders are not fully understood, it is well established that mental illness originates from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. In this regard, compelling evidence demonstrates that depression can be the consequence of altered, and often maladaptive, response to adversities during pre- and early post-natal life. In this study, we investigated the impact of chronic maternal separation (MS) on the expression of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout rats in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus as well as the ventromedial and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (PFC). We found that both SERT deletion and the MS led to an overall reduction in Bdnf expression in the ventral hippocampus and the ventromedial PFC, whereas in the dorsal hippocampus and in the dorsomedial PFC, we observed a significant increase in the neurotrophin gene expression after MS exposure, specifically in the heterozygous SERT rats. In summary, we show that the modulation of Bdnf expression in SERT mutant rats exposed to MS reflects the complex functional consequences of this gene-environment interaction with a clear distinction between the ventral and the dorsal subfields of the hippocampus and of the PFC. Early life stress differently affects the expression of Bdnf in an anatomically distinct manner as a function of SERT genotype. Specifically, both SERT deletion and the maternal separation (MS) led to an overall reduction in Bdnf expression in the ventral hippocampus and in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, whereas in the dorsal hippocampus and in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, we observed a significant increase in the neurotrophin gene expression after MS exposure specifically in the heterozygous SERT rats. We think that these findings may provide novel cues for modulating neurotrophin function, which is dys-regulated in several psychiatric conditions.

Pubmed
Journal: The world journal of biological psychiatry : the official journal of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry
February/7/2005
Abstract

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A functional polymorphism Val66Met of BDNF gene was studied in patients with schizophrenia (n=336), bipolar affective disorder (n=352) and healthy controls (n=375). Consensus diagnosis by at least two psychiatrists, according to DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria, was made for each patient using a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID). No association was found between the studied polymorphism and schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder either for genotype or allele distribution (for genotype: p=0.210 in schizophrenia, p=0.400 in bipolar disorder; for alleles: p=0.260 in schizophrenia, p=0.406 in bipolar disorder). Results were also not significant when analysed by gender. For males genotype distribution and allele frequency were (respectively): p=0.480 and p=0.312 in schizophrenia, p=0.819 and p=0.673 in bipolar affective disorder. Genotype distribution and allele frequency observed in the female group were: p=0.258 for genotypes, p=0.482 for alleles in schizophrenia; p=0.432 for genotypes, p=0.464 for alleles in bipolar affective disorder. A subgroup of schizophrenic (n=62) and bipolar affective patients (n=28) with early age at onset (18 years or younger) was analysed (p=0.328 for genotypes, p=0.253 for alleles in schizophrenia; p=0.032 for genotypes, p=0.858 for alleles in bipolar affective disorder).

Pubmed
Journal: Development (Cambridge, England)
December/14/2010
Abstract

During development, many organs, including the kidney, lung and mammary gland, need to branch in a regulated manner to be functional. Multicellular branching involves changes in cell shape, proliferation and migration. Axonal branching, however, is a unicellular process that is mediated by changes in cell shape alone and as such appears very different to multicellular branching. Sprouty (Spry) family members are well-characterised negative regulators of Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling. Knockout of Spry1, 2 and 4 in mouse result in branching defects in different organs, indicating an important role of RTK signalling in controlling branching pattern. We report here that Spry3, a previously uncharacterised member of the Spry family plays a role in axonal branching. We found that spry3 is expressed specifically in the trigeminal nerve and in spinal motor and sensory neurons in a Brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF)-dependent manner. Knockdown of Spry3 expression causes an excess of axonal branching in spinal cord motoneurons in vivo. Furthermore, Spry3 inhibits the ability of BDNF to induce filopodia in Xenopus spinal cord neurons. Biochemically, we show that Spry3 represses calcium release downstream of BDNF signalling. Altogether, we have found that Spry3 plays an important role in the regulation of axonal branching of motoneurons in vivo, raising the possibility of unexpected conservation in the involvement of intracellular regulators of RTK signalling in multicellular and unicellular branching.

Pubmed
Journal: Endocrinology
June/24/2003
Abstract

Dietary restriction (DR) extends life span and improves glucose metabolism in mammals. Recent studies have shown that DR stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain cells, which may mediate neuroprotective and neurogenic actions of DR. Other studies have suggested a role for central BDNF signaling in the regulation of glucose metabolism and body weight. BDNF heterozygous knockout (BDNF+/-) mice are obese and exhibit features of insulin resistance. We now report that an intermittent fasting DR regimen reverses several abnormal phenotypes of BDNF(+/-) mice including obesity, hyperphagia, and increased locomotor activity. DR increases BDNF levels in the brains of BDNF(+/-) mice to the level of wild-type mice fed ad libitum. BDNF(+/-) mice exhibit an insulin-resistance syndrome phenotype characterized by elevated levels of circulating glucose, insulin, and leptin; DR reduces levels of each of these three factors. DR normalizes blood glucose responses in glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests in the BDNF(+/-) mice. These findings suggest that BDNF is a major regulator of energy metabolism and that beneficial effects of DR on glucose metabolism are mediated, in part, by BDNF signaling. Dietary and pharmacological manipulations of BDNF signaling may prove useful in the prevention and treatment of obesity and insulin resistance syndrome-related diseases.

Pubmed
Journal: Molecular medicine reports
March/16/2014
Abstract

Brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been demonstrated to be a potent growth factor that is beneficial in neuronal functions following hypoxia‑ischemia (HI). Mature BDNF triggers three enzymes, mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) and phosphoinositide phospholipase C-γ (PLCγ), which are its predominant downstream regulators. The PI3K‑Akt signaling pathway is upstream of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is important in the induction of autophagy. However, whether the neuroprotective effect of BDNF is mediated by autophagy through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway remains to be elucidated. Cortical neurons were cultured following isolation from pregnant rats (gestational days 16‑18). The induction of autophagy following BDNF treatment was analyzed by microtubule‑associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) conversion and autophagosome formation. The phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) was analyzed in cultured cells with or without BDNF treatment. Cell viability was determined by a Cell Counting Kit‑8 for estimating the protective effect of BDNF. Results demonstrated that autophagy was induced in cells with oxygen deprivation. BDNF promoted cell viability via the upregulation of autophagy. Moreover, LC3 upregulation was related to Akt/mTOR/p70S6K inhibition by BDNF. In conclusion, the results suggested that the neuroprotective effect of BDNF was mediated by autophagy through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

Pubmed
Journal: PloS one
May/13/2014
Abstract

The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is higher among patients receiving atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) treatment, and even among AAPs, treatment with clozapine has been shown to be associated with a higher long-term incidence rate of MetS. Likewise, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficiency has been reported to result in metabolic traits, such as increased food intake, hyperphagia and obesity, etc. In this study, we hypothesized that a functional polymorphism (Val66Met) in the BDNF gene may confer susceptibility to clozapine-induced MetS, potentially in a sex-specific manner, since an interaction between Val66Met polymorphism and sex was observed in our previous studies. A total of 199 schizophrenia patients being treated with clozapine were divided into two groups, MetS and non-MetS, based on the diagnostic criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. We genotyped the Val66Met polymorphism, and measured the serum levels of fasting glucose (GLU), triglyceride (TG) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL). There was a trend indicating a significant association between the homozygous Met/Met genotype and MetS in male patients (OR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.05-5.41; p = 0.039; corrected p = 0.078). Among the six risk factors listed in the ATPIII criteria, we found a significant association between fasting GLU levels and Val66Met polymorphism in males (p = 0.005; corrected p = 0.03), but not in females (p = 0.65). Post-hoc analysis in males revealed that the Met/Met carriers had significant higher levels of fasting GLU than those with Val/Val or Val/Met genotypes (p = 0.007; corrected p = 0.042 and p = 0.002; corrected p = 0.012, respectively). In conclusion, we observed a weak association between the Val66Met polymorphism and clozapine-induced MetS in a sex-specific manner. While preliminary, such findings prompt further, large-scale longitudinal studies to replicate these findings.

Pubmed
Journal: PloS one
July/22/2012
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies suggest that the responsiveness of TrkB receptor to BDNF is developmentally regulated in rats. Antidepressant drugs (AD) have been shown to increase TrkB signalling in the adult rodent brain, and recent findings implicate a BDNF-independent mechanism behind this phenomenon. When administered during early postnatal life, ADs produce long-lasting biochemical and behavioural alterations that are observed in adult animals.

METHODS

We have here examined the responsiveness of brain TrkB receptors to BDNF and ADs during early postnatal life of mouse, measured as autophosphorylation of TrkB (pTrkB).

RESULTS

We found that ADs fail to induce TrkB signalling before postnatal day 12 (P12) after which an adult response of TrkB to ADs was observed. Interestingly, there was a temporally inverse correlation between the appearance of the responsiveness of TrkB to systemic ADs and the marked developmental reduction of BDNF-induced TrkB in brain microslices ex vivo. Basal p-TrkB status in the brain of BDNF deficient mice was significantly reduced only during early postnatal period. Enhancing cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) signalling failed to facilitate TrkB responsiveness to BDNF. Reduced responsiveness of TrkB to BDNF was not produced by the developmental increase in the expression of dominant-negative truncated TrkB.T1 because this reduction was similarly observed in the brain microslices of trkB.T1(-/-) mice. Moreover, postnatal AD administration produced long-lasting behavioural alterations observable in adult mice, but the responses were different when mice were treated during the time when ADs did not (P4-9) or did (P16-21) activate TrkB.

CONCLUSIONS

We have found that ADs induce the activation of TrkB only in mice older than 2 weeks and that responsiveness of brain microslices to BDNF is reduced during the same time period. Exposure to ADs before and after the age when ADs activate TrkB produces differential long-term behavioural responses in adult mice.

Pubmed
Journal: Genes, brain, and behavior
September/9/2012
Abstract

The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66) Met allelic variation is linked to both the occurrence of mood disorders and antidepressant response. These findings are not universally observed, and the mechanism by which this variation results in increased risk for mood disorders is unclear. One possible explanation is an epistatic relationship with other neurotransmitter genes associated with depression risk, such as the serotonin-transporter-linked promotor region (5-HTTLPR). Further, it is unclear how the coexistence of the BDNF Met and 5-HTTLPR S variants affects the function of the affective and cognitive control systems. To address this question, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in 38 older adults (20 healthy and 18 remitted from major depressive disorder). Subjects performed an emotional oddball task during the fMRI scan and provided blood samples for genotyping. Our analyses examined the relationship between genotypes and brain activation to sad distractors and attentional targets. We found that 5-HTTLPR S allele carriers exhibited stronger activation in the amygdala in response to sad distractors, whereas BDNF Met carriers exhibited increased activation to sad stimuli but decreased activation to attentional targets in the dorsolateral prefrontal and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices. In addition, subjects with both the S allele and Met allele genes exhibited increased activation to sad stimuli in the subgenual cingulate and posterior cingulate. Our results indicate that the Met allele alone or in combination with 5-HTTLPR S allele may increase reactivity to sad stimuli, which might represent a neural mechanism underlying increased depression vulnerability.

Pubmed
Journal: Neurogenetics
July/12/2009
Abstract

The use of quantitative endophenotypes in genetic studies may provide greater power, allowing for the use of powerful statistical methods and a biological model for the effects of the disease-associated genetic variation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid beta (Abeta) levels are promising endophenotypes for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and show correlation with LOAD status and Abeta deposition. In this study, we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) positive in AlzGene ( http://www.alzgene.org ) meta-analyses, for association with CSF Abeta levels in 313 individuals. This study design makes it possible to replicate reported LOAD risk alleles while contributing novel information about the mechanism by which they might affect that risk. Alleles in ACE, APOE, BDNF, DAPK1, and TF are significantly associated with CSF Abeta levels. In vitro analysis of the TF SNP showed a change in secreted Abeta consistent with the CSF phenotype and known Alzheimer's disease variants, demonstrating the utility of this approach in identifying SNPs that influence risk for disease via an Abeta-related mechanism.

Pubmed
Journal: NeuroImage
June/9/2011
Abstract

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in learning and memory, but its effects on the fiber architecture of the living brain are unknown. We genotyped 455 healthy adult twins and their non-twin siblings (188 males/267 females; age: 23.7±2.1 years, mean±SD) and scanned them with high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to assess how the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism affects white matter microstructure. By applying genetic association analysis to every 3D point in the brain images, we found that the Val-BDNF genetic variant was associated with lower white matter integrity in the splenium of the corpus callosum, left optic radiation, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and superior corona radiata. Normal BDNF variation influenced the association between subjects' performance intellectual ability (as measured by Object Assembly subtest) and fiber integrity (as measured by fractional anisotropy; FA) in the callosal splenium, and pons. BDNF gene may affect the intellectual performance by modulating the white matter development. This combination of genetic association analysis and large-scale diffusion imaging directly relates a specific gene to the fiber microstructure of the living brain and to human intelligence.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
May/28/2012
Abstract

After peripheral nerve injury, neurotrophins play a key role in the regeneration of damaged axons that can be augmented by exercise, although the distinct roles played by neurons and Schwann cells are unclear. In this study, we evaluated the requirement for the neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in neurons and Schwann cells for the regeneration of peripheral axons after injury. Common fibular or tibial nerves in thy-1-YFP-H mice were cut bilaterally and repaired using a graft of the same nerve from transgenic mice lacking BDNF in Schwann cells (BDNF(-/-)) or wild-type mice (WT). Two weeks postrepair, axonal regeneration into BDNF(-/-) grafts was markedly less than WT grafts, emphasizing the importance of Schwann cell BDNF. Nerve regeneration was enhanced by treadmill training posttransection, regardless of the BDNF content of the nerve graft. We further tested the hypothesis that training-induced increases in BDNF in neurons allow regenerating axons to overcome a lack of BDNF expression in cells in the pathway through which they regenerate. Nerves in mice lacking BDNF in YFP(+) neurons (SLICK) were cut and repaired with BDNF(-/-) and WT nerves. SLICK axons lacking BDNF did not regenerate into grafts lacking Schwann cell BDNF. Treadmill training could not rescue the regeneration into BDNF(-/-) grafts if the neurons also lacked BDNF. Both Schwann cell- and neuron-derived BDNF are thus important for axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
December/1/2009
Abstract

We previously found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-haplodeficient mice exhibit greater ethanol-induced place preference and psychomotor sensitization, and greater ethanol consumption after deprivation, than control mice. We further observed that, in mice, voluntary ethanol intake increases BDNF expression in the dorsal striatum (DS). Here, we determined whether BDNF within the DS regulates ethanol self-administration in Long-Evans rats trained to self-administer a 10% ethanol solution. We observed a greater increase in BDNF expression after ethanol self-administration in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) than in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS). We further found that downregulation of endogenous BDNF using viral-mediated siRNA in the DLS, but not in the DMS, significantly increased ethanol self-administration. Infusion of exogenous BDNF (0.25 microg/microl/side into the DMS; 0.25 and 0.75 microg/microl/side into the DLS) attenuated responding for ethanol when infused 3 h before the beginning of the self-administration session. Although the decrease in ethanol intake was similar in the DLS and DMS, BDNF infused in the DLS, but not in the DMS, induced an early termination of the drinking episode. Furthermore, the action of BDNF in the DLS was specific for ethanol, as infusion of the neurotrophic factor in the DMS, but not DLS, resulted in a reduction of sucrose intake. Together, these findings demonstrate that the BDNF pathway within the DLS controls the level of ethanol self-administration. Importantly, our results suggest that an endogenous signaling pathway within the same brain region that mediates drug-taking behavior also plays a critical role in gating the level of ethanol intake.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
May/17/2012
Abstract

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays important roles in cell survival, neural plasticity, learning, and stress regulation. However, whether the recently found human BDNF Val66Met (BDNF(Met)) polymorphism could alter stress vulnerability remains controversial. More importantly, the molecular and structural mechanisms underlying the interaction between the BDNF(Met) polymorphism and stress are unclear. We found that heterozygous BDNF(+/Met) mice displayed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperreactivity, increased depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors, and impaired working memory compared with WT mice after 7 d restraint stress. Moreover, BDNF(+/Met) mice exhibited more prominent changes in BDNF levels and apical dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala after stress, which correlated with the impaired working memory and elevated anxiety-like behaviors. Finally, the depressive-like behaviors in BDNF(+/Met) mice could be selectively rescued by acute administration of desipramine but not fluoxetine. These data indicate selective behavioral, molecular, and structural deficits resulting from the interaction between stress and the human genetic BDNF(Met) polymorphism. Importantly, desipramine but not fluoxetine has antidepressant effects on BDNF(+/Met) mice, suggesting that specific classes of antidepressant may be a more effective treatment option for depressive symptoms in humans with this genetic variant BDNF.

Pubmed
Journal: Brain research. Molecular brain research
March/6/2000
Abstract

There are two populations of neurons which are continually renewed in the adult, the dentate gyrus granule neurons and the olfactory bulb granule and periglomerular neurons. In the dentate gyrus, a secondary proliferative zone termed the subgranular zone is established along the interface between the dentate gyrus and the hilus where granule cells are born throughout life. Olfactory bulb neurons are generated in the anterior subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and migrate via the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. We examined animals lacking brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in order to establish whether this neurotrophin could be involved in the generation and/or survival of these neurons in vivo. We find that cells in nestin-positive regions of both the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the olfactory bulb undergo apoptosis starting 2 weeks after birth in the absence of BDNF. However, increased apoptosis was not limited to precursors, as apoptotic cells were also found in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and in the granule and periglomerular layers of the olfactory bulb. The excessive cell death was limited to these populations of neurons as no excessive cell death was detected in other forebrain areas. We conclude that BDNF is essential for the survival of neurons specifically in populations which are continuously being regenerated in the brain.

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