Obesity
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Pubmed
Journal: Journal of clinical densitometry : the official journal of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry
January/7/2013
Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that changes in hip geometry increase the risk of hip fracture. The aim of this study was to identify whether body composition were associated with hip geometry or bone mineral density (BMD) in a large sample of Chinese people. A total of 2072 subjects aged 20-79 yr (including 700 males and 1372 females) were selected. The following measurements were taken: lumbar spine (L1-4); proximal femur BMD; lean mass (LM); fat mass (FM); and hip geometric parameters, including hip axis length (HAL), cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), cross-sectional area (CSA), neck-shaft angle, and femur strength index (SI) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. FM and LM were positively correlated with HAL, CSMI, and CSA, and negatively correlated with SI in both men and women. Multiple regression analysis showed that leg LM contributions to HAL, CSMI, and CSA variance were 12.6-37.6%. Compared with FM, LM was generally more strongly related to hip geometry and BMD in young and old men and women. Body composition was a good predictor for hip geometry parameter variation and BMD variation.

Pubmed
Journal: Biomolecular concepts
January/28/2016
Abstract

Genetic and environmental factors, especially nutrition and lifestyle, have been discussed in the literature for their relevance to epidemic obesity. Gene-environment interactions may need to be understood for an improved understanding of the causes of obesity, and epigenetic mechanisms are of special importance. Consequences of epigenetic mechanisms seem to be particularly important during certain periods of life: prenatal, postnatal and intergenerational, transgenerational inheritance are discussed with relevance to obesity. This review focuses on nutrients, diet and habits influencing intergenerational, transgenerational, prenatal and postnatal epigenetics; on evidence of epigenetic modifiers in adulthood; and on animal models for the study of obesity.

Pubmed
Journal: Appetite
September/17/1986
Abstract

Recent findings in this laboratory with regard to tolerance to fenfluramine anorexia are reviewed with respect to generality of the behavioural phenomenon. A systematic relationship between initial body weight and fenfluramine-induced weight change in rats is described. The possible roles of peripheral factors in fenfluramine anorexia and tolerances, including gastric emptying and peripheral serotonin, are discussed. The role of central factors is also considered. It appears that fenfluramine, and possibly other anorectic agents have multiple sites of action and affect multiple behaviours. Some clinical implications are noted.

Pubmed
Journal: The American journal of gastroenterology
April/27/2008
Abstract

Obesity is a recognized risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The impact of obesity on the risk of Barrett's esophagus is unclear. This is addressed by a systematic review in this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology using additional data given by the authors of individual observational studies. The review suggests that although obesity is a risk factor of Barrett's esophagus, it is probably not a direct effect and is likely to be due to the association with GERD. As obesity is a strong risk factor of esophageal adenocarcinoma, more data are needed in this area. In particular, more research is needed on visceral adipose tissue and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma, and whether obesity is an important risk factor for the development of neoplasia in those with Barrett's esophagus.

Pubmed
Journal: International journal for vitamin and nutrition research. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal international de vitaminologie et de nutrition
May/31/2007
Abstract

Obesity is considered a major Public Health issue in most developed countries nowadays for its wide spread across population groups, as well as its contribution to the development of chronic diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Available population data in Spain from the SEEDO'2000 study show a prevalence of obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2)) of 14,5% in adults aged 25-60 years, estimates based on individual measurement of body weight and height. Obesity rates are higher among women aged 45 years and older, low social class, living in semi-urban places. Geographical distribution of the problem shows a trend for higher rates towards the South- SouthEast of the country, i.e. Andalucía, Murcia and the Canary Islands. Population data for Spanish children and young people based on the enKid study--cross-sectional study on a random national sample of the population aged 2-24 years--estimate a prevalence of obesity of 13.9% for the whole group. Geographical distribution draws a similar pattern to that described for adults. Higher peaks of the problem are identified between 9-13 years among boys from a low socioeconomical background. The analysis of determinants of obesity in Spanish children and young people show that overweight and obesity is related to absence of breastfeeding, low consumption of fruit and vegetables; high consumption of cakes and buns, soft drinks and butchery products, low physical activity levels and a positive association with time spent watching TV. The joint consensus document produced by the Spanish Association of Pediatrics (AEP), Spanish Society of Community Nutrition (SENC) and Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity (SEEDO) considers a global strategy for the prevention of obesity from early stages in life. The important role of the family and the school setting as well as the responsibility of the Health Administration and Pediatric care in the prevention of obesity is highlighted in the document.

Pubmed
Journal: Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association
December/12/2016
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Obesity is associated with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer, but it is unclear whether it affects mortality. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between premorbid obesity and mortality from pancreatic cancer.

METHODS

We performed a systematic search through January 2015 and identified studies of the association between premorbid obesity (at least 1 year prior to pancreatic cancer diagnosis) and pancreatic cancer-related mortality. We estimated summary adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), comparing data from obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight subjects (BMI, 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) with those from individuals with a normal BMI (controls) by using random-effects model.

RESULTS

We identified 13 studies (including 3 studies that pooled multiple cohorts); 5 studies included only patients with pancreatic cancer, whereas 8 studies evaluated pancreatic cancer-related mortality in cancer-free individuals at inception. In the meta-analysis, we observed increase in pancreatic cancer-related mortality among overweight (aHR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11; I(2) = 0) and obese individuals (aHR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.20-1.42; I(2) = 43%), compared with controls; the association remained when we analyzed data from only subjects with pancreatic cancer. Each 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI was associated with 10% increase in mortality (aHR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.05-1.15) with minimal heterogeneity (I(2) = 0). In the subgroup analysis, obesity was associated with increased mortality in Western populations (11 studies; aHR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.22-1.42) but not in Asia-Pacific populations (2 studies; aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.76-1.27).

CONCLUSIONS

In a systematic review and meta-analysis, we associated increasing level of obesity with increased mortality in patients with pancreatic cancer in Western but not Asia-Pacific populations. Strategies to reduce obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities might be developed to treat patients with pancreatic cancer.

Pubmed
Journal: Psychosomatics
December/12/2016
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with schizophrenia have high rates of obesity and cardiovascular morbidity, which are strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The prevalence and risk factors for OSA are not well studied in patients with schizophrenia.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of OSA symptoms in a sample of outpatients with schizophrenia.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study was a secondary analysis of data generated from an insomnia study that evaluated 175 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a single, large urban community mental health center. Results of scales evaluating insomnia were used to complete the STOP questionnaire, which is a screening tool for OSA validated in surgical populations. Appropriate statistical analysis was done to compare participants across groups.

RESULTS

Patients were classified into high risk for OSA (STOP ≥ 2) (57.7%), and low risk for OSA (STOP score < 2) (42.3%). We also identified patients with a known diagnosis of OSA (14.9%). Patients with diagnosed OSA had significantly higher STOP scores (mean 2.7 vs. 1.6 [t = 6.3; p < 0.001]). Only 23.8% of patients in the high-risk group were diagnosed with OSA. Body mass index was significantly higher in the diagnosed group (F[2,169] = 25; p < 0.001) as was diabetes (χ2 [2, N = 175] = 35, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

A large number of outpatients with severe mental illness are at high risk for OSA. The STOP questionnaire is easy to use and appears to have a very high clinical utility to detect OSA. Based on our findings, further studies are warranted to validate the tool in patients with severe mental illness.

Pubmed
Journal: JAMA internal medicine
June/14/2017
Abstract

Weight gain occurs commonly in young adults and has adverse effects on health.

To compare 2 self-regulation interventions vs control in reducing weight gain in young adults over a mean follow-up of 3 years.

Randomized clinical trial in 2 academic settings of 599 participants aged 18 to 35 years with body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 21.0 to 30.0, recruited via mailings and emails from August 2010 to February 2012. Data were analyzed from January 2015 to January 2016.

Participants were randomized to control, self-regulation plus small changes, or self-regulation plus large changes. Both interventions focused on frequent self-weighing to cue behavior changes. "Small changes" taught participants to reduce intake and increase activity, both by approximately 100 calories per day. "Large changes" focused on losing 2.3 to 4.5 kg initially to buffer against expected weight gain.

Changes in weight from baseline over mean follow-up of 3 years. Secondary outcomes included proportion gaining at least 0.45 kg from baseline, proportion developing obesity (BMI, ≥30.0), and weight change baseline to 2 years.

Among the 599 participants (22% men; 27% minority; mean [SD] age, 27.7 [4.4] years; mean [SD] BMI, 25.4 [2.6]), mean (SE) weight changes over a mean follow-up of 3 years were 0.26 (0.22), -0.56 (0.22), and -2.37 (0.22) kg in the control, small-changes, and large-changes groups, respectively (P < .001). Differences among all 3 groups were significant (large changes vs control, P < .001; small changes vs control, P = .02; large changes vs small changes, P < .001). On secondary outcomes, both interventions significantly reduced incidence of obesity relative to control (mean [SE], 8.6% [2.0%], 7.9% [2.0%], and 16.9% [2.7%] in the large-changes, small-changes, and control groups, respectively; P = .02 for large changes vs control and P = .002 for small changes vs control); a smaller percentage of participants in the large-changes group gained 0.45 kg or more (mean [SE], 23.6% [2.8%], 32.5% [3.8%], and 40.8% [4.4%], respectively; P < .001 vs control and P = .02 vs small changes) and weight change from baseline to 2 years was greater in control than in small or large changes (mean [SE], 0.54 [0.33], -0.77 [0.33], and -1.50 [0.34] kg, respectively; P = .02 vs small changes and P < .001 vs large changes).

Self-regulation with large or small changes both reduced weight gain in young adults over 3 years relative to control, but the large-changes intervention was more effective.

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01183689.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
May/23/2017
Abstract

High body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better outcome in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Persistent inflammation commonly features in clinical conditions where the obesity paradox is described. We examined the relationship between BMI and mortality in HD patients, accounting for inflammation, in a historic cohort study of 5904 incident HD patients enrolled in 2007-2009 (312 facilities; 15 European countries) with ≥3 months of follow-up. Patients were classified by presence (n=3231) or absence (n=2673) of inflammation (C-reactive protein ≥10 mg/l and/or albumin ≤35 g/l). Patients were divided into quintiles by BMI (Q1-Q5: <21.5, 21.5-24.0, >24.0-26.4, >26.4-29.8, and >29.8 kg/m(2), respectively). Noninflamed patients in BMI Q5 formed the reference group. During a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, 1929 deaths occurred (822 cardiovascular), with 655 patients censored for renal transplantation and 1183 for loss to follow-up. Greater mortality was observed in inflamed patients (P<0.001). In fully adjusted time-dependent analyses, the all-cause mortality risk in noninflamed patients was higher only in the lowest BMI quintile (hazard ratio [HR, 1.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.26 to 2.56). No protective effect was associated with higher BMI quintiles in noninflamed patients. Conversely, higher BMI associated with lower all-cause mortality risk in inflamed patients (HR [95% CI] for Q1: 5.63 [4.25 to 7.46]; Q2: 3.88 [2.91 to 5.17]; Q3: 2.89 [2.16 to 3.89]; Q4: 2.14 [1.59 to 2.90]; and Q5: 1.77 [1.30 to 2.40]). Thus, whereas a protective effect of high BMI was observed in inflamed patients, this effect was mitigated in noninflamed patients.

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