Obesity
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Pubmed
Journal: Journal of clinical densitometry : the official journal of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry
January/7/2013
Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that changes in hip geometry increase the risk of hip fracture. The aim of this study was to identify whether body composition were associated with hip geometry or bone mineral density (BMD) in a large sample of Chinese people. A total of 2072 subjects aged 20-79 yr (including 700 males and 1372 females) were selected. The following measurements were taken: lumbar spine (L1-4); proximal femur BMD; lean mass (LM); fat mass (FM); and hip geometric parameters, including hip axis length (HAL), cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), cross-sectional area (CSA), neck-shaft angle, and femur strength index (SI) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. FM and LM were positively correlated with HAL, CSMI, and CSA, and negatively correlated with SI in both men and women. Multiple regression analysis showed that leg LM contributions to HAL, CSMI, and CSA variance were 12.6-37.6%. Compared with FM, LM was generally more strongly related to hip geometry and BMD in young and old men and women. Body composition was a good predictor for hip geometry parameter variation and BMD variation.

Pubmed
Journal: Nature
October/18/2015
Pubmed
Journal: Biomolecular concepts
January/28/2016
Abstract

Genetic and environmental factors, especially nutrition and lifestyle, have been discussed in the literature for their relevance to epidemic obesity. Gene-environment interactions may need to be understood for an improved understanding of the causes of obesity, and epigenetic mechanisms are of special importance. Consequences of epigenetic mechanisms seem to be particularly important during certain periods of life: prenatal, postnatal and intergenerational, transgenerational inheritance are discussed with relevance to obesity. This review focuses on nutrients, diet and habits influencing intergenerational, transgenerational, prenatal and postnatal epigenetics; on evidence of epigenetic modifiers in adulthood; and on animal models for the study of obesity.

Pubmed
Journal: The American journal of gastroenterology
April/27/2008
Abstract

Obesity is a recognized risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The impact of obesity on the risk of Barrett's esophagus is unclear. This is addressed by a systematic review in this issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology using additional data given by the authors of individual observational studies. The review suggests that although obesity is a risk factor of Barrett's esophagus, it is probably not a direct effect and is likely to be due to the association with GERD. As obesity is a strong risk factor of esophageal adenocarcinoma, more data are needed in this area. In particular, more research is needed on visceral adipose tissue and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma, and whether obesity is an important risk factor for the development of neoplasia in those with Barrett's esophagus.

Pubmed
Journal: Psychosomatics
December/12/2016
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with schizophrenia have high rates of obesity and cardiovascular morbidity, which are strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The prevalence and risk factors for OSA are not well studied in patients with schizophrenia.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of OSA symptoms in a sample of outpatients with schizophrenia.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study was a secondary analysis of data generated from an insomnia study that evaluated 175 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a single, large urban community mental health center. Results of scales evaluating insomnia were used to complete the STOP questionnaire, which is a screening tool for OSA validated in surgical populations. Appropriate statistical analysis was done to compare participants across groups.

RESULTS

Patients were classified into high risk for OSA (STOP ≥ 2) (57.7%), and low risk for OSA (STOP score < 2) (42.3%). We also identified patients with a known diagnosis of OSA (14.9%). Patients with diagnosed OSA had significantly higher STOP scores (mean 2.7 vs. 1.6 [t = 6.3; p < 0.001]). Only 23.8% of patients in the high-risk group were diagnosed with OSA. Body mass index was significantly higher in the diagnosed group (F[2,169] = 25; p < 0.001) as was diabetes (χ2 [2, N = 175] = 35, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

A large number of outpatients with severe mental illness are at high risk for OSA. The STOP questionnaire is easy to use and appears to have a very high clinical utility to detect OSA. Based on our findings, further studies are warranted to validate the tool in patients with severe mental illness.

Pubmed
Journal: JAMA internal medicine
June/14/2017
Abstract

Weight gain occurs commonly in young adults and has adverse effects on health.

To compare 2 self-regulation interventions vs control in reducing weight gain in young adults over a mean follow-up of 3 years.

Randomized clinical trial in 2 academic settings of 599 participants aged 18 to 35 years with body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 21.0 to 30.0, recruited via mailings and emails from August 2010 to February 2012. Data were analyzed from January 2015 to January 2016.

Participants were randomized to control, self-regulation plus small changes, or self-regulation plus large changes. Both interventions focused on frequent self-weighing to cue behavior changes. "Small changes" taught participants to reduce intake and increase activity, both by approximately 100 calories per day. "Large changes" focused on losing 2.3 to 4.5 kg initially to buffer against expected weight gain.

Changes in weight from baseline over mean follow-up of 3 years. Secondary outcomes included proportion gaining at least 0.45 kg from baseline, proportion developing obesity (BMI, ≥30.0), and weight change baseline to 2 years.

Among the 599 participants (22% men; 27% minority; mean [SD] age, 27.7 [4.4] years; mean [SD] BMI, 25.4 [2.6]), mean (SE) weight changes over a mean follow-up of 3 years were 0.26 (0.22), -0.56 (0.22), and -2.37 (0.22) kg in the control, small-changes, and large-changes groups, respectively (P < .001). Differences among all 3 groups were significant (large changes vs control, P < .001; small changes vs control, P = .02; large changes vs small changes, P < .001). On secondary outcomes, both interventions significantly reduced incidence of obesity relative to control (mean [SE], 8.6% [2.0%], 7.9% [2.0%], and 16.9% [2.7%] in the large-changes, small-changes, and control groups, respectively; P = .02 for large changes vs control and P = .002 for small changes vs control); a smaller percentage of participants in the large-changes group gained 0.45 kg or more (mean [SE], 23.6% [2.8%], 32.5% [3.8%], and 40.8% [4.4%], respectively; P < .001 vs control and P = .02 vs small changes) and weight change from baseline to 2 years was greater in control than in small or large changes (mean [SE], 0.54 [0.33], -0.77 [0.33], and -1.50 [0.34] kg, respectively; P = .02 vs small changes and P < .001 vs large changes).

Self-regulation with large or small changes both reduced weight gain in young adults over 3 years relative to control, but the large-changes intervention was more effective.

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01183689.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
May/23/2017
Abstract

High body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better outcome in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Persistent inflammation commonly features in clinical conditions where the obesity paradox is described. We examined the relationship between BMI and mortality in HD patients, accounting for inflammation, in a historic cohort study of 5904 incident HD patients enrolled in 2007-2009 (312 facilities; 15 European countries) with ≥3 months of follow-up. Patients were classified by presence (n=3231) or absence (n=2673) of inflammation (C-reactive protein ≥10 mg/l and/or albumin ≤35 g/l). Patients were divided into quintiles by BMI (Q1-Q5: <21.5, 21.5-24.0, >24.0-26.4, >26.4-29.8, and >29.8 kg/m(2), respectively). Noninflamed patients in BMI Q5 formed the reference group. During a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, 1929 deaths occurred (822 cardiovascular), with 655 patients censored for renal transplantation and 1183 for loss to follow-up. Greater mortality was observed in inflamed patients (P<0.001). In fully adjusted time-dependent analyses, the all-cause mortality risk in noninflamed patients was higher only in the lowest BMI quintile (hazard ratio [HR, 1.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.26 to 2.56). No protective effect was associated with higher BMI quintiles in noninflamed patients. Conversely, higher BMI associated with lower all-cause mortality risk in inflamed patients (HR [95% CI] for Q1: 5.63 [4.25 to 7.46]; Q2: 3.88 [2.91 to 5.17]; Q3: 2.89 [2.16 to 3.89]; Q4: 2.14 [1.59 to 2.90]; and Q5: 1.77 [1.30 to 2.40]). Thus, whereas a protective effect of high BMI was observed in inflamed patients, this effect was mitigated in noninflamed patients.

Pubmed
Journal: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)
May/28/2017
Abstract

To compare four subgroups of adults with overweight/obesity: those with binge-eating disorder (BED) only, food addiction (FA) only, both BED + FA, and neither.

For this study, 502 individuals with overweight/obesity (body mass index >25 kg/m(2) ) completed a Web-based survey with established measures of eating and health-related behaviors. Most were female (n = 415; 83.2%) and White (n = 404; 80.8%); mean age and body mass index were 38.0 (SD = 13.1) years and 33.6 (SD = 6.9) kg/m(2) , respectively.

Among 502 participants with overweight/obesity, 43 (8.5%) met BED criteria, 84 (16.6%) met FA criteria, 51 (10.1%) met both BED + FA criteria, and 328 (64.8%) met neither (control). The three groups with eating pathology (BED, FA, and BED + FA) had significantly greater disturbances on most measures (eating disorder psychopathology, impulsivity, and self-control) than the control group, while the FA and BED + FA groups reported significantly higher depression scores relative to the control group. The three eating groups did not differ significantly from each other.

In this online survey, of those with overweight/obesity, nearly one third met criteria for BED, FA, or BED + FA, and these forms of disordered eating were associated with greater pathology relative to individuals with overweight/obesity without BED and FA. Future research should examine whether the presence of BED, FA, or co-occurring BED + FA requires tailored interventions in individuals with overweight or obesity.

Pubmed
Journal: Nutricion hospitalaria
January/5/2010
Abstract

Elevated plasma uric acid levels are associated with obesity and could be an expression of insulin-resistant state. The aim of the present study was to evaluate plasma uric acid in obese and normal-weight children exclusively at prepubertal stage and its relationship with anthropometric measurements, intake, and features of the insulin resistance syndrome. A study was performed in 34 obese and 20 normal-weight prepubertal children. Nutrient intake was determined using a 72 h recall questionnaire and a consumption food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric parameters and fasting plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and uric acid were measured. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify association of anthropometric parameters, nutrient intake and insulin resistance syndrome variables (arterial blood pressure, plasma glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index- HOMA- triacylglycerols and, HDL-cholesterol) with uric acid. Plasma uric concentration was significantly higher in the obese group than in the control group and when adjusted by sex, age and BMI was positively associated with tricipital skinfold and insulin resistance, and negatively with adiponectin. In multiple regression analysis, BMI, HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin were independent predictors of plasma uric acid. In conclusion, elevated levels of uric acid in obese children, compared with lean subjects, at the prepubertal period, seems to be an early metabolic alteration that is associated with other features of insulin resistance syndrome.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
October/18/2016
Abstract

Diet-induced weight loss has been suggested to be harmful to bone health. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (using a random-effects model) to quantify the effect of diet-induced weight loss on bone. We included 41 publications involving overweight or obese but otherwise healthy adults who followed a dietary weight-loss intervention. The primary outcomes examined were changes from baseline in total hip, lumbar spine, and total body bone mineral density (BMD), as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Secondary outcomes were markers of bone turnover. Diet-induced weight loss was associated with significant decreases of 0.010 to 0.015 g/cm(2) in total hip BMD for interventions of 6, 12, or 24 (but not 3) months' duration (95% confidence intervals [CIs], -0.014 to -0.005, -0.021 to -0.008, and -0.024 to -0.000 g/cm(2), at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively). There was, however, no statistically significant effect of diet-induced weight loss on lumbar spine or whole-body BMD for interventions of 3 to 24 months' duration, except for a significant decrease in total body BMD (-0.011 g/cm(2); 95% CI, -0.018 to -0.003 g/cm(2)) after 6 months. Although no statistically significant changes occurred in serum concentrations of N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP), interventions of 2 or 3 months in duration (but not of 6, 12, or 24 months' duration) induced significant increases in serum concentrations of osteocalcin (0.26 nmol/L; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39 nmol/L), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) (4.72 nmol/L; 95% CI, 2.12 to 7.30 nmol/L) or N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) (3.70 nmol/L; 95% CI, 0.90 to 6.50 nmol/L bone collagen equivalents [BCEs]), indicating an early effect of diet-induced weight loss to promote bone breakdown. These data show that in overweight and obese individuals, a single diet-induced weight-loss intervention induces a small decrease in total hip BMD, but not lumbar spine BMD. This decrease is small in comparison to known metabolic benefits of losing excess weight.

Pubmed
Journal: Maturitas
June/10/2009
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

During the 1990s, use of home care sector has increased substantially in Europe. However, research on home care continues to be underreported. This article summarizes the findings from the "Aged in Home Care" (ADHOC) study - carried out from 2001 to 2004 in Europe - and women's situation in European Home Care.

METHODS

The review is based on 4 book chapters as well as on 23 articles listed in PubMed and published from August 2004 to October 2008. ADHOC used a standardized data set collected with the Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC 2.0); this instrument was used to assess 4010 home care clients at 11 European sites. The included articles analyzed the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, basic physical needs, provision of selected preventive measures, and medication data from the ADHOC sample. In addition home service provision, quality indicators, and selected outcomes of home care intervention during the course of 1 year were assessed.

RESULTS

The mean subject age was 82.3 years; women were on average 2 years older than men and more frequently lived alone, 74% were women. Women suffered more frequently from pain, depression, and extreme obesity. There were marked regional differences in both the functional status of the clients and the characteristics and use of home care services.

CONCLUSIONS

The implementation of a common assessment instrument for HC clients may help contribute the necessary wealth of data for (re)shaping home care in Europe. Policy makers and service providers may learn about best practices in the European context.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of clinical anesthesia
July/4/2001
Authors
Pubmed
Journal: The American journal of clinical nutrition
August/18/2003
Pubmed
Journal: Science translational medicine
October/24/2016
Abstract

This review discusses current and future pharmacological approaches to the treatment of obesity, with a focus on the biological control of energy balance.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of diabetes and its complications
December/12/2016
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diabetes has been hypothesized to increase the risk of gallbladder disease based on the observation that obesity and insulin resistance are associated with gallbladder disease. Although several studies have investigated the association between a diabetes diagnosis and risk of gallbladder disease, the results have not been entirely consistent. For this reason we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available cohort studies.

METHODS

We searched the PubMed and Embase databases for studies of diabetes and gallbladder disease (defined as gallstones, cholecystectomy, or cholecystitis) up to January 9th 2015. Prospective studies were included if they reported relative risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals of gallbladder disease associated with a diabetes diagnosis. Summary relative risks were estimated by use of a random effects model.

RESULTS

We identified 10 prospective studies that could be included in the meta-analysis which included 223,651 cases among 7,365,198 participants. The summary RR for diabetes patients was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.26-1.93, I(2)=99.4%, pheterogeneity<0.0001). The results persisted when stratified by gender, and in most subgroup analyses and there was no heterogeneity among studies with more than 10 years duration of follow-up. There was no evidence of publication bias.

CONCLUSIONS

Our analysis provides further support for an increased risk of gallbladder disease among diabetes patients.

Pubmed
Journal: Preventive medicine
December/12/2016
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Most studies on multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents have cross-sectionally studied a limited number of health behaviors or determinants.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the prevalence, longitudinal patterns and predictors of individual and multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents.

METHODS

Eight health risk behaviors (no regular consumption of fruit, vegetables or breakfast, overweight or obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, alcohol use and cannabis use) were assessed in a prospective population study (second and third wave). Participants were assessed in three waves between ages 10 and 17 (2001-2008; n=2230). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the influence of gender, self-control, parental health risk behaviors, parental monitoring and socioeconomic factors on the number of health risk behaviors adjusted for preceding multiple health risk behaviors (analysis: 2013-2014).

RESULTS

Rates of >5 health risk behaviors were high: 3.6% at age 13.5 and 10.2% at age 16. Smoking at age 13.5 was frequently associated with health risk behaviors at age 16. No regular consumption of fruit, vegetables and breakfast, overweight or obesity, physical inactivity and smoking predicted the co-occurrence of health risk behaviors at follow-up. Significant predictors of the development of multiple health risk behaviors were adolescents' levels of self-control, socioeconomic status and maternal smoking.

CONCLUSIONS

Multiple health risk behaviors are common among adolescents. Individual and social factors predict changes in multiple health risk behaviors, showing that prevention targeting multiple risk behaviors is needed. Special attention should be paid to adolescents with low self-control and families with low socioeconomic status or a mother who smokes.

Pubmed
Journal: Cardiovascular research
December/12/2016
Abstract

The amount of adipose tissue that accumulates around the atria is associated with the risk, persistence, and severity of atrial fibrillation (AF). A strong body of clinical and experimental evidence indicates that this relationship is not an epiphenomenon but is the result of complex crosstalk between the adipose tissue and the neighbouring atrial myocardium. For instance, epicardial adipose tissue is a major source of adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, or reactive oxidative species, which can contribute to the fibrotic remodelling of the atrial myocardium. Fibro-fatty infiltrations of the subepicardium could also contribute to the functional disorganization of the atrial myocardium. The observation that obesity is associated with distinct structural and functional remodelling of the atria has opened new perspectives of treating AF substrate with aggressive risk factor management. Advances in cardiac imaging should lead to an improved ability to visualize myocardial fat depositions and to localize AF substrates.

Pubmed
Journal: Dermatology (Basel, Switzerland)
June/15/1999
Abstract

We report on a 27-year-old man with acanthosis nigricans (AN) associated with severe obesity, insulin resistance and hypothyroidism. A very low-calorie diet treatment decreased his weight and then ameliorated the insulin-resistant state. These effects were followed by remarkable improvement of the AN prior to the correction of the hypothyroidism. This confirms that AN may be mainly attributed to insulin resistance rather than hypothyroidism per se.

Pubmed
Journal: Hormone molecular biology and clinical investigation
June/11/2015
Abstract

Glucocorticoids (GC) and their cognate intracellular receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), have been characterised as critical checkpoints in the endocrine control of energy homeostasis in mammals. Indeed, aberrant GC action has been linked to a variety of severe metabolic diseases, including obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. As a steroid-binding member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors, the GR translocates into the cell nucleus upon GC binding where it serves as a transcriptional regulator of distinct GC-responsive target genes that are - in many cases - associated with glucose and lipid regulatory pathways and thereby intricately control both physiological and pathophysiological systemic energy homeostasis. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of GC/GR function in energy metabolism and systemic metabolic dysfunction, particularly focusing on glucose and lipid metabolism.

Pubmed
Journal: Annals of internal medicine
November/12/2013
Pubmed
Journal: Clinical endocrinology
April/20/2000
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study explored leptin concentrations in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a genetic disorder characterized by significant obesity and presumed hypothalamic dysfunction. The potential interaction of leptin metabolism with the growth hormone (GH) axis was also studied.

METHODS

Plasma leptin concentrations and percent body fat were determined by radioimmunoassay and dual energy x-ray absorptionmetry, respectively, in 23 children with Prader-Willi syndrome and 23 children with exogenous obesity.

RESULTS

Log plasma leptin concentrations were positively correlated with percentage body fat in PWS (r = 0.844) and exogenous obesity (r = 0.869). When the regression lines for the two groups were compared, there were no differences in their slopes (P = 0.737) or intercepts (P = 0.701). Administration of recombinant human growth hormone to PWS children for 12 months significantly reduced both percentage body fat and plasma leptin concentrations, but the relationship of log plasma leptin to percentage body fat was unchanged.

CONCLUSIONS

Prader-Willi syndrome is not accompanied by deranged leptin concentrations and there was no evidence of an interaction of the GH axis with leptin metabolism in these GH-deficient children.

Pubmed
Journal: Transplantation
April/10/1988
Pubmed
Journal: Research communications in chemical pathology and pharmacology
June/8/1988
Abstract

Since cyclosporine is heavily bound to plasma lipoproteins, its pharmacokinetic profile was evaluated in the Zucker hyperlipidemic rat model (N = 4) and compared to Zucker lean (N = 4) and Sprague-Dawley (N = 4) rat models. Following a single i.v. dose (5 mg/kg) of cyclosporine, serial blood samples, collected by tail bleed, were assayed for cyclosporine concentration by radioimmunoassay. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed by standard non-compartmental methods. Half-lives between the three groups were not different. However, Zucker obese rats demonstrated a significantly smaller volume of distribution at steady-state (2.8 +/- 1.1 L/kg; p less than 0.01) versus the Zucker lean (5.4 +/- .9 L/kg) and Sprague-Dawley rats (5.6 +/- .7 L/kg). Likewise, the total body clearance was markedly reduced in the obese (0.24 +/- .09 L/h/kg; p less than 0.01) versus lean (0.51 +/- .04 L/h/kg) and Sprague-Dawley (0.52 +/- .06 L/h/kg) rat models. This data suggests the ability of lipids to significantly impair the intracellular transfer of cyclosporine and may impact on its clinical monitoring, efficacy and toxicity.

Pubmed
Journal: Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry
August/16/1999
Abstract

1. To assess the role of insulin in the development of the obesity induced by antipsychotic drugs, a glucose tolerance test was conducted in female rats after 0 or 30 days of sulpiride administration. 2. At day 10, the area under the glucose curve did not differ between sulpiride and vehicle-treated rats, however, the area under the insulin curve was significantly decreased by sulpiride. At day, 30 the insulin response was similar in both groups, but the area under the glucose curve was significantly lower in the sulpiride-treated rats. 3. The results suggest that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are not involved in the development and maintenance of the obesity induced by sulpiride. Contrarily, these findings may be related to an increased insulin sensitivity. 4. The absence of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance indicates important differences between primary obesity in humans and rodents and this model of drug-induced excessive weight gain.

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