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Pubmed
Journal: Anesthesia and analgesia
August/13/2017
Abstract

Although it is generally believed that oxidative phosphorylation and adequate oxygenation are essential for life, human development occurs in a profoundly hypoxic environment and "normal" levels of oxygen during embryogenesis are even harmful. The ability of embryos not only to survive but also to thrive in such an environment is made possible by adaptations related to metabolic pathways. Similarly, cancerous cells are able not only to survive but also to grow and spread in environments that would typically be fatal for healthy adult cells. Many biological states, both normal and pathological, share underlying similarities related to metabolism, the electron transport chain, and reactive species. The purpose of Part I of this review is to review the similarities among embryogenesis, mammalian adaptions to hypoxia (primarily driven by hypoxia-inducible factor-1), ischemia-reperfusion injury (and its relationship with reactive oxygen species), hibernation, diving animals, cancer, and sepsis, with a particular focus on the common characteristics that allow cells and organisms to survive in these states.

Pubmed
Journal: Oncogene
September/14/2017
Abstract

Miniature chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins play critical roles in DNA replication licensing, initiation and elongation. MCM8, one of the MCM proteins playing a critical role in DNA repairing and recombination, was found to have overexpression and increased DNA copy number in a variety of human malignancies. The gain of MCM8 is associated with aggressive clinical features of several human cancers. Increased expression of MCM8 in prostate cancer is associated with cancer recurrence. Forced expression of MCM8 in RWPE1 cells, the immortalized but non-transformed prostate epithelial cell line, exhibited fast cell growth and transformation, while knock down of MCM8 in PC3, DU145 and LNCaP cells induced cell growth arrest, and decreased tumour volumes and mortality of severe combined immunodeficiency mice xenografted with PC3 and DU145 cells. MCM8 bound cyclin D1 and activated Rb protein phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 4 in vitro and in vivo. The cyclin D1/MCM8 interaction is required for Rb phosphorylation and S-phase entry in cancer cells. As a result, our study showed that copy number increase and overexpression of MCM8 may play critical roles in human cancer development.

Authors
Pubmed
Journal: BMC genomics
September/10/2017
Abstract

DNA methylation is the major form of epigenetic modifications through which the cell regulates the gene expression and silencing. There have been extensive studies on the roles of DNA methylation in cancers, and several cancer drugs were developed targeting this process. However, DNA co-methylation cluster has not been examined in depth, and co-methylation in multiple cancer types has never been studied previously.

In this study, we applied newly developed lmQCM algorithm to mine co-methylation clusters using methylome data from 11 cancer types in TCGA database, and found frequent co-methylated gene clusters exist in these cancer types. Among the four identified frequent clusters, two of them separate the tumor sample from normal sample in 10 out of 11 cancer types, which indicates that consistent epigenetic landscape changes exist in multiple cancer types.

This discovery provides new insight on the epigenetic regulation in cancers and leads to potential new direction for epigenetic biomarker and cancer drug discovery. We also found that genes commonly believed to be silenced via hypermethylation in cancers may still display highly variable methylation levels among cancer cells, and should be considered while using them as epigenetic biomarkers.

Pubmed
Journal: EBioMedicine
September/20/2018
Abstract

Existing explanations of obesity-associated cancer emphasise direct mutagenic effects of dietary components or hormonal imbalance. Some of these hypotheses are reviewed briefly, but recent evidence suggests a major role for chronic inflammation in cancer risk, possibly involving dietary content. These ideas include the inflammation-induced activation of the kynurenine pathway and its role in feeding and metabolism by activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and by modulating synaptic transmission in the brain. Evidence for a role of the kynurenine pathway in carcinogenesis then provides a potentially major link between obesity and cancer. A second new hypothesis is based on evidence that serine proteases can deplete cells of the tumour suppressors Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and neogenin. These enzymes include mammalian chymotryptic proteases released by pro-inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages. Blood levels of chymotrypsin itself increase in parallel with food intake. The mechanistically similar bacterial enzyme subtilisin is widespread in the environment, animal probiotics, meat processing and cleaning products. Simple public health schemes in these areas, with selective serine protease inhibitors and AHR antagonists and could prevent a range of intestinal and other cancers.

Pubmed
Journal: Dalton transactions (Cambridge, England : 2003)
September/23/2018
Abstract

The platinum-based drugs cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are regularly prescribed in the treatment of cancer and while they are effective, their use is limited by their severe, dose-limiting side effects (also referred to as adverse effects/events). In total, a cancer patient can experience any combination of around 40 specific side effects. The dose-limiting side effect for cisplatin is nephrotoxicity, for carboplatin it is myelosuppression, and for oxaliplatin it is neurotoxicity. Other common side effects include anaphylaxis, cytopenias (including leukopenia and neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anaemia), hepatotoxicity, ototoxicity, cardiotoxicity, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, mucositis, stomatitis, pain, alopecia, anorexia, cachexia, and asthenia. The side effects may require patients to be prescribed dose reductions in their platinum drugs of between 25 and 100%. Furthermore, patients require extensive monitoring of their biochemistries, kidney and liver function, and depending on the drug, hearing tests. Finally, patients are commonly co-prescribed additional non-chemotherapy based drugs to treat the side effects which can include antiemetics, antibiotics and myeloid growth factors, mannitol, propafenone, saline hyperhydration, magnesium supplements, monoclonal antibody cytokine blockers, and antioxidants.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of cancer research and clinical oncology
June/11/2018
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

National Cancer Control Plans (NCCPs) often describe structural requirements for high quality cancer care. During the fourth European Roundtable Meeting (ERTM) participants shared learnings from their own national setting to formulate best practice in optimizing communication strategies between parties involved in clinical cancer registries, cancer centers and guideline groups.

RESULTS

A decentralized model of data collection close to the patient and caregiver enhances timely completion and the quality of the data captured. Nevertheless, central coordination is necessary to define datasets, indicators, standard settings, education, training and quality control to maintain standards across the network. In particular, interaction of parties in cancer care network has to be established and maintained on a regular basis.

CONCLUSIONS

After establishing the structural requirements of cancer care networks, communication between the different components and parties is required to analyze outcome data, provide regular reporting to all and develop strategies for continuous improvement of quality across the network.

Pubmed
Journal: International journal of molecular sciences
September/9/2018
Abstract

Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that triggers the expression of inflammatory molecules, including other cytokines and cell adhesion molecules. TNFα induces the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). VCAM-1 was originally identified as a cell adhesion molecule that helps regulate inflammation-associated vascular adhesion and the transendothelial migration of leukocytes, such as macrophages and T cells. Recent evidence suggests that VCAM-1 is closely associated with the progression of various immunological disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, transplant rejection, and cancer. This review covers the role and relevance of VCAM-1 in inflammation, and also highlights the emerging potential of VCAM-1 as a novel therapeutic target in immunological disorders and cancer.

Pubmed
Journal: Computational biology and chemistry
August/28/2018
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Radiotherapy (RT) is a common approach that accounts for nearly 50% of cancer patient treatment and has the potential for long-term tumor control. Recently, we published a research article on gene expression profiling of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) that were exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Single-dose irradiation of tumors could initiate differentially expressed genes in TAM as a time series from irradiated tumors that are associated with the immune response. It is also well known that human cancers are associated with microRNA (miRNA) alterations that are involved in cancer progression. However, the role of miRNA on TAM after exposure to irradiation remains unclear.

RESULTS

In this study, miRNA expression profiles from microarrays were used to identify the key miRNAs and correlating pathways involved in the role of TAMs in tumor progression and recurrence after RT. Using a mouse tumor model, we identified miRNA pattern changes over time in response to irradiation. Based on our results, we hypothesize that miRNA expression in the irradiated tumor may be used as a distinguishing marker to indicate the best time for therapeutic intervention to prevent tumor recurrence after RT.

CONCLUSIONS

We established a murine model irradiated with a single dose of 25 Gy that could initiate temporal changes in the expression of miRNAs associated with cell proliferation and the immune response, as evidenced by macrophages directly extracted from irradiated tumors after two weeks of IR. Statistical analyses were conducted by comparing the miRNA expression in macrophages from non-irradiated versus irradiated tumors. Thus, our study could lead to a better understanding of the function of miRNA expressions, which changed temporally in an irradiated tumor microenvironment.

Pubmed
Journal: The Journal of invasive cardiology
September/23/2018
Abstract

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now the treatment of choice for high-surgical risk patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis. Little is known regarding the outcome of TAVR in patients with previous malignancy.

We investigated 477 patients who underwent TAVR in a tertiary medical center. Subjects were divided into two groups according to malignancy status: no history of malignancy (n = 386) and positive history of malignancy (n = 91).

Mean age of the study population was 81 ± 7 years, and 52% were men. No major differences in baseline characteristics were found between groups. All-cause mortality was 24% for both malignancy and non-malignancy groups at a mean follow-up of 851 ± 629 days. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated no difference in all-cause mortality between groups. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that malignancy status did not affect prognosis regarding overall mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-1.4; P=.46). However, cancer therapy administered within 12-months of TAVR was significantly associated with increased total mortality among patients undergoing TAVR (HR, 4.38; 95% CI, 1.14-16.77; P=.03).

Malignancy is a common comorbidity among TAVR candidates. Mere history of malignancy among elderly patients does not adversely affect short-term or long-term outcomes after TAVR; however, history of recent (<1 year) cancer-related treatment increases the risk for long-term mortality after TAVR. Decisions regarding TAVR among oncological patients should be individualized according to their malignancy status and anticipated life expectancy.

Pubmed
Journal: Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
July/25/2017
Abstract

Oncogenic viruses are responsible for about 15% human cancers. This article explores the promise and challenges of viral proteomics in the study of the oncogenic human DNA viruses, HPV, McPyV, EBV and KSHV. These viruses have coevolved with their hosts and cause persistent infections. Each virus encodes oncoproteins that manipulate key cellular pathways to promote viral replication and evade the host immune response. Viral proteomics can identify cellular pathways perturbed by viral infection, identify cellular proteins that are crucial for viral persistence and oncogenesis, and identify important diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

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