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Pubmed
Journal: Human reproduction (Oxford, England)
December/20/2004
Abstract

Despite reasonable achievements in different animal species, the debate about many technical aspects of ovarian tissue banking is continuing. Human ovarian tissue banks are increasingly established around the world without a clear plan about how to make the best use of such tissue. One of the important challenges facing this growing technology is to determine the ideal method for the use of this cryopreserved ovarian tissue. It is not uncommon in medicine to introduce a technology without a clear understanding of the consequences. If it is decided that ovarian tissue is to be autotransplanted, what is the most suitable place? Which technique should be implemented? As a part of the ongoing debate on ovarian tissue banking in cancer patients, this paper supports the notion that cryopreservation of an intact ovary with its vascular pedicle may be a viable alternative to the currently available techniques. Research in the development of technology to cryopreserve whole organs as well surgical techniques for the auto-transplantation of an ovary with its vascular pedicle should be encouraged.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md. : 1997)
November/21/2004
Abstract

We present a novel vascular tumor therapy approach based on lysing endothelial cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Retargeting of CTLs is achieved by a recombinant bispecific antibody molecule (bispecific single-chain diabody) directed against human endoglin (CD105, EDG) and the T-cell coreceptor CD3 (scDb EDGCD3). Bacterially expressed scDb EDGCD3 was able to bind to endoglin-expressing endothelial cells as well as CD3-expressing T lymphocytes. The single-chain diabody mediated killing of endothelial cells (HUVEC, HMEC) by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes at picomolar concentrations, and cells not expressing endoglin were not affected. Because endoglin is up-regulated in the vasculature of many solid tumors, this antibody molecule should be capable of lysing tumor endothelial cells and thus destroying the vascular bed of the tumor.

Pubmed
Journal: Nature
October/18/2015
Pubmed
Journal: Drug metabolism and drug interactions
March/9/2014
Abstract

BACKGROUND

The discovery of cisplatin's antitumor activity led to a great interest in the potential application of coordination compounds as chemotherapeutic agents. It is essential to identify new compounds that selectively inhibit tumor proliferation, evading secondary effects and resistance associated with chemotherapeutics.

METHODS

The in vitro antiproliferative potential of an organotin(IV) compound was evaluated using colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma, mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell lines, and human fibroblasts. Tumor cell death was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry for the Sn(IV) compound and also for a Co(II) compound bearing 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione as ligand. Comparative proteomic analysis for both compounds was assessed in the colorectal cancer cell line.

RESULTS

The Sn(IV) compound presented a high cytotoxic effect in colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (IC50 of 0.238 ± 0.011 μM, 0.199 ± 0.003 μM, respectively), and a lower cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts. Both compounds induced cell apoptosis and promoted the overexpression of oxidative stress-related enzyme superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SODC). The Co(II) compound induced a decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (translationally-controlled tumor protein and endoplasmin), and the Sn(IV) compound decreased expression of proteins involved in microtubule stabilization, TCTP, and cofilin-1.

CONCLUSIONS

Our data reveals a high in vitro antiproliferative potential against cancer cell lines and a moderate selectivity promoted by the Sn(IV) compound. Proteomic analysis of Sn(IV) and Co(II) compounds in the colorectal cancer cell line allowed an insight to their mechanisms of action, particularly by affecting the expression of proteins typically deregulated in cancer, and also suggesting a promising therapeutic potential for both compounds.

Pubmed
Journal: Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))
February/6/2014
Pubmed
Journal: Cancer
May/22/2017
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Frailty has been suggested as a construct for oncologists to consider in treating older cancer patients. Therefore, the authors assessed the potential of creating a deficit-accumulation frailty index (DAFI) from a largely self-administered comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA).

METHODS

Five hundred patients aged ≥65 years underwent a CGA before receiving chemotherapy. A DAFI was constructed, resulting in a 51-item scale, and cutoff values were examined for patients in the robust/nonfrail (cutoff value, 0.0 < 0.2), prefrail (cutoff value, 0.2 < 0.35), and frail (cutoff value, ≥ 0.35) groups.

RESULTS

Two hundred and fifty patients (50%) were nonfrail, 197 (39%) were prefrail, and 52 (11%) were frail. Older patients (aged ≥ 80 years) and those who had lower education, were living alone, and had higher stage disease were associated with prefrail/frail status. Prefrail/frail patients were more likely to have grade ≥3 toxicity but not to have a dose delay or reduction, and they were more likely to discontinue drug and be hospitalized. The association with grade ≥3 toxicity was attenuated by controlling for a toxicity risk calculator, but the other outcomes were not.

CONCLUSIONS

A deficit-accumulation frailty index can be constructed from a CGA in older patients with cancer and can indicate the frailty status of the population. The frailty status so determined is associated both with outcomes likely because of chemotherapy toxicity and with those likely because of age-related physiologic and functional deficits and thus can be useful in the overall assessment of the patient. Cancer 2016;122:3865-3872. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

Pubmed
Journal: Future oncology (London, England)
October/18/2016
Abstract

BACKGROUND

We performed a meta-analysis of the risk of endocrine adverse events associated with immune check point inhibitors.

METHODS

Eligible studies included randomized trials of cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitors; describing events of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypophysitis and adrenal insufficiency.

RESULTS

A total of ten clinical trials were eligible for the meta-analysis. The relative risk of all-grade hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypophyisitis and adrenal insufficiency were 8.26 (95% CI: 4.67-14.62; p < 0.00001), 5.48 (95% CI: 1.33-22.53; p = 0.02); 22.03 (95% CI: 8.52-56.94; p < 0.00001), 3.87 (95% CI: 1.12-13.41; p = 0.03), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Our meta-analysis has demonstrated that the use of immune check point inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypophysitis and adrenal insufficiency compared with control.

Pubmed
Journal: Cancer treatment reviews
January/29/2017
Abstract

The study of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has shown that tumors are driven by a subpopulation of self-renewing CSCs that retain the capacity to engender the various differentiated cell populations that form tumors. The characterization of CSCs has indicated that CSCs are remarkably resistant to conventional radio- and chemo-therapy. Clinically, the remaining populations of CSC are responsible for metastasis and recurrence in patients with cancer, which can lead to the disease becoming chronic and incurable. Therefore, the elimination of CSCs is an important goal of cancer treatments. Furthermore, CSCs are subject to strong regulation by the surrounding microenvironment, which also impacts tumor responses. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which pathways that are defective in CSCs influence ultimately therapeutic and clinical outcomes.

Pubmed
Journal: The Analyst
January/3/2017
Abstract

Cancer is currently one of the top non-communicable human diseases, and continual research and developmental efforts are being made to better understand and manage this disease. More recently, with the improved understanding in cancer biology as well as the advancements made in microtechnology and rapid prototyping, microfluidics is increasingly being explored and even validated for use in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. With inherent advantages such as small sample volume, high sensitivity and fast processing time, microfluidics is well-positioned to serve as a promising platform for applications in oncology. In this review, we look at the recent advances in the use of microfluidics, from basic research such as understanding cancer cell phenotypes as well as metastatic behaviors to applications such as the detection, diagnosis, prognosis and drug screening. We then conclude with a future outlook on this promising technology.

Pubmed
Journal: Clinical reviews in allergy & immunology
February/1/2017
Abstract

The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a heterogeneous group of autoimmune diseases (collectively known as myositis) affecting the skeletal muscles as well as other organ systems such as skin, lungs, and joints. The primary forms of myositis include polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (PM), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). Patients with these diseases experience progressive proximal muscle weakness, have characteristic muscle biopsy findings, and produce autoantibodies that are associated with unique clinical features. One distinguishing feature of these patients is that they are also known to have an increased risk of cancer. Since the first description of the association in 1916, it has been extensively reported in the medical literature. However, there have been significant variations between the different studies with regard to the degree of cancer risk in patients with IIM. These discrepancies can, in part, be attributed to differences in the definition of malignancy-associated myositis used in different studies. In recent years, significant advances have been made in defining specific features of IIM that are associated with the development of malignancy. One of these has been myositis-specific antibodies (MSAs), which are linked to distinct clinical phenotypes and categorize patients into groups with more homogeneous features. Indeed, patients with certain MSAs seem to be at particularly increased risk of malignancy. This review attempts a systematic evaluation of research regarding the association between malignancy and myositis.

Pubmed
Journal: Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Rontgengesellschaft ... [et al]
August/12/2009
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the structure quality (medical staff, linear accelerators, and patients) of radiotherapy units based on the clinical audits by the "Arztliche Stelle" (this institution is based on federal German law) in Baden-Württemberg.

METHODS

External audits (performed by at least two radiation oncologists, one radiation physicist, and a member of the administration) of recently completed charts by designated reviewers using appropriate checklists developed by the federal task group ("Arztliche Stelle") were used.

RESULTS

In the interval from 2005 to 2007, 60 linear accelerators in 24 radiotherapy units served a population of approximately 10.7 million inhabitants (178,000 inhabitants/linear accelerator). 28,210 people with malignant tumors were treated in these units in 2007. These patients were served by 127 radiation oncologists, 83 radiation physicists, and 235 technologists. The ratio of patients irradiated annually to staff would become 222 (range 85-400) for a radiation oncologist, 339 for a radiation physicist (range 170-538), and 120 for a technologist (range 48-189). In five of seven departments (71%), new staff was employed following the recommendations of the auditors.

CONCLUSIONS

Clinical audits by the "Arztliche Stelle" are highly effective to evaluate the structure quality of radiotherapy units. Based on these audits realistic data for staff requirements were gained. Making use of these data, guidelines for average minimum personnel necessary for good patient care were calculated. Personnel requirements may vary related to specific needs (teaching, research) of the treatment program and should be accounted for when discussing with the administration. The recommendations of the auditors of the "Arztliche Stelle" resulted in the new employment of additional staff.

Pubmed
Journal: Critical reviews in oncology/hematology
August/12/2009
Abstract

Aging is associated with physiological changes and comorbid illnesses, which may affect an individual's tolerance to radiation. There is the belief that a relationship exists between age and radiation toxicity and therefore non-curative schemes are offered to older patients. Preclinical studies show that normal tissue radiation-induced toxicity differs little with age. In the clinical setting, retrospective and some prospective studies have reported that elderly patients treated with radical radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy, who do not have comorbidities and retain a good performance status, show a benefit in treatment outcomes. However, an increase in acute effects or a lowered functional tolerance has also been reported. To select candidates for radical treatments, a specific geriatric assessment should be used to stratify elderly patients as a function of the physiological status. Only specifically designed prospective studies can define the role of radiation treatment in elderly patients with different physiological status.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of biomolecular NMR
January/30/2005
Pubmed
Journal: Nature chemical biology
August/8/2006
Pubmed
Journal: FEBS letters
June/11/2009
Abstract

Recent advances in cancer biology have subsequently led to the development of new molecularly targeted anti-cancer agents that can effectively hit cancer-related proteins and pathways. Despite better insight into genomic aberrations and diversity of cancer phenotypes, it is apparent that proteomics too deserves attention in cancer research. Currently, a wide range of proteomic technologies are being used in quest for new cancer biomarkers with effective use. These, together with newer technologies such as multiplex assays could significantly contribute to the discovery and development of selective and specific cancer biomarkers with diagnostic or prognostic values for monitoring the disease state. This review attempts to illustrate recent advances in the field of cancer biomarkers and multifaceted approaches undertaken in combating cancer.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics
October/23/2016
Abstract

Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is emerging as an important new therapeutic drug target for the treatment of cancer characterized by pathological immune suppression. IDO catalyzes the rate-limiting step of tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway. Reduction in local tryptophan concentration and the production of immunomodulatory tryptophan metabolites contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of IDO. Presence of IDO on dentritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes leading to the activation of T cells toward forming immunosuppressive microenvironment for the survival of tumor cells has confirmed the importance of IDO as a promising novel anticancer immunotherapy drug target. On the other hand, Withaferin A (WA) - active constituent of Withania Somnifera ayurvedic herb has shown to be having a wide range of targeted anticancer properties. In the present study conducted here is an attempt to explore the potential of WA in attenuating IDO for immunotherapeutic tumor arresting activity and to elucidate the underlying mode of action in a computational approach. Our docking and molecular dynamic simulation results predict high binding affinity of the ligand to the receptor with up to -11.51 kcal/mol of energy and 3.63 nM of IC50 value. Further, de novo molecular dynamic simulations predicted stable ligand interactions with critically important residues SER167; ARG231; LYS377, and heme moiety involved in IDO's activity. Conclusively, our results strongly suggest WA as a valuable small ligand molecule with strong binding affinity toward IDO.

Pubmed
Journal: Advances in cancer research
September/13/2016
Abstract

As an endoplasmic reticulum heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) paralog, GRP94 (glucose-regulated protein 94)/gp96 (hereafter referred to as GRP94) has been shown to be an essential master chaperone for multiple receptors including Toll-like receptors, Wnt coreceptors, and integrins. Clinically, expression of GRP94 correlates with advanced stage and poor survival in a variety of cancers. Recent preclinical studies have also revealed that GRP94 expression is closely linked to cancer growth and metastasis in melanoma, ovarian cancer, multiple myeloma, lung cancer, and inflammation-associated colon cancer. Thus, GRP94 is an attractive therapeutic target in a number of malignancies. The chaperone function of GRP94 depends on its ATPase domain, which is structurally distinct from HSP90, allowing design of highly selective GRP94-targeted inhibitors. In this chapter, we discuss the biology and structure-function relationship of GRP94. We also summarize the immunological roles of GRP94 based on the studies documented over the last two decades, as these pertain to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Finally, the structure-based rationale for the design of selective small-molecule inhibitors of GRP94 and their potential application in the treatment of cancer are highlighted.

Pubmed
Journal: Actas dermo-sifiliograficas
December/12/2016
Abstract

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder resulting from a complex network of cytokines and chemokines produced by various immune cell types and tissue cells. Emerging evidence suggests a central role of IL-17 and IL-23/T17 axis in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, giving a rationale for using IL-17-blocking agents as therapeutics. Three agents targeting IL-17 signaling are being studied in Phase III clinical trials: secukinumab and ixekizumab (IL-17 neutralizing agents), and brodalumab (IL-17 receptor antagonist). Preliminary results are highly promising for all anti-IL17 agents, creating fair expectations on this class of agents as the new effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of psoriasis.

Pubmed
Journal: Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics
April/12/2006
Abstract

Motivated by experimental observations, we develop a mathematical model of chemotactically directed tumor growth. We present an analytical study of the model as well as a numerical one. The mathematical analysis shows that: (i) tumor cell proliferation by itself cannot generate the invasive branching behavior observed experimentally, (ii) heterotype chemotaxis provides an instability mechanism that leads to the onset of tumor invasion, and (iii) homotype chemotaxis does not provide such an instability mechanism but enhances the mean speed of the tumor surface. The numerical results not only support the assumptions needed to perform the mathematical analysis but they also provide evidence of (i), (ii), and (iii). Finally, both the analytical study and the numerical work agree with the experimental phenomena.

Pubmed
Journal: EXS
February/15/2006
Abstract

Morphological abnormalities of both the nuclei and the cell bodies of tumour cells were described by Müller in the late 1830s. Abnormalities of mitoses and chromosomes in tumour cells were described in the late 1880s. Von Hansemann, in the 1890s, suggested that tumour cells develop from normal cells because of a tendency to mal-distribution and other changes of chromosomes occurring during mitosis. In the first decades of the 20th century, Mendelian genetics and "gene mapping" of chromosomes were established, and the dominant or recessive bases of the familial predispositions to certain tumour types were recognised. In the same period, the carcinogenic effects of ionising radiations, of certain chemicals and of particular viruses were described. A well-developed "somatic gene-mutational theory" of tumours was postulated by Bauer in 1928. In support of this, in the next three decades, many environmental agents were found to cause mitotic and chromosomal abnormalities in normal cells as well as mutations in germ-line cells of experimental animals. Nevertheless, mitotic, chromosomal, and other mutational theories were not popular explanations of tumour pathogenesis in the first half of the 20th century. Only in the 1960s did somatic mutational mechanisms come to dominate theories of tumour formation, especially as a result of the discoveries of the reactivity of carcinogens with DNA, and that the mutation responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum causes loss of function of a gene involved in the repair of DNA after damage by ultraviolet light (Cleaver in 1968). To explain the complexity of tumourous phenomena, "multi-hit" models gained popularity over "single-hit" models of somatic mutation, and "epigenetic" mechanisms of gene regulation began to be studied in tumour cells. More recently, the documentation of much larger-than-expected numbers of genomic events in tumour cells (by Stoler and co-workers, in 1999) has raised the issue of somatic genetic instability in tumour cells, a field which was pioneered in the 1970s mainly by Loeb. Here these discoveries are traced, beginning with "nuclear instability" though mitotic-and-chromosomal theories, single somatic mutation theories, "multi-hit" somatic theories, "somatic, non-chromosomal, genetic instability" and epigenetic mechanisms in tumour cells as a background to the chapters which follow.

Pubmed
Journal: Transfusion
May/3/1999
Abstract

BACKGROUND

The gel agglutination assay has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an alternative to the tube assay for the detection of red cell antibodies. It has also been approved recently by the Food and Drug Administration for ABO blood grouping and D typing.

METHODS

Tube and gel agglutination assays were compared for ABO grouping and D typing of 100 donor and 100 patient specimens. ABO grouping of 14 specimens of known ABO groups and D typing of 10 specimens with weak D were also compared. When antigen typing or isohemagglutinin results differed, gel testing was repeated by the use of modified incubation times, reagent or specimen volumes, and red cell concentrations.

RESULTS

ABO grouping and D typing in all patient and donor specimens concurred. B isohemagglutinins were not detected in seven group A specimens. Six of seven discrepancies were resolved when gel tests were incubated at room temperature with increased serum or plasma volume. Weak D was detected in all 10 specimens tested by both assays. When weak A and/or B were tested with monoclonal antibody reagents, the correct phenotypes were identified in 9 specimens by gel assay and in 10 by tube assay. Using human antisera, 6 specimens were correctly phenotyped by gel assay and 7 by tube assay.

CONCLUSIONS

The gel assay performed as well as the tube assay in detection of A, B, and D, but the tube assay was slightly better at detecting B isohemagglutinins. The gel assay can be used in place of the tube assay for ABO blood grouping and D typing.

Pubmed
Journal: Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS
May/18/1999
Abstract

HLA-G is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule selectively expressed on cytotrophoblasts at the fetal-maternal interface, where it plays a role in materno-fetal tolerance. In contrast to classical HLA-A, -B and -C class I molecules, HLA-G is characterized by (i) a tissue-restricted distribution, (ii) a limited polymorphism and (iii) a transcription of spliced messenger RNAs encoding for at least four membrane-bound and two soluble HLA-G isoforms. Extensive studies over the past few years have identified HLA-G as a molecule involved in immune tolerance. In this review, attempts were made to summarize the current state of knowledge of the effects of HLA-G on both natural killer and T cell functions and their implications in materno-fetal tolerance and tumor immunosurveillance.

Pubmed
Journal: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990)
November/4/1999
Abstract

Autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) grafts can be contaminated with tumour cells that potentially give rise to relapse following myeloablative therapy and PBPC transplantation. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors produced by a new adenovirus-free technique are a gene delivery system which may be applicable for tumour cell purging. To test for the host range of these vectors, solid tumours of clinical relevance and normal CD34+ PBPC were selected as target cells for an AAV-vector, encoding the green-fluorescent protein (GFP) as the indicator gene. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100: 79.94% +/- 14.36% (mean +/- SEM) of the connective tissue sarcoma cell line (HS-1) and 64.84% +/- 6.91% of the cervical carcinoma cell line cells (HeLa-RC) expressed GFP while the other cell lines tested (1 ovarian tumour, 1 germ cell tumour, 1 osteosarcoma, 2 small cell lung cancer) ranged between 2.82% and 11.94%. Optimising the transduction protocol by use of higher MOIs of up to 500 and by pretreatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, resulted in up to 95.97% and 94.10% green-fluorescent HS-1 and HeLa-RC cells, respectively. In contrast, only 1.39% +/- 0.51% of the normal haematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells expressed GFP at a MOI of 100. The differential infectivity between HS-1 and CD34+ cells was maintained after tumour cell spiking in leucapheresis products. Our observations suggest that AAV-based vectors may prove useful for purging of autologous PBPC grafts from solid tumour cells.

Pubmed
Journal: Drugs
June/14/1999
Abstract

Tumour markers can aid in areas such as diagnosis, surveillance of recurrence, staging and prognosis. This article focuses on 2 tumour markers, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). These tumour markers have been examined for their utility as prognostic indicators in 2 different manners. First, the marker level at diagnosis has been studied to determine if it is prognostic of outcome presumably because of its relation to tumour bulk or to the biological nature of the tumour. A more recent trend has been to investigate tumour marker decline. The finding of a delayed rate of decline suggests a poorer response of the malignancy to chemotherapy. The major focus of the article will be on marker decline of AFP and HCG as prognostic tools in peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumours (GCTs) and hepatic tumours (hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma). The articles reviewed here suggest that HCG and AFP can correlate with survival if examined in specific ways, and could potentially be used to tailor treatment for individual patients. One group of authors presents data on patients with GCTs suggesting that satisfactory marker regression is an independent prognostic factor for survival. In a study of hepatoblastoma, data demonstrate that both the magnitude and rate of decline are associated with survival. Marker decline studies in hepatocellular carcinoma do not exist and marker levels at diagnosis do not appear to have a role in potential therapeutic changes. However, data on fucosylated subtype of AFP, Lens culinaris agglutinin A reactive AFP, has shown prognostic significance in hepatocellular carcinoma. The data for CNS GCTs are limited and studies examining serial cerebrospinal fluid HCG/AFP are ongoing. In some diseases, issues relating to timing of marker sampling when examining marker decline need to be studied in greater detail. Hopefully, marker decline studies can be duplicated in the other diseases, to document a potential role in determining outcome. Further studies are needed to test the ability to alter therapy in attempts to improve survival while decreasing toxicity to patients.

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