Liver Neoplasms
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Pubmed
Journal: The American journal of pathology
September/16/1990
Abstract

DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissues from nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and six control patients was screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA with surface (S) and core (C) gene-specific primers by a modification of the polymerase chain reaction--southern blot technique (PCR-SB). PCR-SB results were correlated with histologic, immunohistochemical, and serologic findings. All cases with an established HBV etiology were positive by PCR-SB, as were three cases with negative immunohistochemistry and serology. Often there was selective amplification with one primer set and, in two cases, smaller than expected HBV amplification products suggesting internal deletions. The presence of a potent PCR inhibitor in nucleic acid preparations from tissue blocks that can be removed by Sephadex G-50 chromatography was confirmed. PCR-SB will be a powerful method for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with HBV infection and may provide new insights into viral hepatocarcinogenesis.

Pubmed
Journal: Journal of viral hepatitis
March/28/2016
Abstract

Hepatocyte clone size was measured in liver samples of 21 patients in various stages of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and from 21 to 76 years of age. Hepatocyte clones containing unique virus-cell DNA junctions formed by the integration of HBV DNA were detected using inverse nested PCR. The maximum hepatocyte clone size tended to increase with age, although there was considerable patient-to-patient variation in each age group. There was an upward trend in maximum clone size with increasing fibrosis, inflammatory activity and with seroconversion from HBV e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive to HBeAg-negative, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. Maximum hepatocyte clone size did not differ between patients with and without a coexisting hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, large hepatocyte clones containing integrated HBV DNA were detected during all stages of chronic HBV infection. Using laser microdissection, no significant difference in clone size was observed between foci of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive and HBsAg-negative hepatocytes, suggesting that expression of HBsAg is not a significant factor in clonal expansion. Laser microdissection also revealed that hepatocytes with normal-appearing histology make up a major fraction of the cells undergoing clonal expansion. Thus, preneoplasia does not appear to be a factor in the clonal expansion detected in our assays. Computer simulations suggest that the large hepatocyte clones are not produced by random hepatocyte turnover but have an as-yet-unknown selective advantage that drives increased clonal expansion in the HBV-infected liver.

Pubmed
Journal: Laboratory investigation; a journal of technical methods and pathology
August/9/1995
Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent studies have demonstrated that the plant-derived alkaloid camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative, 9-nitro-CPT (9NC), are cytotoxic in tumorigenic cells but cytostatic in nontumorigenic cells in vitro and in vivo. Also, CPT induces differentiation of human leukemia cells in vitro along specific lineages. In this study, we have investigated the effects of 9NC on nontumorigenic HepG2 cells derived from human hepatoblastoma. A newly discovered senescent cell-derived inhibitor (SDI1) plays a critical role in the cell cycle, so we evaluated the effect of 9NC on the expression of the SDI1 gene.

METHODS

The effects of 9NC on HepG2 cells were evaluated by monitoring DNA synthesis, morphologic and ultrastructural changes of cells, and perturbation in the cell cycle and by assessing the levels of p53 protein and SDI1 mRNA.

RESULTS

Treatment of HepG2 cells with 9NC results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content showed that 9NC-treated HepG2 cells are arrested in the G2-phase of the cell cycle. Light and electron microscopic examination revealed that 9NC at low concentrations induces morphologic and growth features that resemble properties highly differentiated or senescent cells, i.e., increased cell size and decreased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, as well as enlarged numbers of lysosomes, mitochondria, and lipid in the cytoplasm. No significant alteration in the p53 protein level was noted in 9NC-treated cells. In contrast to untreated, logarithmically grown HepG2 cells, 9NC-treated cells arrested at the G2-phase of the cell cycle and contained increased levels of SDI1 mRNA. Kinetic studies revealed gradual increases in SDI1 mRNA synthesis.

CONCLUSIONS

Induction of SDI1 mRNA by 9NC represents the first documentation that the SDI1 gene can be overexpressed in the G2-phase of the cell cycle and provides a valuable cell culture system to dissect the events controlling the G2 checkpoint. In addition, this finding corroborates the hypothesis that genes up-regulated in senescent cells can also be induced in tumor-derived immortalized cells.

Pubmed
Journal: Critical reviews in immunology
September/5/2013
Abstract

Scavenger receptors comprise a large family of structurally diverse proteins that are involved in many homeostatic functions. They recognize a wide range of ligands, from pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to endogenous, as well as modified host-derived molecules (DAMPs). The liver deals with blood micro-organisms and DAMPs released from injured organs, thus performing vital metabolic and clearance functions that require the uptake of nutrients and toxins. Many liver cell types, including hepatocytes and Kupffer cells, express scavenger receptors that play key roles in hepatitis C virus entry, lipid uptake, and macrophage activation, among others. Chronic liver disease causes high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatitis virus infection, alcohol abuse, and non-alcoholic fatty liver are the main etiologies associated with this disease. In this context, continuous inflammation as a result of liver damage leads to hepatic fibrosis, which frequently brings about cirrhosis and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we will summarize the role of scavenger receptors in the pathophysiology of chronic liver diseases. We will also emphasize their potential as biomarkers of advanced liver disease, including cirrhosis and cancer.

Pubmed
Journal: Magnetic resonance imaging
April/9/2008
Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in the degrees of contrast enhancement effects of small hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in patients with cirrhosis between helical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging and to determine the diagnostic value of MR imaging especially in assessing hypovascular HCCs detected as hypoattenuating nodules on late-phase CT.

METHODS

This study included 64 small HCCs (<3 cm in diameter) in 40 patients with chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis who underwent multiphasic (arterial, portal and late phases) contrast-enhanced dynamic helical CT and MR imaging. The contrast enhancement patterns of each lesion in the arterial and late phases were evaluated by two radiologists experienced in liver MR imaging and categorized as one of five grades (1=hypoattenuated/hypointense; 2=slightly hypoattenuated/hypointense; 3=isoattenuated/isointense; 4=slightly hyperattenuated/hyperintense; 5=hyperattenuated/hyperintense), compared with the surrounding liver parenchyma.

RESULTS

Forty-three (67%) of 64 lesions showed Grade 4 (n=24) or Grade 5 (n=19) enhancement on arterial-phase CT, while 51 (80%) of 64 lesions showed Grade 4 (n=20) or Grade 5 (n=31) enhancement on arterial-phase MR imaging, indicating hypervascular HCCs. The grading score of hypervascular HCCs on arterial-phase MR imaging (mean: 4.61) was significantly (P<.01) higher than that for hypervascular HCCs on arterial-phase CT (mean: 4.20), showing better detection of the hypervascularity (arterial enhancement) of the lesion on arterial-phase MR imaging. Regarding hypovascular HCCs, all (100%) of 21 hypovascular HCCs on CT showed Grade 1 (n=10) or Grade 2 (n=11) enhancement on late-phase CT, seen as hypoattenuation. In contrast, 8 (62%) of 13 hypovascular HCCs on MR imaging showed Grade 1 (n=1) or Grade 2 (n=7) enhancement on late-phase MR imaging, seen as hypointensity. Grading scores of hypovascular HCCs on late-phase images were significantly (P<.001) lower on CT than on MR imaging (mean score: 1.52 vs. 2.31), indicating better washout effects for hypovascular HCCs on late-phase CT.

CONCLUSIONS

The washout effects for small HCCs on late-phase MR imaging were inferior to those for small HCCs on late-phase CT. Especially, hypovascular HCCs demonstrated as hypoattenuating nodules on late-phase CT were often not seen on late-phase MR imaging, requiring careful evaluation of other sequences, including unenhanced T(1)-weighted and T(2)-weighted MR images.

Pubmed
Journal: Life sciences
June/4/2006
Abstract

Cell detachment from extracellular matrix is closely related to induction of apoptosis. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been shown to have antioxidant effect and to protect hypoxia-induced damage. We investigated whether EGCG reduced hypoxia-induced apoptosis and cell detachment in HepG2 cells. EGCG prevented cell death by hypoxia (0.5% O2) in a dose-dependent manner (hypoxic cell viability, 54.67%). RT-PCR and caspase3 activity assay showed that the hypoxia-induced cell death was caused by apoptosis increasing mRNA level of BAX, CASP3, and caspase3 activity. EGCG reduced increase of these mRNA and caspase3 activity. Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that EGCG increased cell adhesion proteins including E-cadherin (CDH1), tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 1 (TACSTD1), and protein tyrosine kinase 2 (PTK2) decreased by hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, and EGCG contributed to the HepG2 cell survival by attenuating the apoptosis.

Pubmed
Journal: Molecular carcinogenesis
May/11/2005
Abstract

The utility of liver H-ras codon 61 CAA to AAA mutant fraction as a biomarker of liver tumor development was investigated using neonatal male mice treated with 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP). Treatment with 0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 mumol 4-ABP produced dose-dependent increases in liver DNA adducts in B6C3F(1) and C57BL/6N mice. Eight months after treatment with 0.3 mumol 4-ABP or the DMSO vehicle, H-ras codon 61 CAA to AAA mutant fraction was measured in liver DNA samples (n = 12) by allele-specific competitive blocker-polymerase chain reaction (ACB-PCR). A significant increase in average mutant fraction was found in DNA of 4-ABP-treated mice, with an increase from 1.3 x 10(-5) (control) to 44.9 x 10(-5) (treated) in B6C3F(1) mice and from 1.4 x 10(-5) to 7.0 x 10(-5) in C57BL/6N mice. Compared with C57BL/6N mutant fractions, B6C3F(1) mutant fractions were more variable and included some particularly high mutant fractions, consistent with the more rapid development of liver foci expected in B6C3F(1) mouse liver. Twelve months after treatment, liver tumors developed in 79.2% of 4-ABP-treated and 22.2% of control B6C3F(1) mice; thus measurement of H-ras mutant fraction correlated with subsequent tumor development. This study demonstrates that ACB-PCR can directly measure background levels of somatic oncogene mutation and detect a carcinogen-induced increase in such mutation.

Pubmed
Journal: Acta chirurgica Belgica
February/28/2000
Abstract

Primary neuroendocrine neoplasms of the liver are extremely rare: about 30 cases only have been described in the literature. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with a ten-year evolution. According to the previously reported cases, primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the liver is usually multicentric, often mimicking liver metastases. The demonstration of the hepatic origin of a neuroendocrine carcinoma is often arduous. A careful surgical exploration and a prolonged follow-up are mandatory. The treatment of choice is surgical resection when possible. For progressive and unresectable disease, hepatic arterial chemoembolization may be considered. However, the prognosis of liver neuroendocrine tumours is much more favorable than that of hepatocellular carcinoma and progression has to be demonstrated before instauration of potentially harmful therapies.

Pubmed
Journal: Human pathology
September/12/1995
Abstract

We examined 41 consecutive cirrhotic liver explants from French patients for the presence of nodules of adenomatous hyperplasia (AH) and then analyzed these lesions, together with underlying cirrhosis (C) and associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for various histological parameters, cellular density, and proliferative activity. Thirty-five AHs were identified in 10 livers (prevalence, 24%); seven of 10 were HCV positive. Hepatocellular carcinoma was more frequent in patients with AH than in patients without. The AHs consisted of 17 ordinary (OAH) and 18 atypical (AAH) adenomatous hyperplasia lesions. There was a malignant focus in five of the 18 AAHs. Wide areas of large liver cell dysplasia were frequent in OAH but never found in AAH. Obvious steatosis was frequent in HCC but exceptional in AAH and absent in OAH. There was a significant increase in cellular density in AAH and HCC as compared with C and OAH. Proliferative cell nuclear antigen immunostaining similarly showed an increase in proliferation from OAH or C to AAH and HCC. These data suggest that, in Europe as in Japan, one pathway of hepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process in which AAH should be considered as a premalignant lesion very close to grade I HCC, while OAH seems to correspond to a regenerative nodule with limited proliferative ability.

Pubmed
Journal: Abdominal imaging
September/12/2005
Abstract

BACKGROUND

We investigated the effect of iodinated contrast medium concentration on increased neoplastic lesion enhancement and its direct relation to diagnostic efficacy in biphasic spiral computed tomography for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma.

METHODS

A pilot, single-center, randomized, double-blind, crossover, comparative study was performed and included 22 participants. Each patient underwent two separate biphasic contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomographic examinations. Scans were performed with iomeprol containing 400 (iomeprol 400) or 300 (iomeprol 300) mg of iodine per milliliter (Iomeron, Bracco Imaging SpA, Milan, Italy) with a 2- to 12-day window scan; patients were given an equal total dose of 45 g of iodine at a fixed injection rate of 4 mL/s. Comparison included assessment of quantitative and qualitative parameters.

RESULTS

Lesion density and lesion-to-liver contrast increased more markedly with the higher concentration of contrast medium during the arterial phase (p = 0.0016 and 0.0005, respectively). There was no significant difference in any parameter between the two concentrations during the portal phase. Number of lesions detected during the arterial phase increased from 37 with iomeprol 300 to 42 with iomeprol 400; in the portal phase, the respective numbers were 34 and 36.

CONCLUSIONS

Even though a small number of patients was examined, our study suggests that, in patients with cirrhosis, an increased concentration of iodine improves liver-to-lesion contrast and may improve the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma.

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