Date
All
Search in:AllTitleAbstractAuthor name
Publications
(181)
Patents
Grants
Pathways
Clinical trials
Publication
Journal: Neurocase
September/26/2021
Abstract
This case study describes the coexistence of Capgras and Fregoli-type delusions in a 51-year-old woman. The patient reported that her children were kidnapped and replaced with doubles. She claims that several customers at her shop are her real children. Neuropsychological assessment revealed severe defects in social cognition and an increased number of perseveration responses in the self-directed signaling task. We propose that the latter finding is a measure of the familiarity phenomenon and may be associated with hypofunction in the left retrosplenial region. SPECT-CT confirmed a pattern of hypoperfusion in the retrosplenial, posterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortex.
Keywords: capgras syndrome; cognition; familiarity; fregoli syndrome; word.
Related with
Publication
Journal: Case Reports in Neurology
June/27/2021
Abstract
Capgras syndrome is a condition characterized by the belief that a relative has been replaced by an almost identical imposter. The disorder has been reported in several neurological diseases. We describe the uncommon case of a transient Capgras syndrome manifesting as focal temporal seizures in a woman with a right frontal meningioma. Our patient represents an exceptional case of Capgras syndrome for several reasons, namely, the association with meningioma, very rarely reported before, the transient manifestation of symptoms, and, most importantly, the epileptic etiology of reduplicative paramnesias. Lastly, our report also confirms the importance of frontal and right hemisphere dysfunction in generating Capgras syndrome-like delusions.
Keywords: Capgras syndrome; Epilepsy; Meningioma; Seizure.
Publication
Journal: CNS Spectrums
June/14/2021
Abstract
Introduction: The delusion of being a living animate non-animal object has not heretofore been reported.
Methods: A 21-year-old right-handed cisgender female, two months prior to presentation, noted stiffness and difficulty with ambulation. One-month prior to admission, she experienced recurrent depression with myriad vegetative and nonvegetative symptoms of depression. On admission her chief complaint was I am a tree, standing motionless and minimally responding to query. After treatment with quetiapine, mirtazapine and hydroxyzine for a one-week period, her perception of being a tree fully resolved.
Results: Abnormalities in Mental Status Examination: Anxious mood repeatedly stating, I am a tree. Standing still for long periods of time, refusing blood pressure to be obtained and expressing fear of constricting flow. Neuropsychiatric Testing: Beck Depression Inventory Type II: 33 (severe depression).
Discussion: The rapid response to risperidone is consistent with Cotard's syndrome, which has been noted to respond rapidly to neuroleptics (Sharma, 2014). However, in Cotard's syndrome, replacement by a living non-animal object has not hitherto been reported. Body infestation with animate objects, as in Ekbom syndrome, only includes animals not botanicals (Chaudhary, 2019). This could be viewed as Reverse Inanimate Capgras Syndrome: instead of an imposter replacing a close friend, who then is inserted into the sufferer; a tree has replaced the sufferer. Peradventure, this may fit into the construct of Intermetamorphosis, a misidentification syndrome associated with the belief that individuals have transformed into other persons (Jariwala, 2017). Botanical Intermetamorphosis, the belief by the sufferer that the other individual is transformed from a person into a plant has not been described. Reverse Intermetamorphosis is the projection of an external individual into the person suffering or a syndrome of altered physical and psychological identities of the self (Silva, 1990). However, in this situation, the objects are all human or animate animals not botanicals. In Fregoli syndrome, there is an altered physical identity of others. In Reverse Fregoli syndrome, the sufferer assumes the physical but not the psychological identity of the stranger (Silva, 1990). But in this instance, the stranger is human as opposed to a plant life form. In the current case there is only altered physical identity (into a tree) not psychological identity. The current case may also be interpreted as a Botanical Variant of Interparietal Syndrome. In this condition, parts of the body are perceived to be lifeless, due to lesions of the inferior parietal lobe including supramarginalis gyrus, angular gyrus and the basalis parietalis area (Angyal, 1935). Investigation for those whom have Intermetamorphosis, Fregoli syndrome, Capgras syndrome, Interparietal syndrome, and Cotard's syndrome for the presence of delusions involving plant life is warranted.
Publication
Journal: Neurocase
April/14/2021
Abstract
Capgras syndrome (CS) is a delusional misidentification syndrome that is encountered in various pathologies. Here, we report the case of an 83-year-old woman affected by dementia with Lewy bodies who presented a CS during the disease. The neuropsychological assessment showed executive and face processing deficits. In this case, CS was characterized, in the beginning, by the duplication of a relative and then by its multiplication. To our knowledge, the description of the evolution of a CS in the course of a neurodegenerative disease is rare and we discuss this multiplication phenomenon in light of existing models of delusions.
Keywords: Capgras syndrome; delusional misidentification; dementia with Lewy bodies; multiplication phenomenon; neurodegenerative disease.
Publication
Journal: Annals of General Psychiatry
March/20/2021
Abstract
Background: Capgras delusion is one of the delusional misidentification syndromes characterized by the belief by the patient that the close person is replaced by an imposter who looks physically the same. It rarely occurs in Postpartum Psychosis. An intriguing phenomenon with ongoing debates, particularly about its feature and prevalence, its course, occurrence, and phenomenon in the postpartum period are poorly understood.
Case presentation: A 26-year-old Nepalese woman presented to the emergency for abnormal behavior on her 9th postpartum day. Capgras delusion was observed for 2 days during her hospital stay. Other psychotic symptoms appeared progressively and were treated as a case of Postpartum Psychosis.
Conclusion: This case describes the temporal sequence of various psychopathologies during Postpartum Psychosis including Capgras delusion. We attempt to explain the occurrence of Capgras delusion in Postpartum Psychosis.
Keywords: Capgras; Delusional misidentification syndrome; Phenomenon; Postpartum.
Publication
Journal: Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology
September/17/2020
Abstract
Despite being an infrequent crime, parental homicide has been associated with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in adult perpetrators and a history of child abuse and family violence in adolescent perpetrators. Among severe psychiatric disorders there is initial evidence that delusional misidentification might also play a role in parricide. Parricides are often committed with undue violence and may result in overkill. The authors present the case of an adult male affected by schizoaffective disorder and Capgras syndrome who committed patricide. Forensic pathologists classify such cases as overkill by multiple fatal means comprising stabbing, blunt trauma and choking. Accurate crime scene investigations coupled with psychiatric examinations of perpetrator allow reconstruction of the murder stages. This overkill case is discussed in the context of a broad review of the literature.
Keywords: Autopsy; Capgras syndrome; Homicidal asphyxia; Overkill; Patricide.
Publication
Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
June/28/2020
Publication
Journal: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
June/17/2020
Abstract
Although Alzheimer's disease presents homogeneous histopathology, it causes several clinical phenotypes depending on brain regions involved. Beside the most abundant memory variant, several atypical variants exist. Among them posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is associated with severe visuospatial/visuoperceptual deficits in the absence of significant primary ocular disease. Here, we report for the first time a case of Capgras delusion-a delusional misidentification syndrome, where patients think that familiar persons are replaced by identical "doubles" or an impostor-in a patient with PCA. The 57-year-old female patient was diagnosed with PCA and developed Capgras delusion 8 years after first symptoms. The patient did not recognize her husband, misidentified him as a stranger, and perceived him as a threat. Such misidentifications did not happen for other persons. Events could be interrupted by reassuring the husband's identity by the patient's female friend or children. We applied in-depth multimodal neuroimaging phenotyping and used single-subject voxel-based morphometry to identify atrophy changes specifically related to the development of the Capgras delusion. The latter, based on structural T1 magnetic resonance imaging, revealed progressive gray matter volume decline in occipital and temporoparietal areas, involving more the right than the left hemisphere, especially at the beginning. Correspondingly, the right fusiform gyrus was already affected by atrophy at baseline, whereas the left fusiform gyrus became involved in the further disease course. At baseline, glucose hypometabolism as measured by positron emission tomography (PET) with F18-fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG-PET) was evident in the parietooccipital cortex, more pronounced right-sided, and in the right frontotemporal cortex. Amyloid accumulation as assessed by PET with F18-florbetaben was found in the gray matter of the neocortex indicating underlying Alzheimer's disease. Appearance of the Capgras delusion was related to atrophy in the right posterior cingulate gyrus/precuneus, as well as right middle frontal gyrus/frontal eye field, supporting right frontal areas as particularly relevant for Capgras delusion. Atrophy in these regions respectively might affect the default mode and dorsal attention networks as shown by meta-analytical co-activation and resting state functional connectivity analyses. This case elucidates the brain-behavior relationship in PCA and Capgras delusion.
Keywords: Balint’s syndrome; Capgras delusion; MRI; delusional misidentification syndrome; posterior cortical atrophy.
Publication
Journal: Cortex
June/16/2020
Abstract
Here we describe a rare case of Capgras delusion - a misidentification syndrome characterized by the belief that a person has been replaced by an imposter - in a patient without evident neurological or psychiatric symptoms. Intriguingly, delusional belief was selective for both person and modality, as the patient believed that his son - not his daughter or other relatives - was substituted with an imposter only while being in presence of him and looking at his face, but not when merely listening to his voice. A neuroanatomical reconstruction obtained integrating morphological and functional patient's neuroimaging data highlighted two main peculiarities: a compression of the rostral portion of right temporal lobe due to a large arachnoid cyst, and a bilaterally reduced metabolism of frontal areas. Autonomic data obtained from thermal infra-red camera and skin conductance recordings showed that a higher sympathetic activation was evoked by the observation of daughter's face, relative to the observation of the son's face as well as of not-familiar faces; conversely, daughter and son voices elicited a similar sympathetic activation, higher relative to not-familiar voices, indicating a modality-dependent dissociation consistent with the delusional behavior. Our case supports the "two-hit hypothesis" about Capgras delusion etiopathogenesis: here, the first hit is represented by the right-temporal lesion impairing the association between familiar faces and emotional values, the second one is the frontal bilateral hypometabolism favoring delusional behavior. The selective occurrence of "imposter" delusion for a particular subject and for a specific perceptual modality suggests the involvement of modality-specific interactions in the retrieval of affective properties during familiar people recognition.
Keywords: Capgras syndrome; Faces recognition; Imposter delusion; Misidentification; Neuroimaging.
Publication
Journal: International Review of Psychiatry
May/7/2020
Abstract
Capgras and Fregoli syndromes are two psychotic and complex conditions also known as Delusional Misidentification Syndromes (DMSs). Their description dates back to the beginning of XX century, and many explanatory models have been formulated through myths, psychoanalytical and psychological hypotheses, as well as neurobiological proposals. Even if DMSs are not fully considered in the modern diagnostic manuals, they still remain intriguing phenomena to be clinically observed and explained. Also, the employment of psychotropics and physical techniques in the treatment of such conditions is not supported by robust evidences and this may encourage further studies. We conclude that it would be of great interest to brush up the neglected MDSs in order to improve our knowledge on the underlying mechanisms of delusion and brain functioning.
Publication
Journal: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
January/8/2020
Abstract
This is a case report of an atypical presentation of early onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) in a young patient with Capgras syndrome and cognitive impairment. The concurrent onset of psychiatric and cognitive symptoms prompted a detailed evaluation for a neurodegenerative disease. A 50-year-old male lawyer presented with low mood, apathy, delusions, and auditory hallucinations over 18 months. He considered his wife as an imposter and would require her text message to confirm her identity. He became more forgetful and had to give up his law practice. His neuropsychological assessment was impaired in all domains. Genetic testing revealed homozygosity for APOEe4 alleles. His magnetic resonance imaging showed predominant parietal and medial temporal atrophy, [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed frontal, parietal and posterior temporal hypometabolism and [18F]Flutemetamol positron emission tomography was positive for amyloid deposition, leading to the diagnosis of EOAD. This case highlights EOAD as a differential diagnosis in young patients who present with Capgras syndrome.
Publication
Journal: Orvosi Hetilap
October/14/2019
Abstract
Capgras symptom is characterized by the delusional belief that a person significant to the patient has been replaced by a 'double' or 'impostor'. Capgras symptom was discussed to be associated with violent behavior. We report here the cases of two male patients with schizophrenia paranoid type, where parricide was connected to Capgras delusion. It is important to emphasize that in our observed cases, non-adherence played an essential role in the development of violent behavior, parricide. Orv Hetil. 2019; 160(42): 1673-1676.
Publication
Journal: Psychopathology
July/21/2019
Abstract
Capgras' delusion has captured psychiatrists' imaginations, but the clinical features of the delusion have rarely been studied and presented systematically.The present study systematically reviews all case reports on Capgras' delusion in the English language in order to better understand differences between organic and functional aetiologies.All medical and psychiatric databases were searched, as were the bibliographies of published case reports, narrative reviews, and book chapters.A total of 258 cases were identified from 175 papers. Functional Capgras' delusion was more associated with a wider variety of imposters; multiple imposters; other misidentification syndromes; auditory hallucinations; other delusions; and formal thought disorder. Organic cases were associated with age; inanimate objects; memory and visual-spatial impairments; right hemispheric dysfunction; and visual hallucinations. Executive dysfunction and aggression were associated with both types.Specific features of the -Capgras' delusional content and associated signs point to either organic or functional aetiology. The delusion is more amorphous than many theorists have supposed, which challenges their explanatory models.
Publication
Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
June/17/2019
Abstract
Capgras syndrome (CS), also called imposter syndrome, is a rare psychiatric condition that is characterized by the delusion that a family relative or close friend has been replaced by an identical imposter. Here, we describe a 69-year-old man with CS who presented to the Kemal Arikan Psychiatry Clinic with an ongoing belief that his wife had been replaced by an identical imposter. MRI showed selective anterior left temporal lobe atrophy. Quantitative EEG showed bilateral frontal and temporal slowing. Neuropsychological profiling identified a broad range of deficits in the areas of naming, executive function, and long-term memory. On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed frontotemporal dementia. This case demonstrates that CS can clinically accompany frontotemporal dementia.
Publication
Journal: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
June/8/2019
Abstract
The present paper aims to describe a case of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder relapse leading to attempted murder, review literature, and investigate the epidemiological data and expression of violent behavior among Capgras-related incidents. 109 case reports deriving from various scientific areas dating from 1971 to 2017 were evaluated and juxtaposed with an equivalent comparison group of random psychiatry inpatients, who were examined for the same variables. Quantitative and qualitative differences were observed between samples. High level of interpersonal violence was disclosed among Capgras-related incidents, especially towards the main care-givers, with higher propensity among male patients. Homicidal behavior was also expressed in higher levels among male patients experiencing the Capgras delusion. A multidisciplinary approach is vital for the optimal management of these incidents. Further research on the pathophysiology of Capgras delusion with the utilization of functional imaging techniques is of exceptional significance for the understanding of issues of neuroscience.
Publication
Journal: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry
April/23/2019
Abstract
Two-factor theory suggests delusions require two neuropsychological impairments, one in perception (which furnishes content), and a second in belief evaluation (that augers formation and maintenance). Capgras delusion; the belief that one's loved one has been replaced by an imposter, then entails two independent processes; first a lack of skin conductance response to familiar faces so the loved one feels different. This has been demonstrated in four patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) but who do not have delusions. Thus two-factor theorists demand a second factor: a change in belief evaluation, which is associated with damage to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFC).Literature review of foundational and related papers on the cognitive neuropsychology of delusions, perception and belief.The four vmPFC patients appear together in another publication, uncited by two-factor theorists, in which the full extent of their damage is documented. These four cases not only lack skin responses to familiar faces, but lack responses to salient psychological stimuli more generally, which challenges factor one. They also have damage outside vmPFC, including damage to rDLPFC, which challenges factor two.Two-factor theory is found lacking and should be reappraised.
Publication
Journal: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry
April/16/2019
Abstract
Corlett (Corlett, P. (this issue). Factor one, familiarity and frontal cortex: A challenge to the two-factor theory of delusions. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry) provides a robust critique of the two-factor theory of delusions. The heart of his critique is two challenges he derives from a paper by Tranel and Damasio (Tranel, D., & Damasio, H. (1994). Neuroanatomical correlates of electrodermal skin conductance responses. Psychophysiology, 31(5), 427-438), who illuminate the autonomic responses and brain damage of four patients often cited in support of the two-factor theory of Capgras delusion. I defend the two-factor theory against Corlett's two key challenges, arguing that his first challenge has been previously addressed, and that his second challenge is overstated. In my view, these challenges do not negate the two-factor account. Nevertheless, two-factor theorists - and computational psychiatrists - should continue to devise and test falsifiable predictions of their respective theories.
Authors
Publication
Journal: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry
February/22/2019
Abstract
Although important to cognitive neuropsychiatry and theories of delusions, Capgras delusion has largely been reported in single case studies. Bell et al. [2017. Uncovering Capgras delusion using a large scale medical records database. British Journal of Psychiatry Open, 3(4), 179-185] previously deployed computational and clinical case identification on a large-scale medical records database to report a case series of 84 individuals with Capgras delusion. We replicated this approach on a new database from a different mental health service provider while additionally examining instances of violence, given previous claims that Capgras is a forensic risk.We identified 34 additional cases of Capgras. Delusion phenomenology, clinical characteristics, and presence of lesions detected by neuroimaging were extracted.Although most cases involved misidentification of family members or partners, a notable minority (20.6%) included the misidentification of others. Capgras typically did not present as a monothematic delusion. Few cases had identifiable lesions with no evidence of right-hemisphere bias. There was no evidence of physical violence associated with Capgras.Findings closely replicate Bell et al. (2017). The majority of Capgras delusion phenomenology conforms to the "dual route" model although a significant minority of cases cannot be explained by this framework.
Publication
Journal: Federal practitioner : for the health care professionals of the VA, DoD, and PHS
February/15/2019
Abstract
This uncommon delusion is associated with varied psychiatric, medical, iatrogenic, and neurologic conditions and may be difficult to fully resolve.
Publication
Journal: Case Reports in Psychiatry
November/13/2018
Abstract
Capgras syndrome is characterized by the delusional belief that a familiar person has been replaced by a visually similar imposter or replica. Rarely, the delusional focus may be objects rather than people. Numerous etiologies have been described for Capgras to include seizures. Similarly, visual hallucinations, both simple and complex, can occur secondary to seizure activity. We present, to our knowledge, the first reported case of visual hallucinations and Capgras delusions for objects that developed secondary to new onset occipital lobe epilepsy. We then discuss the possible underlying neurologic mechanisms responsible for the symptomatology.
Publication
Journal: Psychiatrikē = Psychiatriki
October/9/2018
Abstract
The Delusional Misidentification Syndromes (DMSs) are characterized by defective integration of the normally The Delusional Misidentification Syndromes (DMSs) are characterized by defective integration of the normally fused functions of perception and recognition. The classical sub-types are: the syndromes of Capgras, Fregoli,Intermetamorphosis (mentioned in 3) and Subjective doubles. These syndromes occur in a clear sensorium and shouldbe differentiated from the banal transient misidentifications occurring in confusional states and in mania and from thenon-delusional misidentifications (e.g. prosopagnosia). Joseph Capgras, who described the best-known sub-type, was indecisive on its pathogenesis. In his original report he defined the syndrome as "agnosia of identification" produced by a conflict between affective accompaniments ofsensory and mnemonic images. In his subsequent two publications, he considered the syndrome as a restitution delusionand as a psychopathological mechanism to hide incestuous desires. For more details see the chapter by J.P. Luaute in avolume on DMS. Psychodynamic approaches are, essentially, variants of the formulation that DMSs result from ambivalent feelings resolvedby directing hate feelings onto an imagined double in order to retain the original intact (and thus avoid guilt).These views have been voiced by David Enoch [relevant chapter in (3)] and with variations by many other investigatorsreviewed by Oyebode. Regression to archaic modes of thought (like thinking in terms of doubles and dualisms) due to personality disintegrationproduced by psychotic illness is a fascinating hypothesis by John Todd [mentioned in (1)]. However, if this was thecase, DMS should be much more frequent. Mayer-Gross and Ackner (mentioned in 9) had observed that when there is a delusional development, depersonalization-derealization experiences tend to be included within the delusional system. Such experiences usually precede orcoincide with the onset of DMS. In view of this, Christodoulou suggested that DMSs may represent delusional evolutions of depersonalization-derealization experiences. Similar mechanisms were proposed for false memories of familiarity,reduplicative paramnesia and autoscopy. Cerebral "dysrhythmia" has also been noted in patients with DMS. In view of clinical and prognostic similarities of DMSpatients with patients suffering from psychotic states occurring in an epileptic setting, many of these patients have beenconsidered as suffering from broadly speaking "epileptic" psychoses. Joseph [mentioned in (6)] suggested that organiccauses produce disconnection between right and left cortical areas that decode afferent sensory information. This resultsin the creation of a separate image in each hemisphere leading to an awareness of two, physically identical images. Ellis and Young [mentioned in (1) and (6)] have maintained that DMS may result from defects at different stages of aninformation processing chain. More specifically, the Capgras Syndrome appears when the route for unconscious recognitionis damaged. Similar mechanisms have been proposed for the rest of the subtypes. Margariti and Kontaxakis8 have considered that in DMS there is disruption of the ability to recognize identities ratherthan superficial appearance. Others have maintained that DMSs are multimodal neuropathologies and cannot be linkedto a single cognitive defect. Lastly, in view of the marked organic abnormalities detected in all DMS subtypes, DMSs have been linked with a greatnumber of organic conditions [reviewed in detail by Oyebode (5)]. According to Greek mythology, Procrustes was a bandit who stretched or amputated the limbs of his guests to fit hisiron bed. The DMSs do not deserve such treatment. Submitting them to the procrustean bed of uniformity should be avoided. People develop DMS for a variety of reasons. Most subjects have right hemisphere dysfunction but not exclusively.Their condition is associated not with one but with diverse phenomena (depersonalization - derealization, prosopagnosia,false memories of familiarity, autoscopy, reduplicative paramnesia etc.) similarities with psychotic phenomena associatedwith epilepsy have been suggested but this refers to some patients only. Additionally, the charged emotionalrelationship of the patient with the misidentified person(s) is neither necessary nor sufficient. Diagnostically speaking, many roads lead to DMS, ranging from the monosymptomatic and monothematic one (consideredas par excellence DMS) to that associated with disorders mainly of the schizophrenic or organic spectrum. DMScan also be reached by a more "superficial" road, the one of depression, in which the delusion is secondary and often dependenton the self-depreciation ideation. Speculating on these syndromes is a fascinating journey in psychopathologybut, although in most cases an organic contributor is present, yet the great diversity of conditions in the setting of whichDMSs occur renders the possibility of a unifying hypothesis unlikely.
Publication
Journal: L'Encephale
September/20/2018
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
Delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS) correspond to the delusional belief of misidentification of familiar persons, places or objects and to the conviction that they have been replaced or transformed. Several cases of patients who developed violent behavior while suffering from DMS have been published. This led some authors to consider patients with DMS at risk of violence. However, only a few studies have focused on the potential relationship between violence and DMS. The aim of our study was to explore this relationship with a literature review of published cases of patients having committed violent acts associated to DMS.
METHODS
A systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed up to January 2017 using the following term combination "misidentification" and "violence" Fifteen cases of patients with DMS who had committed violent acts were identified. The data from these descriptions were analyzed and synthetized.
RESULTS
Most of the patients were men with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and Capgras syndrome. Acts of violence were severe with a relatively high number of murders or attempted murders. For half of the patients these violent acts were perpetrated with weapons. Victims were regularly the patient's family members and the assaults were usually not planned. Delusional syndromes often progressed for several years. Importantly, substance abuse, which is known to increase the risk of violence in patients with schizophrenia, was only observed in two patients.
CONCLUSIONS
DMS are associated with several risk factors of violence, such as a diagnosis of schizophrenia, specific delusions including megalomania, persecution, negative affects and identified targets. Despite this risk for severe violence, there are no existing guidelines on how to assess and treat DMS in schizophrenia. Accordingly, we propose (1) the establishment of formal diagnostic criteria, (2) the development of rigorous research on these syndromes and (3) the integration of DMS in assessment of violence risk in schizophrenic patients.
Publication
Journal: Revue Medicale Suisse
June/25/2018
Abstract
Capgras delusion is classified with the misidentification syndromes. In dementia it associates cognitive deficiency of memory and facial recognition (prosopoagnosia) with delirious idea of substitution by a double. The first reported case in the paper describes the important affective and comportmental reactions due to the identification of a double perceived as an imposter, affecting both the suffering person and his family. Rarely, as reported in the second case, misrecognition concerns the person itself (autoprosopagnosia) who can have the illusion to be in front of a twin brother (« auto-Capgras »). We discuss data from the literature concerning prevalence, results of cerebral imaging and functional prognosis associated with this curious syndrome.
Related with
Publication
Journal: Postgraduate Medicine
March/25/2018
Abstract
Syndromes of delusional misidentification consist of disordered familiarity and have been reported in diverse diagnoses, including Parkinson's disease. Although the most common delusional misidentification is Capgras syndrome, in which the sufferer believes a familiar person has been replaced by an identical imposter, other forms have been also described. The pathogenesis of delusions of misidentification appears to require dysfunction of or connection to a left cerebral cortical area involved in recognition of familiarity, and also right frontal cortex serving belief evaluation. Two cases of Parkinson's disease with an unusual delusional misidentification, intermetamorphosis, are presented, along with their improvement with pimavanserin, a novel atypical antipsychotic medication.
load more...