Yu Zhang
Citations
All
Search in:AllTitleAbstractAuthor name
Publications
(6K+)
Patents
Grants
Pathways
Clinical trials
Publication
Journal: Nature
January/2/2008
Abstract
Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.
Publication
Journal: Nature
May/1/2011
Abstract
Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development.
Publication
Journal: New England Journal of Medicine
April/27/2011
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Heightened surveillance of acute febrile illness in China since 2009 has led to the identification of a severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) with an unknown cause. Infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum has been suggested as a cause, but the pathogen has not been detected in most patients on laboratory testing.
METHODS
We obtained blood samples from patients with the case definition of SFTS in six provinces in China. The blood samples were used to isolate the causal pathogen by inoculation of cell culture and for detection of viral RNA on polymerase-chain-reaction assay. The pathogen was characterized on electron microscopy and nucleic acid sequencing. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and neutralization testing to analyze the level of virus-specific antibody in patients' serum samples.
RESULTS
We isolated a novel virus, designated SFTS bunyavirus, from patients who presented with fever, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and multiorgan dysfunction. RNA sequence analysis revealed that the virus was a newly identified member of the genus phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae family. Electron-microscopical examination revealed virions with the morphologic characteristics of a bunyavirus. The presence of the virus was confirmed in 171 patients with SFTS from six provinces by detection of viral RNA, specific antibodies to the virus in blood, or both. Serologic assays showed a virus-specific immune response in all 35 pairs of serum samples collected from patients during the acute and convalescent phases of the illness.
CONCLUSIONS
A novel phlebovirus was identified in patients with a life-threatening illness associated with fever and thrombocytopenia in China. (Funded by the China Mega-Project for Infectious Diseases and others.).
Publication
Journal: Neuron
August/12/2002
Abstract
In vitro studies indicate a role for the LIM kinase family in the regulation of cofilin phosphorylation and actin dynamics. In addition, abnormal expression of LIMK-1 is associated with Williams syndrome, a mental disorder with profound deficits in visuospatial cognition. However, the in vivo function of this family of kinases remains elusive. Using LIMK-1 knockout mice, we demonstrate a significant role for LIMK-1 in vivo in regulating cofilin and the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, we show that the knockout mice exhibited significant abnormalities in spine morphology and in synaptic function, including enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation. The knockout mice also showed altered fear responses and spatial learning. These results indicate that LIMK-1 plays a critical role in dendritic spine morphogenesis and brain function.
Publication
Journal: EMBO Journal
April/14/2003
Abstract
Microtubules are cylindrical cytoskeletal structures found in almost all eukaryotic cell types which are involved in a great variety of cellular processes. Reversible acetylation on the epsilon-amino group of alpha-tubulin Lys40 marks stabilized microtubule structures and may contribute to regulating microtubule dynamics. Yet, the enzymes catalysing this acetylation/deacetylation have remained unidentified until recently. Here we report that beta-tubulin interacts with histone deacetylase-6 (HDAC-6) in a yeast two-hybrid assay and in vitro. We find that HDAC-6 is a micro tubule-associated protein capable of deacetylating alpha-tubulin in vivo and in vitro. HDAC-6's microtubule binding and deacetylation functions both depend on the hdac domains. Overexpression of HDAC-6 in mammalian cells leads to tubulin hypoacetylation. In contrast, inhibition of HDAC-6 function by two independent mechanisms--pharmacological (HDAC inhibitors) or genetic (targeted inactivation of HDAC-6 in embryonic stem cells)--leads to hyperacetylation of tubulin and microtubules. Taken together, our data provide evidence that HDAC-6 might act as a dual deacetylase for tubulin and histones, and suggest the possibility that acetylated non-histone proteins might represent novel targets for pharmacological therapy by HDAC inhibitors.
Publication
Journal: Cell
September/22/2009
Abstract
Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) exerts pathway-specific activity in animal development and has been linked to several high-risk cancers. Here, we report that LSD1 is an integral component of the Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. Transcriptional target analysis revealed that the LSD1/NuRD complexes regulate several cellular signaling pathways including TGFbeta1 signaling pathway that are critically involved in cell proliferation, survival, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We demonstrated that LSD1 inhibits the invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and suppresses breast cancer metastatic potential in vivo. We found that LSD1 is downregulated in breast carcinomas and that its level of expression is negatively correlated with that of TGFbeta1. Our data provide a molecular basis for the interplay of histone demethylation and deacetylation in chromatin remodeling. By enlisting LSD1, the NuRD complex expands its chromatin remodeling capacity to include ATPase, histone deacetylase, and histone demethylase.
Publication
Journal: Cell
April/19/2012
Abstract
The extent to which the three-dimensional organization of the genome contributes to chromosomal translocations is an important question in cancer genomics. We generated a high-resolution Hi-C spatial organization map of the G1-arrested mouse pro-B cell genome and used high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing to map translocations from target DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within it. RAG endonuclease-cleaved antigen-receptor loci are dominant translocation partners for target DSBs regardless of genomic position, reflecting high-frequency DSBs at these loci and their colocalization in a fraction of cells. To directly assess spatial proximity contributions, we normalized genomic DSBs via ionizing radiation. Under these conditions, translocations were highly enriched in cis along single chromosomes containing target DSBs and within other chromosomes and subchromosomal domains in a manner directly related to pre-existing spatial proximity. By combining two high-throughput genomic methods in a genetically tractable system, we provide a new lens for viewing cancer genomes.
Publication
Journal: Nature
February/17/2014
Abstract
RNA structure has critical roles in processes ranging from ligand sensing to the regulation of translation, polyadenylation and splicing. However, a lack of genome-wide in vivo RNA structural data has limited our understanding of how RNA structure regulates gene expression in living cells. Here we present a high-throughput, genome-wide in vivo RNA structure probing method, structure-seq, in which dimethyl sulphate methylation of unprotected adenines and cytosines is identified by next-generation sequencing. Application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings yielded the first in vivo genome-wide RNA structure map at nucleotide resolution for any organism, with quantitative structural information across more than 10,000 transcripts. Our analysis reveals a three-nucleotide periodic repeat pattern in the structure of coding regions, as well as a less-structured region immediately upstream of the start codon, and shows that these features are strongly correlated with translation efficiency. We also find patterns of strong and weak secondary structure at sites of alternative polyadenylation, as well as strong secondary structure at 5' splice sites that correlates with unspliced events. Notably, in vivo structures of messenger RNAs annotated for stress responses are poorly predicted in silico, whereas mRNA structures of genes related to cell function maintenance are well predicted. Global comparison of several structural features between these two categories shows that the mRNAs associated with stress responses tend to have more single-strandedness, longer maximal loop length and higher free energy per nucleotide, features that may allow these RNAs to undergo conformational changes in response to environmental conditions. Structure-seq allows the RNA structurome and its biological roles to be interrogated on a genome-wide scale and should be applicable to any organism.
Publication
Journal: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
May/25/2011
Abstract
Although aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) is a hallmark of cancer, key questions, including when, how, and why cancer cells become highly glycolytic, remain less clear. For a largely unknown regulatory mechanism, a rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform is exclusively expressed in embryonic, proliferating, and tumor cells, and plays an essential role in tumor metabolism and growth. Because the receptor tyrosine kinase/PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (RTK/PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling cascade is a frequently altered pathway in cancer, we explored its potential role in cancer metabolism. We identified mTOR as a central activator of the Warburg effect by inducing PKM2 and other glycolytic enzymes under normoxic conditions. PKM2 level was augmented in mouse kidney tumors due to deficiency of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 and consequent mTOR activation, and was reduced in human cancer cells by mTOR suppression. mTOR up-regulation of PKM2 expression was through hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α)-mediated transcription activation, and c-Myc-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs)-dependent regulation of PKM2 gene splicing. Disruption of PKM2 suppressed oncogenic mTOR-mediated tumorigenesis. Unlike normal cells, mTOR hyperactive cells were more sensitive to inhibition of mTOR or glycolysis. Dual suppression of mTOR and glycolysis synergistically blunted the proliferation and tumor development of mTOR hyperactive cells. Even though aerobic glycolysis is not required for breach of senescence for immortalization and transformation, the frequently deregulated mTOR signaling during multistep oncogenic processes could contribute to the development of the Warburg effect in many cancers. Components of the mTOR/HIF1α/Myc-hnRNPs/PKM2 glycolysis signaling network could be targeted for the treatment of cancer caused by an aberrant RTK/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.
Publication
Journal: Nature
December/11/2002
Abstract
Rice is the principal food for over half of the population of the world. With its genome size of 430 megabase pairs (Mb), the cultivated rice species Oryza sativa is a model plant for genome research. Here we report the sequence analysis of chromosome 4 of O. sativa, one of the first two rice chromosomes to be sequenced completely. The finished sequence spans 34.6 Mb and represents 97.3% of the chromosome. In addition, we report the longest known sequence for a plant centromere, a completely sequenced contig of 1.16 Mb corresponding to the centromeric region of chromosome 4. We predict 4,658 protein coding genes and 70 transfer RNA genes. A total of 1,681 predicted genes match available unique rice expressed sequence tags. Transposable elements have a pronounced bias towards the euchromatic regions, indicating a close correlation of their distributions to genes along the chromosome. Comparative genome analysis between cultivated rice subspecies shows that there is an overall syntenic relationship between the chromosomes and divergence at the level of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions and deletions. By contrast, there is little conservation in gene order between rice and Arabidopsis.
Publication
Journal: Molecular and Cellular Biology
March/16/2008
Abstract
Posttranslational modifications play important roles in regulating protein structure and function. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a mostly cytoplasmic class II HDAC, which has a unique structure with two catalytic domains and a domain binding ubiquitin with high affinity. This enzyme was recently identified as a multisubstrate protein deacetylase that can act on acetylated histone tails, alpha-tubulin and Hsp90. To investigate the in vivo functions of HDAC6 and the relevance of tubulin acetylation/deacetylation, we targeted the HDAC6 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and generated knockout mice. HDAC6-deficient mice are viable and fertile and show hyperacetylated tubulin in most tissues. The highest level of expression of HDAC6 is seen in the testis, yet development and function of this organ are normal in the absence of HDAC6. Likewise, lymphoid development is normal, but the immune response is moderately affected. Furthermore, the lack of HDAC6 results in a small increase in cancellous bone mineral density, indicating that this deacetylase plays a minor role in bone biology. HDAC6-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts show apparently normal microtubule organization and stability and also show increased Hsp90 acetylation correlating with impaired Hsp90 function. Collectively, these data demonstrate that mice survive well without HDAC6 and that tubulin hyperacetylation is not detrimental to normal mammalian development.
Publication
Journal: Cell
November/29/2011
Abstract
Whereas chromosomal translocations are common pathogenetic events in cancer, mechanisms that promote them are poorly understood. To elucidate translocation mechanisms in mammalian cells, we developed high-throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS). We employed HTGTS to identify tens of thousands of independent translocation junctions involving fixed I-SceI meganuclease-generated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the c-myc oncogene or IgH locus of B lymphocytes induced for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent IgH class switching. DSBs translocated widely across the genome but were preferentially targeted to transcribed chromosomal regions. Additionally, numerous AID-dependent and AID-independent hot spots were targeted, with the latter comprising mainly cryptic I-SceI targets. Comparison of translocation junctions with genome-wide nuclear run-ons revealed a marked association between transcription start sites and translocation targeting. The majority of translocation junctions were formed via end-joining with short microhomologies. Our findings have implications for diverse fields, including gene therapy and cancer genomics.
Publication
Journal: Nature
March/28/2010
Abstract
The genetic structure of the indigenous hunter-gatherer peoples of southern Africa, the oldest known lineage of modern human, is important for understanding human diversity. Studies based on mitochondrial and small sets of nuclear markers have shown that these hunter-gatherers, known as Khoisan, San, or Bushmen, are genetically divergent from other humans. However, until now, fully sequenced human genomes have been limited to recently diverged populations. Here we present the complete genome sequences of an indigenous hunter-gatherer from the Kalahari Desert and a Bantu from southern Africa, as well as protein-coding regions from an additional three hunter-gatherers from disparate regions of the Kalahari. We characterize the extent of whole-genome and exome diversity among the five men, reporting 1.3 million novel DNA differences genome-wide, including 13,146 novel amino acid variants. In terms of nucleotide substitutions, the Bushmen seem to be, on average, more different from each other than, for example, a European and an Asian. Observed genomic differences between the hunter-gatherers and others may help to pinpoint genetic adaptations to an agricultural lifestyle. Adding the described variants to current databases will facilitate inclusion of southern Africans in medical research efforts, particularly when family and medical histories can be correlated with genome-wide data.
Publication
Journal: Genome Research
January/2/2012
Abstract
High-throughput sequencing of cDNA (RNA-seq) is a widely deployed transcriptome profiling and annotation technique, but questions about the performance of different protocols and platforms remain. We used a newly developed pool of 96 synthetic RNAs with various lengths, and GC content covering a 2(20) concentration range as spike-in controls to measure sensitivity, accuracy, and biases in RNA-seq experiments as well as to derive standard curves for quantifying the abundance of transcripts. We observed linearity between read density and RNA input over the entire detection range and excellent agreement between replicates, but we observed significantly larger imprecision than expected under pure Poisson sampling errors. We use the control RNAs to directly measure reproducible protocol-dependent biases due to GC content and transcript length as well as stereotypic heterogeneity in coverage across transcripts correlated with position relative to RNA termini and priming sequence bias. These effects lead to biased quantification for short transcripts and individual exons, which is a serious problem for measurements of isoform abundances, but that can partially be corrected using appropriate models of bias. By using the control RNAs, we derive limits for the discovery and detection of rare transcripts in RNA-seq experiments. By using data collected as part of the model organism and human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements projects (ENCODE and modENCODE), we demonstrate that external RNA controls are a useful resource for evaluating sensitivity and accuracy of RNA-seq experiments for transcriptome discovery and quantification. These quality metrics facilitate comparable analysis across different samples, protocols, and platforms.
Publication
Journal: Cell Stem Cell
October/20/2009
Publication
Journal: Journal of Biological Chemistry
August/17/2008
Abstract
SOX genes encode a family of high-mobility group transcription factors that play critical roles in organogenesis. The functional specificity of different SOX proteins and the tissue specificity of a particular SOX factor are largely determined by the differential partnership of SOX transcription factors with other transcription regulators, many of which have not yet been discovered. Virtually all members of the SOX family have been found to be deregulated in a wide variety of tumors. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular behaviors involved in the oncogenic potential of SOX proteins. Using cell culture experiments, tissue analysis, molecular profiling, and animal studies, we report here that SOX2 promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by facilitating the G(1)/S transition and through its transcription regulation of the CCND1 gene in breast cancer cells. In addition, we identified beta-catenin as the transcription partner for SOX2 and demonstrated that SOX2 and beta-catenin act in synergy in the transcription regulation of CCND1 in breast cancer cells. Our experiments not only determined a role for SOX2 in mammary tumorigenesis but also revealed another activity of the multifunctional protein, beta-catenin.
Publication
Journal: Science
October/22/2014
Abstract
Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an inhibitory receptor found on immune cells. The consequences of mutations in CTLA4 in humans are unknown. We identified germline heterozygous mutations in CTLA4 in subjects with severe immune dysregulation from four unrelated families. Whereas Ctla4 heterozygous mice have no obvious phenotype, human CTLA4 haploinsufficiency caused dysregulation of FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, hyperactivation of effector T cells, and lymphocytic infiltration of target organs. Patients also exhibited progressive loss of circulating B cells, associated with an increase of predominantly autoreactive CD21(lo) B cells and accumulation of B cells in nonlymphoid organs. Inherited human CTLA4 haploinsufficiency demonstrates a critical quantitative role for CTLA-4 in governing T and B lymphocyte homeostasis.
Publication
Journal: Nature Genetics
November/26/2007
Abstract
Epistatic interactions among multiple genetic variants in the human genome may be important in determining individual susceptibility to common diseases. Although some existing computational methods for identifying genetic interactions have been effective for small-scale studies, we here propose a method, denoted 'bayesian epistasis association mapping' (BEAM), for genome-wide case-control studies. BEAM treats the disease-associated markers and their interactions via a bayesian partitioning model and computes, via Markov chain Monte Carlo, the posterior probability that each marker set is associated with the disease. Testing this on an age-related macular degeneration genome-wide association data set, we demonstrate that the method is significantly more powerful than existing approaches and that genome-wide case-control epistasis mapping with many thousands of markers is both computationally and statistically feasible.
Publication
Journal: Nature
January/2/2008
Abstract
Both genome content and deployment contribute to phenotypic differences between species. Sex is the most important difference between individuals in a species and has long been posited to be rapidly evolving. Indeed, in the Drosophila genus, traits such as sperm length, genitalia, and gonad size are the most obvious differences between species. Comparative analysis of sex-biased expression should deepen our understanding of the relationship between genome content and deployment during evolution. Using existing and newly assembled genomes, we designed species-specific microarrays to examine sex-biased expression of orthologues and species-restricted genes in D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. yakuba, D. ananassae, D. pseudoobscura, D. virilis and D. mojavensis. We show that averaged sex-biased expression changes accumulate monotonically over time within the genus. However, different genes contribute to expression variance within species groups compared to between groups. We observed greater turnover of species-restricted genes with male-biased expression, indicating that gene formation and extinction may play a significant part in species differences. Genes with male-biased expression also show the greatest expression and DNA sequence divergence. This higher divergence and turnover of genes with male-biased expression may be due to high transcription rates in the male germline, greater functional pleiotropy of genes expressed in females, and/or sexual competition.
Publication
Journal: Cell
March/27/2013
Abstract
Chromosomal translocations involving antigen receptor loci are common in lymphoid malignancies. Translocations require DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at two chromosomal sites, their physical juxtaposition, and their fusion by end-joining. Ability of lymphocytes to generate diverse repertoires of antigen receptors and effector antibodies derives from programmed genomic alterations that produce DSBs. We discuss these lymphocyte-specific processes, with a focus on mechanisms that provide requisite DSB target specificity and mechanisms that suppress DSB translocation. We also discuss recent work that provides new insights into DSB repair pathways and the influences of three-dimensional genome organization on physiological processes and cancer genomes.
Publication
Journal: Nature
January/2/2008
Abstract
X chromosomes evolve differently from autosomes, but general governing principles have not emerged. For example, genes with male-biased expression are under-represented on the X chromosome of D. melanogaster, but are randomly distributed in the genome of Anopheles gambiae. In direct global profiling experiments using species-specific microarrays, we find a nearly identical paucity of genes with male-biased expression on D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. yakuba, D. ananassae, D. virilis and D. mojavensis X chromosomes. We observe the same under-representation on the neo-X of D. pseudoobscura. It has been suggested that precocious meiotic silencing of the X chromosome accounts for reduced X chromosome male-biased expression in nematodes, mammals and Drosophila. We show that X chromosome genes with male-biased expression are under-represented in somatic cells and in mitotic male germ cells. These data are incompatible with simple X chromosome inactivation models. Using expression profiling and comparative sequence analysis, we show that selective gene extinction on the X chromosome, creation of new genes on autosomes and changed genomic location of existing genes contribute to the unusual X chromosome gene content.
Publication
Journal: Trends in Genetics
May/28/2008
Abstract
Several contributing factors have been implicated in evolutionary rate heterogeneity among proteins, but their evolutionary mechanisms remain poorly characterized. The recently sequenced 12 Drosophila genomes provide a unique opportunity to shed light on these unresolved issues. Here, we focus on the role of natural selection in shaping evolutionary rates. We use the Drosophila genomic data to distinguish between factors that increase the strength of purifying selection on proteins and factors that affect the amount of positive selection experienced by proteins. We confirm the importance of translational selection in shaping protein evolution in Drosophila and show that factors such as tissue bias in expression, gene essentiality, intron number, and recombination rate also contribute to evolutionary rate variation among proteins.
Publication
Journal: Nature Nanotechnology
September/9/2008
Abstract
Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.
Publication
Journal: Clinical Cancer Research
December/3/2006
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
The most common genitourinary malignancy in China is bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Early diagnosis of new and recurrent bladder cancers, followed by timely treatment, will help decrease mortality. There are currently no satisfactory markers for bladder cancer available in clinics. Better diagnostic methods are highly demanded.
METHODS
In this research, we have used comprehensive expressed sequence tag analysis, serial analysis of gene expression, and microarray analysis and quickly discovered a candidate marker, urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1). The UCA1 gene was characterized and its performance as a urine marker was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with urine sediments. A total of 212 individuals were included in this study, 94 having bladder cancers, 33 ureter/pelvic cancers, and 85 normal and other urinary tract disease controls.
RESULTS
UCA1 was identified as a novel noncoding RNA gene dramatically up-regulated in TCC and it is the most TCC-specific gene yet identified. The full-length cDNA was 1,439 bp, and sequence analysis showed that it belonged to the human endogenous retrovirus H family. Clinical tests showed that UCA1 assay was highly specific (91.8%, 78 of 85) and very sensitive (80.9%, 76 of 94) in the diagnosis of bladder cancer and was especially valuable for superficial G2-G3 patients (sensitivity 91.1%, 41 of 45). It showed excellent differential diagnostic performance in various urinary tract diseases without TCC.
CONCLUSIONS
UCA1 is a very sensitive and specific unique marker for bladder cancer. It could have important implications in postoperative noninvasive follow-up. This research also highlights a shortcut to new cancer diagnostic assays through integration of in silico isolation methods with translational clinical tests based on RNA detection protocols.
load more...