Redesigning COVID 19 Care with Network Medicine and Machine Learning: A review
Journal: 2020/October - Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Abstract:
Emerging evidence regarding COVID 19 highlights the role of individual resistance and immune function in both susceptibility to infection as well as severity of disease. Multiple factors influence the response of the human host when exposed to viral pathogens. Influencing an individual's susceptibility to infection include such factors as nutritional status, physical and psychosocial stressors, obesity, protein calorie malnutrition, emotional resilience, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), environmental toxins-including air pollution and first- and second-hand tobacco smoke, sleep habits, sedentary lifestyle, drug-induced nutritional deficiencies and drug-induced immunomodulatory effects, availability of nutrient dense food and empty calories. This review examines the network of interacting co-factors that influence the host-pathogen relationship, which in turn determine one's susceptibility to viral infections like COVID 19. It then evaluates the role of machine learning, including predictive analytics and random forest modeling, to help clinicians assess patients' risk of developing active infection and devise a comprehensive approach to prevention and treatment.
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Redesigning COVID 19 Care with Network Medicine and Machine Learning: A review

Abstract

Emerging evidence regarding COVID 19 highlights the role of individual resistance and immune function in both susceptibility to infection as well as severity of disease. Multiple factors influence the response of the human host when exposed to viral pathogens. Influencing an individual’s susceptibility to infection include such factors as nutritional status, physical and psychosocial stressors, obesity, protein calorie malnutrition, emotional resilience, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), environmental toxins—including air pollution and first- and second-hand tobacco smoke, sleep habits, sedentary lifestyle, drug-induced nutritional deficiencies and drug-induced immunomodulatory effects, availability of nutrient dense food and empty calories. This review examines the network of interacting co-factors that influence the host-pathogen relationship, which in turn determine one’s susceptibility to viral infections like COVID 19. It then evaluates the role of machine learning, including predictive analytics and random forest modeling, to help clinicians assess patients’ risk of developing active infection and devise a comprehensive approach to prevention and treatment.

Corresponding author: Paul Cerrato, 100 Wickham Drive, Warwick, New York 10990, Phone: 845-986-9284,
Received 2020 Aug 18; Revised 2020 Sep 3; Accepted 2020 Sep 21.
Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.
Emerging evidence regarding COVID 19 highlights the role of individual resistance and immune function in both susceptibility to infection as well as severity of disease. Multiple factors influence the response of the human host when exposed to viral pathogens. Influencing an individual’s susceptibility to infection include such factors as nutritional status, physical and psychosocial stressors, obesity, protein calorie malnutrition, emotional resilience, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), environmental toxins—including air pollution and first- and second-hand tobacco smoke, sleep habits, sedentary lifestyle, drug-induced nutritional deficiencies and drug-induced immunomodulatory effects, availability of nutrient dense food and empty calories. This review examines the network of interacting co-factors that influence the host-pathogen relationship, which in turn determine one’s susceptibility to viral infections like COVID 19. It then evaluates the role of machine learning, including predictive analytics and random forest modeling, to help clinicians assess patients’ risk of developing active infection and devise a comprehensive approach to prevention and treatment.

Footnotes

The authors declare that there are no competing interests.

Author Contributions: Each author has made substantial contributions to the conception, analysis, and interpretation of data in this article. We have approved the submitted version, and agree both to be personally accountable for our contributions and to ensure that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work, even ones in which we are not personally involved, are appropriately investigated, resolved, and the resolution documented in the literature.

Footnotes
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