L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and its analogues as inhibitors of cysteine proteinases including cathepsins B, H and L.
Journal: 1982/July - Biochemical Journal
ISSN: 0264-6021
PUBMED: 7044372
Abstract:
1. L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) at a concentration of 0.5 mM had no effect on the serine proteinases plasma kallikrein and leucocyte elastase or the metalloproteinases thermolysin and clostridial collagenase. In contrast, 10 muM-E-64 rapidly inactivated the cysteine proteinases cathepsins B, H and L and papain (t0.5 = 0.1-17.3s). The streptococcal cysteine proteinase reacted much more slowly, and there was no irreversible inactivation of clostripain. The cysteine-dependent exopeptidase dipeptidyl peptidase I was very slowly inactivated by E-64. 2. the active-site-directed nature of the interaction of cathepsin B and papain with E-64 was established by protection of the enzyme in the presence of the reversible competitive inhibitor leupeptin and by the stereospecificity for inhibition by the L as opposed to the D compound. 3. It was shown that the rapid stoichiometric reaction of the cysteine proteinases related to papain can be used to determine the operational molarity of solutions of the enzymes and thus to calibrate rate assays. 4. The apparent second-order rate constants for the inactivation of human cathepsins B and H and rat cathepsin L by a series of structural analogues of E-64 are reported, and compared with those for some other active-site-directed inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. 5. L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(3-methyl)butane (Ep-475) was found to inhibit cathepsins B and L more rapidly than E-64. 6. Fumaryl-leucylamido(3-methyl)butane (Dc-11) was 100-fold less reactive than the corresponding epoxide, but was nevertheless about as effective as iodoacetate.
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Biochem J 201(1): 189-198

L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and its analogues as inhibitors of cysteine proteinases including cathepsins B, H and L.

Abstract

1. L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) at a concentration of 0.5 mM had no effect on the serine proteinases plasma kallikrein and leucocyte elastase or the metalloproteinases thermolysin and clostridial collagenase. In contrast, 10 muM-E-64 rapidly inactivated the cysteine proteinases cathepsins B, H and L and papain (t0.5 = 0.1-17.3s). The streptococcal cysteine proteinase reacted much more slowly, and there was no irreversible inactivation of clostripain. The cysteine-dependent exopeptidase dipeptidyl peptidase I was very slowly inactivated by E-64. 2. the active-site-directed nature of the interaction of cathepsin B and papain with E-64 was established by protection of the enzyme in the presence of the reversible competitive inhibitor leupeptin and by the stereospecificity for inhibition by the L as opposed to the D compound. 3. It was shown that the rapid stoichiometric reaction of the cysteine proteinases related to papain can be used to determine the operational molarity of solutions of the enzymes and thus to calibrate rate assays. 4. The apparent second-order rate constants for the inactivation of human cathepsins B and H and rat cathepsin L by a series of structural analogues of E-64 are reported, and compared with those for some other active-site-directed inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. 5. L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(3-methyl)butane (Ep-475) was found to inhibit cathepsins B and L more rapidly than E-64. 6. Fumaryl-leucylamido(3-methyl)butane (Dc-11) was 100-fold less reactive than the corresponding epoxide, but was nevertheless about as effective as iodoacetate.

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Selected References

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Abstract
1. L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) at a concentration of 0.5 mM had no effect on the serine proteinases plasma kallikrein and leucocyte elastase or the metalloproteinases thermolysin and clostridial collagenase. In contrast, 10 muM-E-64 rapidly inactivated the cysteine proteinases cathepsins B, H and L and papain (t0.5 = 0.1-17.3s). The streptococcal cysteine proteinase reacted much more slowly, and there was no irreversible inactivation of clostripain. The cysteine-dependent exopeptidase dipeptidyl peptidase I was very slowly inactivated by E-64. 2. the active-site-directed nature of the interaction of cathepsin B and papain with E-64 was established by protection of the enzyme in the presence of the reversible competitive inhibitor leupeptin and by the stereospecificity for inhibition by the L as opposed to the D compound. 3. It was shown that the rapid stoichiometric reaction of the cysteine proteinases related to papain can be used to determine the operational molarity of solutions of the enzymes and thus to calibrate rate assays. 4. The apparent second-order rate constants for the inactivation of human cathepsins B and H and rat cathepsin L by a series of structural analogues of E-64 are reported, and compared with those for some other active-site-directed inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. 5. L-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(3-methyl)butane (Ep-475) was found to inhibit cathepsins B and L more rapidly than E-64. 6. Fumaryl-leucylamido(3-methyl)butane (Dc-11) was 100-fold less reactive than the corresponding epoxide, but was nevertheless about as effective as iodoacetate.
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